Notebookcheck

Huawei caught red-handed: The company has backdoor access to mobile networks worldwide

Huawei corporate logo on an office building, Huawei using backdoor to access global mobile networks February 2020 news
Huawei corporate logo on an office building
The latest Huawei-related security issue is huge and it's enough to describe it in a few words for everyone to figure out: for over a decade, the Chinese behemoth has been using backdoors intended for law enforcement to access mobile networks — and the sensitive/private information they carry — all over the world.
Codrut Nistor,

No matter how we like it or not, it is very likely that our private phone conversations are not that private. While it is not surprising to find out that backdoor access to mobile networks all over the world is possible and it all has been implemented for use by law enforcement agencies, it all changes when a tech company is involved. Even worse, we are talking about a tech company that has been through a serious technology ban last year — Huawei.

According to a fresh report that has just surfaced online (The Wall Street Journal article requires a subscription for full access), "Washington tries to persuade allies to exclude the Chinese company from their networks" because the Chinese tech giant — the provider for the underlying hardware solutions for many mobile networks all over the world — "can covertly access" these networks through means reserved for use by law enforcement.

National security adviser Robert O'Brien claims that the US authorities "have evidence that Huawei has the capability secretly to access sensitive and personal information in systems it maintains and sells around the world" but he fails to give them the benefit of doubt. Having a kitchen knife doesn't mean that you will use it to murder anyone, although that is something that can be done by anyone, so one big question remains: is Huawei headed towards a ban worse than the latest? 

For now, Huawei still has to issue an official statement, but they apparently rejected O'Brien's claims without going into the details. This is not something fresh, since the US claims to had noticed such access by Huawei starting back in 2009 across 4G equipment. These being said, we can only wonder why they waited an entire decade to make this public. As usual, the comments section is all yours, so feel free to share your thoughts with the rest of us: is this report making you change your opinion on Huawei and/or the US? How and why?

Source(s)

Read all 23 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 02 > Huawei caught red-handed: The company has backdoor access to mobile networks worldwide
Codrut Nistor, 2020-02-12 (Update: 2020-02-12)
Codrut Nistor
Codrut Nistor - News Editor
Although I have been writing about new software and hardware for almost a decade, I consider myself to be old school. I always enjoy listening to music on CD or tape instead of digital files and I will not even get into the touchscreen vs physical keys debate. However, I also enjoy new technology, as I now have the chance to take a look at the future every day. I joined the Notebookcheck crew back in 2013 and I have no plans to leave the ship anytime soon.