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Laptops to grow 3.7 percent in PC market share by 2022 according to IDC

PC market anticipated to fall 3.8 percent by end of 2018 (Source: IDC)
PC market anticipated to fall 3.8 percent by end of 2018 (Source: IDC)
Sales of laptops, traditional PCs, and mobile workstations are expected to remain relatively flat for the next few years. Even so, the fast decline of traditional slate tablets will allow laptops and PCs to regain lost market share. Detachable tablets will continue to grow and eat up sales of slate tablets.

Analysts at market research firm IDC are sticking to their prediction of a shrinking PC market. The firm is forecasting a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of -1.8 percent from now until the end of 2022. If accurate, worldwide PC shipments by 2022 would be just 378.3 million compared to 407 million in 2018.

Much of the anticipated decline can be attributed to the disappointing sales of slate tablet PCs. These traditional tablets are losing ground to detachable tablets like the Microsoft Surface series where removable keyboards are an option. Slate tablets and detachable tablets are expected to contract by 5.8 percent and grow by 7.8 percent CAGR, respectively, through 2022.

It's not all doom and gloom, however, as IDC is predicting a slight recovery in 2019 due to new products from Apple, Microsoft, Samsung, and Google. Flexible displays and mobile Nvidia Turing are anticipated to make a splash at CES 2019 next month to entice both general consumers and hardcore gamers.

(Source: IDC)
(Source: IDC)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 12 > Laptops to grow 3.7 percent in PC market share by 2022 according to IDC
Allen Ngo, 2018-12- 9 (Update: 2018-12-10)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.