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Computex 2016 | MSI shows off GS63 Stealth gaming notebook with unannounced Nvidia GPU

MSI shows off GS63 Stealth gaming notebook with unannounced Nvidia GPU
MSI shows off GS63 Stealth gaming notebook with unannounced Nvidia GPU
An October launch window suggests that this redesigned 15.6-inch gaming notebook will be ready to carry an Nvidia Pascal GPU.

The new MSI GS63 Stealth has made its debut at Computex 2016, but the manufacturer is remaining mum on the exact GPU it will ship with. All signs point to Pascal, which should provide a hefty performance boost based on the tremendous success and performance of the desktop GTX 1080. It's possible that the GS63 will come equipped with the GTX 1060(M) or even the 1070(M).

Other than the GPU mystery, features include the usual NVMe SSD, USB Type-C with Thunderbolt, and ESS Sabre DAC for lossless Hi-Fi audio, all of which have been available since the last MSI G series refresh. This time, however, MSI is promising that the GS63 will run cooler and quieter than the outgoing generation that was notorious for its very warm temperatures. The refreshed design will carry three fans instead of two for improved airflow. Nonetheless, it remains to be seen if this will actually make the notebook run any quieter. A 17.3-inch GS73 version is also planned.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > MSI shows off GS63 Stealth gaming notebook with unannounced Nvidia GPU
Klaus Hinum/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06- 2 (Update: 2016-06- 2)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.