Notebookcheck

Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F Convertible Review

Florian Wimmer, Stefanie Voigt (translated by Vinay Pradhan), 11/13/2016

Multitalented. Would you like a tablet which is also a graphics tablet? Want a keyboard too? The Lenovo Yoga Book Android offers all this and more. We will check how well the device performs in our in-depth review.

For the original German review, see here.

Every now and then, Lenovo brings surprising concepts to the market. They have designed a tablet with a beamer (Yoga Tab 3 Pro) and a modular ThinkPad X1 Tablet. The new Yoga Book is also an innovative device: instead of packing a keyboard dock for their tablet, Lenovo has designed a graphics tablet which can turn into a keyboard and a touchpad when needed. The stylus is a special highlight as it comes with two interchangeable heads: a ball-pen with real ink for paper and a soft head for the screen. If you place a piece of paper on the graphics tablet, you can comfortably write and draw while the tablet digitizes all your notes.

We have already tested the Windows version of the Yoga Book and found it to be an exciting device. Of course, the Yoga Book is a niche device and will not find favor with every user. Lenovo has now released the Yoga Book with Android and we want to find out what it can do: does the digitization work as well as on the Windows device? Who would be interested in this device? And of course: can the Android version last longer than the Yoga Book with Windows 10?

It is hard to find direct competitors, as Lenovo has created a special concept. We will be comparing the test model to the Google Pixel C and the iPad Pro 9.7. We will also include the Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet for comparison, as it is a high-end tablet. We will be actively comparing the Windows version of the Yoga Book with our test model to determine how the two devices differ.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Especially English native speakers welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F (Yoga Book Series)
Memory
4096 MB 
, LPDDR3
Display
10.1 inch 16:9, 1920 x 1080 pixel 218 PPI, Multi-Touch, native pen support, IPS, Gamut: 70%, Color depth: 16.7 Million, Brightness: 400 nits, glossy: yes
Storage
64 GB eMMC Flash, 64 GB 
, , 52 GB free
Connections
1 USB 2.0, 1 HDMI, Audio Connections: 3.5 mm, Card Reader: microSD up to 128GB, Brightness Sensor, Sensors: Vibration, Accelerometer, Position sensor, Ambient light, Hall
Networking
802.11 a/b/g/n/ac (a/b/g/n = Wi-Fi 4/ac = Wi-Fi 5), Bluetooth 4.0, GPS
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 9.6 x 256.6 x 170.8 ( = 0.38 x 10.1 x 6.72 in)
Battery
32 Wh, 8500 mAh Lithium-Polymer, Battery runtime (according to manufacturer): 15 h
Operating System
Android 6.0 Marshmallow
Camera
Primary Camera: 8 MPix Auto focus
Secondary Camera: 2 MPix
Additional features
Speakers: Dolby Atmos Stereo speakers, Keyboard: Halo keyboard on the graphics tablet, Keyboard Light: yes, Stift with interchangeable heads, Charger, USB-C cable, Art Rage, McAfee Security, SHAREit, SYNCit, Note Saver, 12 Months Warranty, fanless
Weight
690 g ( = 24.34 oz / 1.52 pounds), Power Supply: 75 g ( = 2.65 oz / 0.17 pounds)
Price
500 Euro
Note: The manufacturer may use components from different suppliers including display panels, drives or memory sticks with similar specifications.

 

Case

The test model has the same case as the Windows device. It is available in anthracite or gold and has impressive sturdiness thanks to the strong materials used. The "watchband" hinges are another highlight of the case as they not only look good, but they also work well.

The tablet seems to be nearly impervious to pressure. However, under very strong pressure, the display can distort. It can also be bent quite a bit.

As the graphics tablet with the Halo keyboard cannot be removed, the weight of the device is set at 690 grams. This means that our test model is heavier than traditional tablets. It even weighs more than the Google Pixel C with a standard keyboard dock. However, the Lenovo Yoga Book can still be easily transported in a bag and is lighter than the slimmest Ultrabooks.

Size Comparison

256.6 mm / 10.1 inch 170.8 mm / 6.72 inch 9.6 mm / 0.378 inch 690 g1.521 lbs256.6 mm / 10.1 inch 170.8 mm / 6.72 inch 9.6 mm / 0.378 inch 695 g1.532 lbs254 mm / 10 inch 167 mm / 6.57 inch 6.1 mm / 0.2402 inch 393 g0.866 lbs242 mm / 9.53 inch 179 mm / 7.05 inch 7 mm / 0.2756 inch 517 g1.14 lbs240 mm / 9.45 inch 169.5 mm / 6.67 inch 6.1 mm / 0.2402 inch 444 g0.979 lbs

Connectivity

The connectivity of the Yoga Book Android is a double-edged sword: on the one hand, there are definitely convertibles with more ports. On the other hand, the Yoga Book has an extra mini-HDMI port alongside the USB port (USB 2.0), which is special for Android tablets. A Type-C USB port would have raised the value of this device greatly, as there are already various docks available for this port.

Our test model is not equipped with a WWAN module, which saves the buyer around 100 Euros (~$108). We tested the performance of this module in the Windows version of the Yoga Book.

The tablet has a microSD slot, which is hidden behind a flap like in the WWAN model. A SIM tool is necessary to open this flap. Although this is a little inconvenient, it is a common procedure for tablets and smartphones. The memory can be expanded by up to 128 GB.

USB-OTG is supported. This means that external storage devices can be connected via an adapter to the USB port. However this could raise conflicts, as the USB port is also used for charging. Wireless Display is not available.

Front: no ports
Front: no ports
Back: no ports
Back: no ports
Left: USB, SIM slot, microSD slot, mini-HDMI, speakers
Left: USB, SIM slot, microSD slot, mini-HDMI, speakers
Right: power key, ventilation vent, speakers, volume rockers, 3.5 mm headset jack
Right: power key, ventilation vent, speakers, volume rockers, 3.5 mm headset jack

Software

Thanks to projects like "Android x86", Android can run well on x86 processors. To increase user comfort, the menu bar is placed on the bottom of the screen: all open apps are displayed as symbols on the bar (like the Windows bar). The user can quickly swap between apps but the symbols cannot be pinned to the start bar.

Apps are opened in windowsand can be placed next to each other or in full screen mode (...like Windows). The only flaw: the classic Android menu buttons (Home, Back and Overview) are a little too small. All-in-all, this bar is a good addition.

Lenovo has installed Android 6.0.1 on the device. The security patches are from July 1, 2016 and are in need of an update.

The manufacturer has also packed in some software. There are two interactive apps for users to get to know the tablet. However, it is not possible to pause them once they start. Lenovo uses the Google Office suite and ArtRage for drawing with the graphics tablet.

Communication and GPS

As mentioned before, our test model comes without WWAN, but the user can still access the WWW with the WLAN in this device. The WLAN module supports the 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac standards. In our practical WLAN test, the device is placed one meter from the reference router, the FritzBox 6490, and the Yoga Book Android performs quite well: 452 MB/s while receiving and 322 MB/s while sending. There are definitely faster models out there, but the tablet works well enough for everyday use.

The reception quality is very good: near the router, the tablet can load websites quickly and has full bars. At 10 meters with three walls between the device and the router, the reception drops to 3/4 bars, but the websites are loaded just as fast as before (subjective).

Networking
iperf Server (receive) TCP 1 m
Asus TransformerBook T302CA-FL010T
HD Graphics 515, 6Y30, Samsung CM871 MZNLF128HCHP
583 MBit/s ∼100% +29%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
452 MBit/s ∼78%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15IKB 80VC000XGE
Radeon R7 M460, 7200U, Samsung MZYTY256HDHP (jseb)
349 MBit/s ∼60% -23%
iperf Client (transmit) TCP 1 m
Asus TransformerBook T302CA-FL010T
HD Graphics 515, 6Y30, Samsung CM871 MZNLF128HCHP
480 MBit/s ∼100% +49%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
322 MBit/s ∼67%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15IKB 80VC000XGE
Radeon R7 M460, 7200U, Samsung MZYTY256HDHP (jseb)
307 MBit/s ∼64% -5%
GPS test indoors
GPS test indoors
GPS test outdoors
GPS test outdoors

The GPS module of the Yoga Book Android was a problem for us: it could not locate us indoors or outdoors. It is normal for devices to have poor reception indoors, but the fact that the tablet could not locate a satellite outdoors is a bit worrisome. Even Google Maps was not able to pinpoint the device and we believe that the test model might have a faulty GPS module.

We ran another test to check the GPS module. We took the tablet with our reference professional navigation device, the Garmin Edge 500, out for a bike ride. Although the GPS module of the Yoga Book had reception, it was not very accurate, as the device set far too few measurement points. The Garmin device produced a more accurate path as it recorded more points.

All-in-all, the Yoga Book should not be your first choice as a navigation device.

GPS Garmin Edge 500 – overview
GPS Garmin Edge 500 – overview
GPS Garmin Edge 500 – bridge
GPS Garmin Edge 500 – bridge
GPS Garmin Edge 500 – forest
GPS Garmin Edge 500 – forest
GPS Lenovo Yoga Book – overview
GPS Lenovo Yoga Book – overview
GPS Lenovo Yoga Book – bridge
GPS Lenovo Yoga Book – bridge
GPS Lenovo Yoga Book – forest
GPS Lenovo Yoga Book – forest

Cameras

Front camera
Front camera

The Yoga Book offers two decent cameras (for a tablet): we had to search for the 8 MP main camera as it sits above the Halo keyboard. The 2 MP front camera is placed on top of the screen.

Both cameras do a decent job. The user should not expect much from the front camera, due to the low resolution and poor dynamics. However, the pictures do have decent colors and sharpness. This camera suffices for video chats.

The main camera takes colorful pictures. Objects have a color fringe and the recorded pictures are from the level of the detail offered by the Apple iPad Pro 9.7. Still, the pictures of the tablet have decent sharpness and enough details for the occasional snapshot. Videos can be recorded in 1080p with 30 frames per second. The brightness switch from dark to bright subjects is fast but cannot be compared to high-quality cameras. In good lighting conditions, the camera can be used to record videos.

Image Comparison

Choose a scene and navigate within the first image. One click changes the position on touchscreens. One click on the zoomed-in image opens the original in a new window. The first image shows the scaled photograph of the test device.

Scene 1Scene 2Scene 3

To further analyze the picture quality, we brought the test model to our lab and took a few pictures with pre-defined lighting. We checked the color accuracy and found the camera to be far off the ideal values: the colors are too bright.

The reference card seems too blurry and it seems as if the camera cannot come to terms with the studio lighting and ends up over-exposing the image. When zoomed in, the color patches appear grainy and exhibit clear compression artifacts.

ColorChecker colors photographed. In the bottom half of each patch we have the original colors.
ColorChecker colors photographed. In the bottom half of each patch we have the original colors.
Reference card - photo
Reference card - photo
Reference card - detailed
Reference card - detailed

Accessories and Warranty

The delivery of the test model includes a USB cable, the digitizer pen with removable heads and a magnetic Book Pad with paper. A SIM tool is also provided. This will help users open the SIM and/or microSD-card slots (depending on the model).

Lenovo offers a fitting sleeve for roughly 40 Euros (~$43). The RealPen can be bought again for 50 Euros (~$54). For 10 Euros (~$11), the user will receive three ink refills. Paper and a replacement Book Pad will also be available soon.

Not exactly customer-friendly: after 12 months, the warranty runs out. Most other manufacturers offer 24 months.

Input Devices and Interface

One of the most exciting aspects of the Yoga Book is the input devices. This innovative concept for the keyboard and touchpad requires some time to get used to. The display is a standard touchscreen, which means, depending on the mode, the keyboard is shown as an on-screen keyboard or it is displayed as backlit keys on the graphics tablet. The latter is dubbed the "Halo keyboard".

The technology for the graphics tablet originates from Wacom (graphics tablet experts). The stylus, dubbed RealPen, works without batteries and can be used with a soft or ball-pen head. There is no slot for the stylus or the "Book Pad" in the tablet. However, the Book Pad magnetically sticks to the graphics tablet and offers many pages to write on. While the user comfortably writes with the ball-pen head of the stylus on the pad, their notes will be digitized.

This works incredibly well: text and diagrams are quickly and accurately transferred to a digital format (see YouTube video below). There is a slight delay between the input and the digitization but it does not make the process inconvenient.

The RealPen can also work on the touchscreen, but the user must first swap out the ball-pen head for the soft head. The display supports the AnyPen technology from Lenovo which allows the user to take any object, from a carrot to a pen, and use it for touch input. Of course, this will result in different levels of input accuracy, depending on the object used. The RealPen or the finger remain the most reliable input devices available.

The Halo keyboard automatically turns on and off, depending on the position of the 360-degree graphics tablet. Despite the keys being simply backlit areas, the keyboard works very nicely. Lenovo recommends first-time users to keep their eyes on the keyboard while typing, as this will allow them to get more comfortable with the device and later type faster without needing to look down. The keyboard offers automatic corrections on the screen, which further simplify the typing process. The feedback is good and is provided via sounds and vibration.

The on-screen keyboard of the touchscreen is named "TouchPal". It offers various settings and input options. Each key represents two characters. This design may not appeal to all users. Personally, we prefer the standard Google keyboard, as it provides a better overview. It is possible to change the keyboard from the settings or load another one from the Play store.

Additional details about the input devices can be found in the "Input Devices & Interface" section of the Yoga Book with Windows Review.

On-screen keyboard landscape mode
On-screen keyboard landscape mode
On-screen keyboard portrait mode
On-screen keyboard portrait mode
You can simply put a piece of paper on the graphics tablet.
You can simply put a piece of paper on the graphics tablet.
The keyboard can be hard to read in bright lighting conditions.
The keyboard can be hard to read in bright lighting conditions.
Overall, the keyboard works surprisingly well.
Overall, the keyboard works surprisingly well.

Display

Subpixels
Subpixels

The 10.1-inch display of the Yoga Book may not be optimally sized for everyday, office work. However, on-the-go, it seems to be an ideal compromise between portability and size. The FHD screen performs well in our tests: the brightness measures 421 cd/m², which is even brighter than the Yoga Book with Windows. The illumination is also more balanced at 86%, but there is room for improvement. The differences in brightness all over the screen are visible when looking at large color areas.

447
cd/m²
447
cd/m²
399
cd/m²
428
cd/m²
449
cd/m²
388
cd/m²
416
cd/m²
427
cd/m²
387
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro 2
Maximum: 449 cd/m² Average: 420.9 cd/m² Minimum: 4.7 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 86 %
Center on Battery: 449 cd/m²
Contrast: 1403:1 (Black: 0.32 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 4.7 | 0.6-29.43 Ø6
ΔE Greyscale 4.5 | 0.64-98 Ø6.2
94.3% sRGB (Calman 2D)
Gamma: 2.22
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
IPS, 1920x1080, 10.1
Google Pixel C
LTPS, 2560x1800, 10.2
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
IPS, 2048x1536, 9.7
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Triluminos display with X-Reality, 2560x1600, 10.1
Lenovo Yoga Book 2016 Windows 64GB LTE
IPS , 1920x1080, 10.1
Screen
-12%
23%
-41%
-1%
Brightness middle
449
487
8%
523
16%
471
5%
382
-15%
Brightness
421
510
21%
500
19%
457
9%
363
-14%
Brightness Distribution
86
91
6%
93
8%
92
7%
83
-3%
Black Level *
0.32
0.39
-22%
0.52
-63%
0.46
-44%
0.37
-16%
Contrast
1403
1249
-11%
1006
-28%
1024
-27%
1032
-26%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
4.7
5.24
-11%
1.1
77%
8.69
-85%
3.61
23%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 max. *
11.1
1.9
83%
7.92
29%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
4.5
7.95
-77%
1.4
69%
11.24
-150%
3.77
16%
Gamma
2.22 99%
2.16 102%
2.11 104%
2.17 101%
2.43 91%
CCT
7122 91%
6565 99%
6662 98%
9508 68%
6760 96%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
62.97
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
99.55
99

* ... smaller is better

At 0.32 cd/m², the black value of the Yoga Book Android is very low and results in a contrast ratio of 1,403:1. Once again, our test model can top the Windows model. The display cannot be optimized with the preinstalled apps or the available settings.

However, this is not really necessary: although the colors are a bit too bright, the display does a good job of presenting content. The objective measurements using a spectrophotometer and the CalMAN software confirm our impression: there is a noticeable blue tinge, but it is far lighter than that of other tablets. The color deviations might be a little higher than those of the Windows version of the Yoga Book, but both devices do a really good job and are only beaten by the iPad Pro 9.7.

CalMAN Color Accuracy
CalMAN Color Accuracy
CalMAN - Colorspace
CalMAN - Colorspace
CalMAN - Grayscales
CalMAN - Grayscales
CalMAN - Saturation
CalMAN - Saturation

Outdoors, the max brightness is just high enough to recognize content on the reflective display. The brightness sensor works well. The Halo keyboard is also a problem, as the keys are hard to recognize in bright lighting.

The viewing angles are very good and we did not observe any color deviations at extreme angles.

Outdoors, minimum brightness
Outdoors, minimum brightness
Outdoors, medium brightness
Outdoors, medium brightness
Outdoors, max brightness
Outdoors, max brightness
Outdoors, brightness sensor
Outdoors, brightness sensor
Viewing angles
Viewing angles

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
24 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 7 ms rise
↘ 17 ms fall
The screen shows good response rates in our tests, but may be too slow for competitive gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 34 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is similar to the average of all tested devices (24.8 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
54 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 28 ms rise
↘ 26 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 89 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (39.5 ms).

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM not detected

In comparison: 51 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 9331 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 142900) Hz was measured.

Performance

The tablet is equipped with an Intel Atom x5-Z8550, which is an SoC with 4 x86 cores from the "Airmont" Intel series. The processor can run at 1.44 - 2.4 GHz, which means the Yoga Book Android places well against other tablets. The super-fast (and expensive) iPad Pro 9.7 takes the crown in this section. The same SoC from our test model can be found in the Windows version of the Yoga Book.

The Google Pixel C is very close to our test model in processor and system benchmarks. Subjectively, both devices should be equally fast.

The graphics chip of our test model is the Intel HD Graphics (Cherry Trail). This places our device in the back of the queue in terms of performance.

AnTuTu v6 - Total Score
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
168840 Points ∼58% +90%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
90568 Points ∼31% +2%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
88989 Points ∼30%
3DMark
2560x1440 Sling Shot OpenGL ES 3.0 Physics
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
1807 Points ∼37% +10%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
1643 Points ∼34%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
1205 Points ∼25% -27%
2560x1440 Sling Shot OpenGL ES 3.0 Graphics
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
6127 Points ∼54% +328%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
4293 Points ∼38% +200%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
1431 Points ∼13%
2560x1440 Sling Shot OpenGL ES 3.0
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
4002 Points ∼48% +172%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
2735 Points ∼33% +86%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
1926 Points ∼23% +31%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
1473 Points ∼18%
1280x720 offscreen Ice Storm Unlimited Physics
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
22527 Points ∼26% +73%
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
16023 Points ∼19% +23%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
13056 Points ∼15%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
11189 Points ∼13% -14%
1280x720 offscreen Ice Storm Unlimited Graphics Score
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
52816 Points ∼10% +189%
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
50084 Points ∼9% +174%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
37312 Points ∼7% +104%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
18258 Points ∼3%
1280x720 offscreen Ice Storm Unlimited Score
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
40665 Points ∼17% +142%
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
34015 Points ∼14% +103%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
24566 Points ∼10% +46%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
16773 Points ∼7%
GFXBench (DX / GLBenchmark) 2.7
1920x1080 T-Rex HD Offscreen C24Z16
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
117.1 fps ∼1% +278%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
69 fps ∼1% +123%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
54 fps ∼0% +74%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
31 fps ∼0%
T-Rex HD Onscreen C24Z16
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
59.4 fps ∼2% +92%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
39 fps ∼1% +26%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
37 fps ∼1% +19%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
31 fps ∼1%
GFXBench 3.0
off screen Manhattan Offscreen OGL
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
51 fps ∼9% +264%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
40 fps ∼7% +186%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
26 fps ∼5% +86%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
14 fps ∼3%
on screen Manhattan Onscreen OGL
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
35.1 fps ∼10% +134%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
22 fps ∼6% +47%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
16 fps ∼4% +7%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
15 fps ∼4%
GFXBench 3.1
off screen Manhattan ES 3.1 Offscreen
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
39.5 fps ∼1% +449%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
31 fps ∼1% +331%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
18 fps ∼0% +150%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
7.2 fps ∼0%
on screen Manhattan ES 3.1 Onscreen
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
26.9 fps ∼1% +284%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
13 fps ∼0% +86%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
9.4 fps ∼0% +34%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
7 fps ∼0%
PCMark for Android - Work performance score
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
6858 Points ∼35% +52%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
4504 Points ∼23%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
4441 Points ∼23% -1%
BaseMark OS II
Web
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
1185 Points ∼58% +22%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
973 Points ∼48%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
884 Points ∼43% -9%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
758 Points ∼37% -22%
Graphics
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
6485 Points ∼22% +219%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
6355 Points ∼22% +212%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
2683 Points ∼9% +32%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
2035 Points ∼7%
Memory
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
2185 Points ∼29% +72%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
1270 Points ∼17%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
954 Points ∼13% -25%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
868 Points ∼12% -32%
System
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
6098 Points ∼37% +198%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
2724 Points ∼17% +33%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
2488 Points ∼15% +22%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
2047 Points ∼12%
Overall
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
3181 Points ∼38% +111%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
1909 Points ∼23% +27%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
1506 Points ∼18%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
1482 Points ∼18% -2%
Geekbench 4.0
Compute RenderScript Score
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
4357 Points ∼34%
64 Bit Multi-Core Score
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
3118 Points ∼9%
64 Bit Single-Core Score
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
1025 Points ∼16%

The Yoga Book Android cannot take the lead in web surfing. Our device places in the middle of the table and delivers a good surfing experience. Once again, the Apple iPad Pro 9.7 is much faster.

JetStream 1.1 - Total Score
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
143 Points ∼41% +219%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
47.4 Points ∼13% +6%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
44.84 Points ∼13%
Octane V2 - Total Score
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
19621 Points ∼37% +143%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
8060 Points ∼15%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
7790 Points ∼15% -3%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
7563 Points ∼14% -6%
Mozilla Kraken 1.1 - Total Score
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
5533.1 ms * ∼9% -25%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
4419 ms * ∼7%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
4064 ms * ∼7% +8%
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
1546.3 ms * ∼3% +65%
WebXPRT 2015 - Overall Score
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
A9X / PowerVR GT7xxx, A9X, Apple 256 GB (iPad Pro 9.7 NVMe)
225 Points ∼28% +96%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
128 Points ∼16% +11%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
115 Points ∼14%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
93 Points ∼12% -19%

* ... smaller is better

The memory transfer speeds of the Yoga Book Android place it solidly in the middle of the table again. The sequential read/write speeds are rather slow, while the random access speeds are faster than the other Android tablets being used for comparison.

The memory card read speeds using our referenced micro-SD card, the Toshiba Exceria Pro M401, paint a similar picture: the access speeds are fine, but they are not great.

AndroBench 3-5
Sequential Write 256KB SDCard
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
30.6 MB/s ∼35%
Sequential Read 256KB SDCard
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
48.9 MB/s ∼51%
Random Write 4KB
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
13.6 MB/s ∼5% +16%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
11.7 MB/s ∼5%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
10.08 MB/s ∼4% -14%
Random Read 4KB
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
23.5 MB/s ∼10%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
20 MB/s ∼9% -15%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
19.96 MB/s ∼9% -15%
Sequential Write 256KB
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
109.38 MB/s ∼19% +36%
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
81 MB/s ∼14% 0%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
80.6 MB/s ∼14%
Sequential Read 256KB
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
Adreno 430, 810 MSM8994, 32 GB eMMC Flash
256 MB/s ∼14% +79%
Google Pixel C
Tegra X1 Maxwell GPU, X1, 64 GB eMMC Flash
154.29 MB/s ∼9% +8%
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
HD Graphics 400 (Braswell), Z8550, 64 GB eMMC Flash
143.4 MB/s ∼8%

Games

The Yoga Book limits its screen to a mere 30 frames per second, but it achieves this frame rate consistently in both games we tested: Asphalt 8: Airborne and Dead Trigger 2. Simpler games, such as, Angry Birds should not be any trouble for our tablet. In short, the device has enough power to run similar games.

The touch screen and position sensor work without issues.

Dead Trigger 2
Dead Trigger 2
Asphalt 8: Airborne
Asphalt 8: Airborne
Asphalt 8: Airborne
 SettingsValue
 high30 fps
 very low30 fps
Dead Trigger 2
 SettingsValue
 high30 fps

Emissions

Battery test GFXBench
Battery test GFXBench

Temperature

The surface temperatures can be summarized quickly: at no time was the tablet too hot. At a max temperature of 31.3 °C, the tablet is barely hot. The power adapter stays comfortably cool.

During the GFXBench battery test, we test to see if the system throttles after long periods of load. The speeds of the tablet fluctuate significantly, but they always come back to the same value. We assume that due to the relatively low heat emissions, the SoC can offer full performance even after longer periods of load.

Heat-map Back
Heat-map Back
Heat-map Front
Heat-map Front
Max. Load
 26.1 °C
79 F
26.4 °C
80 F
27.6 °C
82 F
 
 26.5 °C
80 F
27.3 °C
81 F
27.5 °C
82 F
 
 27.2 °C
81 F
28.5 °C
83 F
29.2 °C
85 F
 
Maximum: 29.2 °C = 85 F
Average: 27.4 °C = 81 F
28.5 °C
83 F
31.3 °C
88 F
29.5 °C
85 F
27.3 °C
81 F
28.3 °C
83 F
29.3 °C
85 F
26.7 °C
80 F
27.2 °C
81 F
28 °C
82 F
Maximum: 31.3 °C = 88 F
Average: 28.5 °C = 83 F
Power Supply (max.)  35.8 °C = 96 F | Room Temperature 21.4 °C = 71 F | Voltcraft IR-350
(+) The average temperature for the upper side under maximal load is 27.4 °C / 81 F, compared to the average of 30.3 °C / 87 F for the devices in the class Convertible.
(+) The maximum temperature on the upper side is 29.2 °C / 85 F, compared to the average of 35.4 °C / 96 F, ranging from 21.8 to 55.7 °C for the class Convertible.
(+) The bottom heats up to a maximum of 31.3 °C / 88 F, compared to the average of 36.5 °C / 98 F
(+) In idle usage, the average temperature for the upper side is 26.3 °C / 79 F, compared to the device average of 30.3 °C / 87 F.
(+) The palmrests and touchpad are cooler than skin temperature with a maximum of 29.2 °C / 84.6 F and are therefore cool to the touch.
(±) The average temperature of the palmrest area of similar devices was 28.9 °C / 84 F (-0.3 °C / -0.6 F).

Speakers

Lenovo has installed two stereo speakers in the device. They are seated on the left and right sides of the graphics tablet. According to our analysis, the speakers are decently loud and offer more bass than the comparison devices. The high notes are well balanced. The preinstalled Dolby app allows the user to tweak the sound output.

Classical music suffers from the ever-present high notes. However, pop music is a joy on this tablet. The device can fill a room well. Movies and speech also sound good.

The user can use the 3.5 mm audio jack or Bluetooth to connect external speakers or headphones and enjoy even better sound.

dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2029.330.929.32524.730.424.73124.331.124.34028.83228.85027.128.427.16325.724.925.7802725.8271003226.23212539.933.239.916037.123.437.120044.121.844.125047.421.947.431550.221.250.24005422.25450057.721.557.763060.118.960.180068.318.168.3100070.616.470.6125070.715.870.7160067.316.367.3200060.815.960.8250063.314.763.3315062.314.862.3400066.614.366.65000701470630071.313.771.3800064.713.764.7100006513.5651250061.413.561.41600057.313.457.3SPL79.328.979.3N441.244median 61.4median 16.3median 61.4Delta8.63.88.63730.934.43725.629.328.925.628.931.523.728.929.331.830.929.33935.937.23933.535.130.533.52730.928.52722.432.722.322.423.534.522.923.530.438.92030.434.443.420.434.440.649.719.840.644.255.620.344.247.158.619.247.152.265.917.952.257.172.616.357.15770.417.65758.472.41858.46176.917.66163.779.21763.760.376.717.260.359.275.717.759.256.977.717.356.963.181.917.463.166.688.517.766.664.584.81864.553.975.617.753.947.569.518.247.542.164.217.942.133.357.317.833.373.392.829.873.329.588.31.329.5median 53.9median 70.4median 17.9median 53.99.411.71.39.439.631.432.735.235.439.635.230.636.927.629.735.227.530.127.224.829.527.527.828.428.227.129.727.834.845.632.435.439.734.831.934.833.53733.931.931.633.628.530.328.531.63437.733.527.828.2344345.529.434.126434650.636.736.520.64650.854.239.840.120.750.855.560.842.342.820.655.561.363.246.147.42161.359.266.746.447.118.459.26368.445.44618.76359.166.447.74817.959.164.770.950.752.918.664.768.173.853.254.817.568.173.178.65860.416.973.175.178.859.259.317.475.169.575.854.455.716.269.569.378.954.559.416.969.371.776.556.656.317.571.770.378.953.858.317.270.369.481.452.960.917.769.472.482.955.862.517.472.469.48253.160.317.669.461.678.345.15617.661.65875.239.851.617.85848.868.73145.717.948.882.490.666.970.529.882.453.28520.625.51.353.2median 63median 73.8median 47.7median 52.9median 17.8median 638.49.37.27.31.68.431.332.831.329.532.529.530.136.930.128.329.928.326.631.226.626.826.326.826.726.326.726.526.626.52824.72831.224.131.232.622.232.63021.53037.120.737.153.22053.253.819.253.856.618.556.654185456.71856.759.517.559.560.317.260.353.917.553.955.917.455.963.217.663.260.617.860.66117.86150.117.950.150.117.950.155.917.855.953.417.753.440.722.140.770.430.270.425.31.425.3median 53.8median 18median 53.88.32.28.3hearing rangehide median Pink NoiseLenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90FGoogle Pixel CApple iPad Pro 9.7Lenovo Yoga Book 2016 Windows 64GB LTE
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F audio analysis

(±) | speaker loudness is average but good (79.27 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 19.6% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (10.7% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(±) | higher mids - on average 5.5% higher than median
(±) | linearity of mids is average (8.4% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 4.8% away from median
(+) | highs are linear (6.2% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (19.3% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 39% of all tested devices in this class were better, 10% similar, 51% worse
» The best had a delta of 11%, average was 22%, worst was 53%
Compared to all devices tested
» 38% of all tested devices were better, 7% similar, 55% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Google Pixel C audio analysis

(+) | speakers can play relatively loud (92.79 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 28% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (7.8% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(±) | higher mids - on average 5.3% higher than median
(±) | linearity of mids is average (7.3% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(±) | higher highs - on average 8.9% higher than median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (9% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (24.2% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 64% of all tested devices in this class were better, 6% similar, 30% worse
» The best had a delta of 7%, average was 22%, worst was 50%
Compared to all devices tested
» 68% of all tested devices were better, 7% similar, 25% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Apple iPad Pro 9.7 audio analysis

(+) | speakers can play relatively loud (90.59 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 21.8% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (8.8% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 4.3% away from median
(+) | mids are linear (5% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(±) | higher highs - on average 6.1% higher than median
(+) | highs are linear (4.2% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (16.7% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 22% of all tested devices in this class were better, 6% similar, 71% worse
» The best had a delta of 7%, average was 22%, worst was 50%
Compared to all devices tested
» 22% of all tested devices were better, 7% similar, 71% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Lenovo Yoga Book 2016 Windows 64GB LTE audio analysis

(-) | not very loud speakers (67 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 22.9% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (7.4% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 2.3% away from median
(±) | linearity of mids is average (12.2% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(±) | higher highs - on average 5% higher than median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (11.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (24.8% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 69% of all tested devices in this class were better, 8% similar, 22% worse
» The best had a delta of 11%, average was 22%, worst was 53%
Compared to all devices tested
» 71% of all tested devices were better, 6% similar, 23% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Frequency diagram in comparison (checkboxes above can be selected)

Energy Management

Power Consumption

The good news is that the Yoga Android tablet needs less power than the Windows version. In addition, while idle, the Apple iPad Pro 9.7 consumes more power. At load, the device needs 11.26 W, which is relatively low.

While turned off, the Yoga Android tablet needs 0.12 W. This is a little too much. However, all-in-all, the device should have very good battery life, right?

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0.12 / 0.12 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 2.19 / 4.3 / 4.37 Watt
Load midlight 8.62 / 11.26 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
8500 mAh
Google Pixel C
 mAh
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
7306 mAh
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
 mAh
Lenovo Yoga Book 2016 Windows 64GB LTE
8500 mAh
Power Consumption
-4%
-26%
-13%
Idle Minimum *
2.19
1.82
17%
1.71
22%
2
9%
Idle Average *
4.3
4.26
1%
7.55
-76%
4.6
-7%
Idle Maximum *
4.37
4.33
1%
7.62
-74%
5.7
-30%
Load Average *
8.62
9.82
-14%
8.39
3%
11.5
-33%
Load Maximum *
11.26
13.99
-24%
12.08
-7%
11.5
-2%

* ... smaller is better

Battery Life

Yes, the battery life is good. In fact, it is clearly better than that of the Windows version. The tablet can be used to surf with the WLAN for a good 10 hours. However, the Google Pixel C and the Apple iPad Pro 9.7 can last much longer.

During our testing, we could use the Yoga Book Android for two days. The device can be fully charged within two to two-and-a-half hours.

Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
33h 05min
NBC WiFi Websurfing Battery Test 1.3
10h 02min
Big Buck Bunny H.264 1080p
11h 42min
Load (maximum brightness)
3h 42min
Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F
8500 mAh
Google Pixel C
 mAh
Apple iPad Pro 9.7
7306 mAh
Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet
 mAh
Lenovo Yoga Book 2016 Windows 64GB LTE
8500 mAh
Battery Runtime
12%
2%
-8%
-30%
Reader / Idle
1985
2090
5%
1850
-7%
2135
8%
1153
-42%
H.264
702
740
5%
708
1%
705
0%
WiFi v1.3
602
638
6%
779
29%
525
-13%
498
-17%
Load
222
294
32%
186
-16%
166
-25%

Pros

+ graphics tablet
+ lots of accessories
+ innovative input concept
+ useful Halo keyboard
+ very flexible, yet sturdy hinges
+ decent screen
+ barely heats up
+ good speakers

Cons

- Halo keyboard hard-to-read in bright lighting conditions
- graphics tablet has some flaws
- quiet creaking noises
- slightly superfluous software
- GPS module is unreliable
- only 12 months warranty

Verdict

In review: Yoga Book Android. Test model provided by Lenovo Germany.
In review: Yoga Book Android. Test model provided by Lenovo Germany.

The Yoga Book occupies a special place in our hearts and runs well even with Android. In fact, in some areas, it can even outperform the Windows tablet. The design of this device is unique and it is a true joy to see the "watchband" hinges in action. The backlit Halo keyboard looks great and works well in everyday use, but we recommend keeping the device out of sunny areas. Otherwise, you will soon be pining for a physical keyboard.

The Yoga Book does a great job digitizing notes. This is a great plus for professionals who take a lot of notes on-the-go and want a touchscreen and a graphics tablet simultaneously. The iPad Pro 9.7 cannot match this offering. Now and then, the test model took a little time to recognize content or execute an action. Professional users should take a little time to feel this device out (especially the graphics tablet) before handing their money over the counter.

The performance and the display are decent, but not extraordinary. They will suffice for everyday tasks. The screen may have too high color deviations for professional use. Thankfully, the device barely heats up and the full performance is always available. The good speakers, sturdy case and very flexible input devices round out the Lenovo Yoga Book Android.

We appreciate the long battery life. The Android bar has been adjusted so as to be functional and easy-to-use.

Practical, functional, flexible and without major flaws: the Yoga Book with Android is definitely a niche device, but it is a lot of fun to work with.

If you do not need Windows 10, we recommend taking a look at the Android version, as it can trump the Windows device in a few areas: battery life and display.

In summary, Lenovo is offering a unique tool for graphic designers, who want a portable tablet. The Yoga Book can also score in terms of design and looks, thanks to its fabulous case and unique hinges. The device offers all this without any major flaws. We strongly recommend potential tablet buyers to take a look at the Yoga Book Android.

Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F - 11/09/2016 v5.1(old)
Florian Wimmer

Chassis
91 / 98 → 93%
Keyboard
75%
Pointing Device
92%
Connectivity
43 / 80 → 54%
Weight
80 / 35-78 → 100%
Battery
93%
Display
84%
Games Performance
43 / 68 → 64%
Application Performance
51 / 87 → 59%
Temperature
95%
Noise
100%
Audio
63 / 91 → 69%
Camera
63 / 85 → 74%
Average
75%
88%
Convertible - Weighted Average

Pricecompare

Read all 2 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Lenovo Yoga Book Android YB1-X90F Convertible Review
Florian Wimmer, 2016-11-13 (Update: 2018-05-15)