Notebookcheck

The Galaxy Note5 is not coming to Europe

The Galaxy Note5 is not coming to Europe
The Galaxy Note5 is not coming to Europe
The phablet is already available in certain Asian countries and will be coming to the US this Friday. European users, however, will only receive the S6 Edge+.

After months of rumors and anticipation for the Galaxy Note 5 and S6 Edge+, Samsung had finally announced both phablets at last week's Unpacked press event in NYC. In fact, both devices will be available much sooner than expected for regions worldwide.

Then, the manufacturer dropped the hammer in an instant by revealing that the Galaxy Note 5 will not officially launch in Europe. While the S6 Edge+ will still be available for European users starting September 7, the Galaxy Note 5 will skip the region completely with no real explanation in tow.

According to AndroidCentral, sources close to Samsung say the abrupt decision was due to a variety of factors. For one, sales of the S6 Edge far outpace the Galaxy S6 in most European regions. Secondly, Samsung's research shows that most users in these regions are not regular S Pen users. Thus, by focusing on the stronger and more successful Edge series in Europe, Samsung likely believes that this will be the best way to cater to its audience.

Of course, fans are not at all ecstatic about the decision. Eliminating choice from excited buyers when they were expecting otherwise is a surefire method to enraging customers. This doesn't mean that the Galaxy Note 5 may never see an official launch as Samsung may simply be delaying the phablet, but users shouldn't get their hopes up at least before the end of this year.

Source(s)

Read all 1 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 08 > The Galaxy Note5 is not coming to Europe
Allen Ngo, 2015-08-19 (Update: 2015-08-19)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.