Notebookcheck

MSI GT72S with Tobii eye-tracking now available

MSI GT72S with Tobii eye-tracking now available
MSI GT72S with Tobii eye-tracking now available
The first ever notebook with integrated Tobii eye-tracking will set users back $2600 USD and come bundled with The Division.

Alongside the Vortex gaming PC tower and VR demonstration, the retro-fitted GT72S with Tobii eye-tracking took center stage at this year's MSI showing for CES 2016. As reported earlier, the well-received 17.3-inch gaming notebook utilizes multiple infrared cameras installed between the display and base to track both eye movement and blinking from the user. The model is now available through Newegg starting at $2600 USD with a Core i7-6820HK overclockable processor and GTX 980M GPU. We recommend checking out our existing review on the GT72S for more information on the hardware and its features.

The Tobii technology was a bit finicky during our time with the demo unit. Speed wasn't an issue and the cameras were able to ignore adjacent faces next to the primary user, but precision was shaky at times. Nonetheless, its usefulness will depend wholly on software support with The Division, Assassin's Creed Syndicate, and ArmA III being some of the bigger compatible titles. It's too early to simply call the feature a gimmick, but the tracking tech will have to fundamentally improve user experience both in and out of games if it hopes to make a lasting impression.

We queried MSI if the Tobii cameras will be implemented on other models besides the GT72S, but no formal plans have been announced. Users can still purchase Tobii eye tracking hardware for desktops as a separate option.

 

 

Source(s)

MSI

+ Show Press Release
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 02 > MSI GT72S with Tobii eye-tracking now available
Allen Ngo, 2016-02- 7 (Update: 2016-02- 8)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.