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Power-over-Ethernet on some Intel NUCs is now possible

An Intel mini-PC with a GBT-NUC lid on. (Source: PoE Texas)
An Intel mini-PC with a GBT-NUC lid on. (Source: PoE Texas)
PoE Texas has announced the GBT-NUC, a new type of lid for certain Intel mini PCs that enables them to access power and data through just 1 Ethernet cable. Therefore, the devices can function independently of a conventional wall-plug, and may make them into more versatile office computers, display controllers or media-centers.
Deirdre O Donnell,

Power over Ethernet is a technique by which devices can be sustained through an RJ45 cable alone. This allows for their placement independent of typical power socket location. PoE Texas is one company that provides the hardware enabling these options, which can offer more flexibility when setting up an office or other purpose-designed space such as a home theater.

The OEM's latest accessory is the GBT-NUC, a new type of lid for 7th-, 8th- or 10th-generation Intel NUCs. It slots easily on top of one of these PCs and allows them to draw power through an Ethernet port, so long as they are rated to do so at 60 watts (W) or less. Therefore, PoE Texas argues that this gives the user greater freedom to put their NUC anywhere in the room (however, it will still need to be within reach of the single cable it will need).

PoE also allows for data access; therefore, the compatible mini PCs can also use 10/100/1000 Gigabit speeds with one of these lids attached. They support the Cisco uPOE and IEEE 802.3bt dual-signature PoE standards. PoE Texas recommends the Frost Canyon i3 (NUC10i3FNK), i5 or i7 Dawson Canyon (NUC7iXDNHE) or June Canyon Celeron (NUC7CJYH) models specifically for optimal compatibility with its GBT-NUC. It is available from the OEM or on Amazon for US$149.99.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 12 > Power-over-Ethernet on some Intel NUCs is now possible
Deirdre O Donnell, 2019-12-19 (Update: 2019-12-19)
Deirdre O'Donnell
I became a professional writer and editor shortly after graduation. My degrees are in biomedical sciences; however, they led to some experience in the biotech area, which convinced me of its potential to revolutionize our health, environment and lives in general. This developed into an all-consuming interest in more aspects of tech over time: I can never write enough on the latest electronics, gadgets and innovations. My other interests include imaging, astronomy, and streaming all the things. Oh, and coffee.