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Samsung Galaxy A9 Pro smartphone surfaces on GFXBench

Samsung Galaxy A9 Pro smartphone surfaces on GFXBench
Samsung Galaxy A9 Pro smartphone surfaces on GFXBench
The smartphone may carry a Snapdragon 652 SoC and a 5.5-inch FHD display instead of a 6-inch QHD display as previously thought.

The Galaxy Pro A9 has appeared with the following specifications:

  • 5.5-inch FHD display
  • 1.8 GHz Cortex-A72 SoC (possibly a Qualcomm Snapdragon 652 SoC)
  • 4 GB RAM
  • 16 MP rear + 8 MP front cameras

The Snapdragon SoC in particular performs very close to the Snapdragon 810 SoC, which was Qualcomm's flagship offering on many high-end smartphones of 2015. The cameras could also be very similar to the ones found on the Huawei Mate 8.

Entries in the GFXBench database have largely been a reliable first look at unannounced devices. Still, the listed display size of 5.5-inch for the potential Galaxy Pro A9 has us scratching our heads. The regular 2016 Galaxy A9 carries a 6-inch screen and the 2016 Galaxy A7 a 5.5-inch screen. Previous rumors have mentioned a 6-inch display for the Galaxy A9 Pro and a higher resolution of 2560 x 1440 pixels. This would put the the smartphone more in line with the original non-Pro version.

Galaxy models ranging from the inexpensive J series all the way up through the mainstream A series and flagship S series have been making headlines left and right through leaks and murmurs of potential announcements. Samsung is expected to reveal its 2016 lineup later this month come MWC 2016 and the Galaxy Unpacked event.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 02 > Samsung Galaxy A9 Pro smartphone surfaces on GFXBench
Andreas Müller/ Allen Ngo, 2016-02- 8 (Update: 2016-02- 8)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.