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Samsung: Galaxy A9 Pro (SM-A9100) spotted at FCC and TENAA

Samsung: Galaxy A9 Pro (SM-A9100) spotted at FCC and TENAA
Samsung: Galaxy A9 Pro (SM-A9100) spotted at FCC and TENAA
The Pro version is now expected to be a larger 6-inch phablet with an AMOLED FHD display in contrast to previous reports.

Samsung is still tight-lipped about the Galaxy A9 Pro (SM-A9100), but the model has already turned up at TENAA and the FCC for wireless certification in the U.S. and China, respectively. The new info contradicts previous reports of the Galaxy A9 Pro in terms of expected screen size.

TENAA is listing the Galaxy A9 Pro as a 6-inch smartphone with a FHD AMOLED panel while an older GFXBench listing from February claims that the device will sport a 5.5-inch display instead. Nonetheless, the rumored 161.7 x 80.9 x 7.9 mm dimensions and 210 g weight both suggest that this will be a 6-inch phablet. Wireless features include WLAN 802.11ac, Bluetooth, LTE, and NFC.

As for internal hardware, both independent sources are saying that the SM-A9100 will carry the Snapdragon 652 (formerly known as the Snapdragon 620), integrated Adreno 510 graphics, 4 GB RAM, and 32 GB of internal storage with MicroSD support up to 128 GB. Cameras include the 16 MP and 8 MP rear and front modules, respectively, with the latest Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow software.

The Galaxy A9 pro appeared in the AnTuTu database and at Bluetooth SIG late last month as well. The 2016 Galaxy A9 was officially announced for the Chinese market back in December.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > Samsung: Galaxy A9 Pro (SM-A9100) spotted at FCC and TENAA
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03- 8 (Update: 2016-03- 8)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.