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Huawei reportedly circumvents US policy with its 100% in-house base station

Huawei's CEO presents on the OEM's 5G hardware strategy. (Source: Huawei)
Huawei's CEO presents on the OEM's 5G hardware strategy. (Source: Huawei)
Base stations are crucial pieces of hardware for mobile networks, particularly 5G ones. Huawei is now reportedly in a position to sell versions of these devices based on their own proprietary chipsets, rather than those made by US companies as before. Therefore, this country's administration's efforts to lock this OEM out of the 5G market appear to have been thwarted, at least in part.
Deirdre O Donnell,

Despite the US government's objections, many regional and national jurisdictions are reportedly taking up Huawei hardware in their enthusiasm to implement 5G networks as fast as possible. It has been believed that this line of business for the OEM would eventually be disrupted, however, as it would be unable to secure some components necessary to construct base stations, a critical component of the telecomms equipment in question.

Technology from US firms is normally required to complete these devices. However, Bloomberg has reported that a small percentage of the Huawei base stations sold in the last quarter of 2019 were 100% composed of non-American products. This means that the OEM may no longer be reliant on the usual suppliers to make and sell base stations.

According to the publication, about 50,000 of these base-stations were "free of U.S. technology". Then again, they make up approximately 8% of the total volume of this equipment shipped by Huawei as of early February 2020. The "new" base stations may be based on the Tianyi chipset, developed by the OEM for 5G base-stations in response to its disbarment from the US market.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 03 > Huawei reportedly circumvents US policy with its 100% in-house base station
Deirdre O Donnell, 2020-03- 2 (Update: 2020-03- 2)
Deirdre O'Donnell
I became a professional writer and editor shortly after graduation. My degrees are in biomedical sciences; however, they led to some experience in the biotech area, which convinced me of its potential to revolutionize our health, environment and lives in general. This developed into an all-consuming interest in more aspects of tech over time: I can never write enough on the latest electronics, gadgets and innovations. My other interests include imaging, astronomy, and streaming all the things. Oh, and coffee.