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LG G5 sales are purportedly not meeting expectations

LG G5 sales are purportedly not meeting expectations
LG G5 sales are purportedly not meeting expectations
Sales of the G5 are now expected to reach 2.2 million by the end of Q2 2016 down from a previous estimation of 3 million.

Although LG is a household name worldwide and one of the largest manufacturers of IPS displays, the South Korean company has been struggling in the smartphone market against the likes of Samsung and Apple. The company has always been in Samsung's shadow and this is becoming an even larger issue now that the Galaxy S7 has hit the market. According to Koreatimes, the G5 is struggling in sales and its modular design has been criticized as being too complicated and impractical. Unlike the recently unveiled Moto Z series, users must disconnect the module to charge the phone or swap batteries when changing accessories.

The struggling smartphone has also caused a shakeup in LG's mobile division as several managers have been dismissed and replaced by a new Program Management Office (PMO) team responsible for strategic product development and marketing who will report directly to the CEO. It remains to be seen if such a move can improve the bottom line as Chinese competitors continue to bring cheaper smartphones to market. LG currently holds just 4 percent of the smartphone market and lacks the deep pockets of Samsung for wider promotions and marketing.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > LG G5 sales are purportedly not meeting expectations
Benjamin Herzig/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07- 6 (Update: 2016-07- 6)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.