Notebookcheck

HP Pavilion 17t (7700HQ, UHD, GTX 1050) Laptop Review

Pascal Pavilion Premiere… A UHD configuration of the Pavilion 17t-ab200 we reviewed last month has made it through our labs… but are the extra display panel perks enough to put it over the top?

Just last month, we took a detailed look at the HP Pavilion 17t-ab200, which featured an Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPU and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 GPU. Today’s model is nearly identical in most every way except for a few key differences: the SSD is different (an Intel 256 GB model), it only includes half the RAM (8 GB DDR4 single-channel), and the display panel has seen a significant bump up to 4K resolution (from 1080p previously). Apart from that, nearly everything else about the machine remains consistent.

The GTX 1050 can certainly push basic video at 4K resolution, but whether or not it can handle any sort of gaming at that level is another question entirely. Let’s take a quick look at what’s new with this Pavilion 17t, after which we’ll dive more deeply into the question of gaming performance.

Since many components, such as casing, connectivity, and input devices have not changed since our previous review, we will not be covering those items again today. For much more information on any of those aspects of the Pavilion 17t, please see our review from last month.

HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
Graphics adapter
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 21.21.13.7682 - nVIDIA ForceWare 376.82
Memory
8192 MB 
, DDR4-2400 (single-channel)
Display
17.3 inch 16:9, 3840x2160 pixel 255 PPI, AUO119B, IPS, glossy: no
Mainboard
Intel Sunrise Point, Intel Kaby Lake-H
Storage
Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7, 256 GB 
Soundcard
Realtek ALC295 @ Intel Sunrise Point-LP PCH - High Definition Audio Controller
Connections
1 USB 2.0, 2 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: 3.5 mm combo audio, Card Reader: SD full-sized
Networking
Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller (10/100/1000MBit), Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265 (a/b/g/h/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.1
Optical drive
HP DVDRW GUD1N
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 32 x 419 x 288 ( = 1.26 x 16.5 x 11.34 in)
Battery
63 Wh Lithium-Ion
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 10 Home 64 Bit
Camera
Webcam: 720p HD
Primary Camera: 1 MPix
Additional features
Speakers: 2.0, Keyboard: Chiclet, Keyboard Light: yes, 12 Months Warranty
Weight
2.956 kg ( = 104.27 oz / 6.52 pounds), Power Supply: 428 g ( = 15.1 oz / 0.94 pounds)

 

Display

Subpixel array, Pavilion 17t UHD
Subpixel array, Pavilion 17t UHD

There is little doubt upon first glance that the Pavilion 17t’s UHD display looks much nicer than the 1080p panel we evaluated in our previous review. That isn’t to say that the 1080p display was bad, but it’s immediately obvious that the UHD version features better maximum brightness—and, of course, its contents appear much sharper, since it features a pixel density of 255 (much more reasonable than the 127 PPI of the previous model). At a screen size of 17.3 inches, a UHD panel really makes a difference.

294.7
cd/m²
322.7
cd/m²
297.9
cd/m²
300.7
cd/m²
325.7
cd/m²
300.3
cd/m²
311.9
cd/m²
307
cd/m²
316.7
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro Basic 2
Maximum: 325.7 cd/m² Average: 308.6 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 90 %
Center on Battery: 325.7 cd/m²
Contrast: 880:1 (Black: 0.37 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 6.5 | - Ø
ΔE Greyscale 5.6 | - Ø
100% sRGB (Argyll) 87% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll)
Gamma: 2.59
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
AUO119B, IPS, 17.3, 3840x2160
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
AUO109D, IPS, 17.3, 1920x1080
Gigabyte P57X v7
SHP145E, IPS, 17.3, 3840x2160
MSI GT73VR 6RF
IPS, 17.3, 3840x2160
Response Times
22%
-25%
22%
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
50.8
36.8
28%
55.6 (18.4, 37.2)
-9%
33.6 (13.2, 20.4)
34%
Response Time Black / White *
33.2
28
16%
46.8 (10.4, 36.4)
-41%
30 (5.2, 24.8)
10%
PWM Frequency
1000 (29)
Screen
-8%
9%
-3%
Brightness
309
265
-14%
408
32%
316
2%
Brightness Distribution
90
91
1%
86
-4%
87
-3%
Black Level *
0.37
0.28
24%
0.44
-19%
0.422
-14%
Contrast
880
996
13%
1003
14%
793
-10%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
6.5
5.8
11%
5.1
22%
4.11
37%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
5.6
8.3
-48%
4.3
23%
5.74
-3%
Gamma
2.59 93%
2.1 114%
2.08 115%
2.3 104%
CCT
5860 111%
5723 114%
7345 88%
5987 109%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
87
57
-34%
87
0%
60.5
-30%
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
100
87
-13%
100
0%
96
-4%
Total Average (Program / Settings)
7% / -2%
-8% / 2%
10% / 2%

* ... smaller is better

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We measured a peak brightness of 325.7 cd/m² and an average of 308.6 cd/m², well above the 1080p panel’s 265 cd/m². Thanks to a higher black level of 0.37 cd/m², contrast has actually decreased a bit to 880:1 (down from 996:1), but it isn’t really noticeable and it still looks great. Brightness distribution remains nearly identical at 90%, which is very good.

sRGB results have also improved. Whereas the previous HP Pavilion 17t managed an acceptable 87% coverage of the sRGB spectrum, the UHD iteration manages to cover the entire gamut (100%). AdobeRGB is even 87% covered, an excellent result which, pending an acceptable color accuracy performance, renders the Pavilion 17t UHD an appropriate candidate for graphics and photo editing enthusiasts.

vs. Gigabyte P57X v7
vs. Gigabyte P57X v7
vs. Pavilion 17t-ab200 1080p
vs. Pavilion 17t-ab200 1080p

To that end, CalMAN 5 revealed a ColorChecker DeltaE2000 of 6.5 and a Greyscale DeltaE2000 of 5.6, neither of which are great results—but at least those values can be calibrated downward (we managed to get them down to 4.1 and 1.3, respectively post-calibration). The CCT Average of 5860 is a bit on the warm side (ideal: 6500), and the total gamma of 2.59 is also somewhat high (ideal: 2.2).

Color analysis (pre-calibration)
Color analysis (pre-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (pre-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (pre-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (pre-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (pre-calibration)
Color analysis (post-calibration)
Color analysis (post-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (post-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (post-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (post-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (post-calibration)

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
33.2 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ ms rise
↘ ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 85 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (26.6 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
50.8 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ ms rise
↘ ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 84 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (42.5 ms).

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM not detected

In comparison: 54 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 8568 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 142900) Hz was measured.

Outdoors, the machine does fairly well thanks to a good brightness/contrast and an anti-glare panel finish. Viewing angles are also excellent, as is always the case for IPS screens.

In the sun
In the sun
In the shade
In the shade
Wide IPS viewing angles
Wide IPS viewing angles

Performance

The CPU and GPU in the Pavilion 17t-ab200 configuration we are reviewing today are both identical to those of the previous model: the Kaby Lake quad-core Intel Core i7-7700HQ and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050, both of which are more than capable. However, two significant differences exist elsewhere: RAM (which is now 8 GB single-channel versus 16 dual-channel previously) and storage (which has seen a jump to a 256 GB Intel SSD model over the previous 128 GB Samsung SSD). We will see how these changes affect performance in the coming sections.

A quick note about upgradeability: although we didn’t cover maintenance and upgrades in this article, the topic remains a challenge, as it was during our time with the previous configuration. Although it is indeed possible to upgrade the RAM and other components, disassembly of the Pavilion 17t is a rather delicate process thanks to the thin plastic from which the machine is constructed. For much more detail on this subject, please see our previous article.

CPU-Z CPU
CPU-Z CPU
CPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Memory
CPU-Z Memory
CPU-Z RAM SPD
CPU-Z RAM SPD
GPU-Z
GPU-Z
SpecViewperf
SpecViewperf
LatencyMon
LatencyMon

Processor

In our CPU benchmarks, the Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD didn’t do quite as well as its 1080p predecessor. Although the machine topped the charts among Core i7-7700HQ-equipped models in the Cinebench R15 single-core test, multi-core saw it drop down to the bottom spot with “just” 620 points. Similar results were seen from the R11.5 benchmarks, with a difference of between 17 and 19 percent separating the 1080p Pavilion and the UHD model we are evaluating today in single-core benchmarks. In Super Pi and wPrime, the gap was much smaller, at an almost negligible 3 percent. Regardless of what implications this might suggest in terms of real-world performance, it is important to note that these results are still very good overall, and that the average user is unlikely to really notice the difference even if one does happen to exist during their usage of the machine.

Cinebench R11.5
Cinebench R11.5
Cinebench R15
Cinebench R15
Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
MSI GT73VR 6RF
Intel Core i7-6820HK
164 Points ∼82% +4%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
158 Points ∼79%
Gigabyte P57X v7
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
152 Points ∼76% -4%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
151 Points ∼76% -4%
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
149 Points ∼75% -6%
CPU Multi 64Bit
MSI GT73VR 6RF
Intel Core i7-6820HK
836 Points ∼39% +35%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
740 Points ∼34% +19%
Gigabyte P57X v7
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
736 Points ∼34% +19%
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
686 Points ∼32% +11%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
620 Points ∼29%
Cinebench R11.5
CPU Single 64Bit
MSI GT73VR 6RF
Intel Core i7-6820HK
1.88 Points ∼83% +4%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
1.8 Points ∼79%
Gigabyte P57X v7
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
1.71 Points ∼75% -5%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
1.71 Points ∼75% -5%
CPU Multi 64Bit
MSI GT73VR 6RF
Intel Core i7-6820HK
9.24 Points ∼4% +33%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
8.15 Points ∼3% +17%
Gigabyte P57X v7
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
8.04 Points ∼3% +16%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
6.96 Points ∼3%
wPrime 2.0x - 1024m
Gigabyte P57X v7
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
340.3 s * ∼4% -0%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
339 s * ∼4%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
329 s * ∼4% +3%
Super Pi Mod 1.5 XS 32M - ---
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
565 Seconds * ∼3%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
547 Seconds * ∼2% +3%
Gigabyte P57X v7
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
546 Seconds * ∼2% +3%

* ... smaller is better

Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
1.8 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
6.96 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
54.51 fps
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
158 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
620 Points
Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit
80.53 fps
Cinebench R15 Ref. Match 64Bit
99.6 %
Help
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Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64 Bit

System Performance

Similar results were encountered during our PCMark synthetic benchmarks. PCMark 8 scored the Pavilion 17t UHD model between 18 and 38 percent lower than it did the 1080p counterpart in Creative and Home Accelerated v2 benchmarks. Work Accelerated was even lower, with a puzzling score of just 2213 (however, this is consistent with other Pavilions we are currently reviewing, so it seems to be accurate). It should be noted that these benchmarks are known to penalize higher-resolution configurations, so the results must be taken with a grain of salt.

Instead, a much more disconcerting observation was derived from our actual time spent using the machine. In our review of the 1080p model, we mentioned conspicuous hiccups during general operation of the machine during periods of moderate stress (normal operation), where the mouse cursor would periodically stop responding for a fraction of a second. This happened fairly frequently also on our 17t UHD configuration, as well as on a third Pavilion we are currently evaluating—the Pavilion 15t. This leads us to conclude that there must, in fact, be some sort of problem with these machines from the factory which is hampering performance and producing these irritating hiccups.

Furthermore, we were completely unable to provoke the machine to complete a battery benchmark; when unplugged, the device would simply crash, throwing a DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE error, which is often indicative of a driver or hardware issue, but which also can reference a firmware-level problem (such as switchable graphics handling issues or S3 sleep state transition troubles).

After a bit of research and digging through Event Logs and other sources of evidence, we encountered no useful solutions. Eventually, the problems were mostly resolved however (at least, the stability-oriented ones), and the solution was the F.35 BIOS update (posted March 22, 2017) on the official HP Support and Drivers page for these models. After applying the update to all of the machines, the battery benchmarks completed normally, though the incidence of hangs and other random hiccups was seemingly unaffected.

PCMark 8 Home Accelerated
PCMark 8 Home Accelerated
PCMark 8 Creative Accelerated
PCMark 8 Creative Accelerated
PCMark 8
Work Score Accelerated v2
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Samsung CM871a MZNTY128HDHP
5214 Points ∼80% +136%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
4378 Points ∼67% +98%
Gigabyte P57X v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Transcend MTS800 256GB M.2 (TS256GMTS800)
4218 Points ∼65% +91%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
2213 Points ∼34%
Creative Score Accelerated v2
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
8227 Points ∼88% +82%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Samsung CM871a MZNTY128HDHP
5310 Points ∼57% +18%
Gigabyte P57X v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Transcend MTS800 256GB M.2 (TS256GMTS800)
5161 Points ∼55% +14%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
4516 Points ∼49%
Home Score Accelerated v2
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
4252 Points ∼71% +39%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Samsung CM871a MZNTY128HDHP
4212 Points ∼70% +38%
Gigabyte P57X v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Transcend MTS800 256GB M.2 (TS256GMTS800)
3569 Points ∼60% +17%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
3056 Points ∼51%
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7
3038 Points ∼51% -1%
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
3056 points
PCMark 8 Creative Score Accelerated v2
4516 points
PCMark 8 Work Score Accelerated v2
2213 points
Help

Storage Devices

As previously mentioned, one of the other differences between today’s configuration and the previous 1080p model we evaluated is the storage drive. Here, replacing the previous Samsung CM871a SSD, we have an Intel 600p SSDPEKKW256G7, which is a 256 GB M.2 80mm PCIe 3.0 x4 drive. Though it doesn’t post as impressive sequential read/write numbers as the Toshiba and SanDisk NVMe drives in the Acer and MSI competitors, its 4K performance is commendable, and it is a notable step up regardless from the Samsung CM871a in the 1080p Pavilion 17t.

Sequential read/write as measured by AS SSD was 1378 MB/s and 567 MB/s respectively. While not the fastest we’ve seen, those are great results by any measure.

AS SSD
AS SSD
CrystalDiskMark
CrystalDiskMark
HD Tune
HD Tune
PCMark 8 Storage Accelerated
PCMark 8 Storage Accelerated
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
Samsung CM871a MZNTY128HDHP
Gigabyte P57X v7
Transcend MTS800 256GB M.2 (TS256GMTS800)
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7
MSI GT73VR 6RF
2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
CrystalDiskMark 3.0
-16%
-19%
59%
50%
Write 4k QD32
405.2
132.5
-67%
296
-27%
419.8
4%
441.8
9%
Read 4k QD32
282.7
399
41%
281.3
0%
573.3
103%
425
50%
Write 4k
116.2
85.32
-27%
82.25
-29%
59.76
-49%
65.68
-43%
Read 4k
20.09
32.7
63%
26.04
30%
21.04
5%
31.37
56%
Write 512
472.3
118.5
-75%
306.1
-35%
878
86%
915.8
94%
Read 512
694.6
376.2
-46%
315
-55%
760.1
9%
698.1
1%
Write Seq
263.2
353.6
34%
305.7
16%
1073
308%
916.1
248%
Read Seq
1076
520
-52%
516.8
-52%
1172
9%
914.3
-15%
Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
Transfer Rate Minimum: 153.6 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 698.9 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 409 MB/s
Access Time: 0.1 ms
Burst Rate: 278.4 MB/s
CPU Usage: 3.2 %

GPU Performance

We provided lower-resolution benchmarks with more reasonable settings in our previous Pavilion 17t review, and since both machines share the same CPU (Core i7-7700HQ) and GPU (NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050), we focused today on benchmarks at the native resolution of the upgraded panel in this configuration. Specifically, to review, that’s 4K—and as we touched upon earlier, we doubt that the GTX 1050 can handle most games at this resolution.

Indeed, apart from BioShock Infinite (101 fps), Batman: Arkham Knight, DOOM, and Rise of the Tomb Raider all came in at under 15 fps while equipped with our typical 4K benchmark settings (High/Ultra depending on the game). This calls into question the appeal of the upgraded panel unless the user really just feels the need for the increased resolution and somewhat superior picture quality elsewhere—because it isn’t likely that they’ll be playing any games above 1080p resolution anyway.

3DMark 11
1280x720 Performance Combined
Gigabyte P57X v7
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ
9116 Points ∼52% +35%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
8705 Points ∼50% +29%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ
7440 Points ∼42% +10%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ
6743 Points ∼38%
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
6319 Points ∼36% -6%
1280x720 Performance GPU
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
27685 Points ∼54% +253%
Gigabyte P57X v7
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ
23243 Points ∼46% +196%
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
15256 Points ∼30% +95%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ
7840 Points ∼15%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ
7649 Points ∼15% -2%
3DMark
1920x1080 Fire Strike Graphics
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
21270 Points ∼52% +252%
Gigabyte P57X v7
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ
17170 Points ∼42% +184%
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
11160 Points ∼27% +85%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ
6041 Points ∼15%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ
5961 Points ∼15% -1%
1280x720 Cloud Gate Standard Graphics
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
103913 Points ∼64% +594%
Gigabyte P57X v7
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ
75190 Points ∼46% +402%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ
37573 Points ∼23% +151%
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
26770 Points ∼16% +79%
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ
14979 Points ∼9%
3DMark 06 Standard
25817 points
3DMark 11 Performance
7554 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score
11692 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score
11173 points
3DMark Fire Strike Score
5383 points
Help
Rise of the Tomb Raider - 3840x2160 High Preset AA:FX AF:4x (sort by value)
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
12 fps ∼15%
Gigabyte P57X v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Transcend MTS800 256GB M.2 (TS256GMTS800)
43 fps ∼55% +258%
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7
24.9 fps ∼32% +108%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
49.8 fps ∼64% +315%
Doom - 3840x2160 High Preset AA:FX (sort by value)
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
15 fps ∼15%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
64.1 fps ∼65% +327%
Batman: Arkham Knight - 3840x2160 High / On (Interactive Smoke & Paper Debris Off) AA:SM AF:8x (sort by value)
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
13 fps ∼22%
Gigabyte P57X v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Transcend MTS800 256GB M.2 (TS256GMTS800)
47 fps ∼81% +262%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
52 fps ∼90% +300%
low med. high ultra4K
Batman: Arkham Knight (2015) 13fps
Rise of the Tomb Raider (2016) 12fps
Doom (2016) 15fps

Stress Test

Combined system stress
Combined system stress

Our stress tests revealed an inability to maintain Turbo clock rates for any significant period of time when met with synthetic stress from FurMark and Prime95. The CPU alone when stressed achieved just 2.7 GHz (dipping shortly thereafter to 2.5 GHz), and when combined, it settled at 2.2 GHz with the GPU wildly jumping around in the 1100 MHz to 1350 MHz range. Temperatures throughout this process remained thoroughly reasonable at just 69 °C for the CPU and 63 °C for GPU.

A more realistic, recent addition to our testing repertoire is a series of consecutive Cinebench R15 multi-CPU benchmarks. We perform the tests one after another for a lengthy period of time—around half an hour—and chart the trends in terms of overall score differences. Any decrease over time in the score should indicate a likely inability to maintain high performance during lengthier periods of real-world stress. Unfortunately, the Pavilion 17t suffers this fate, with an initial score of 555.64 immediately giving way to scores in the 508 – 517 range. That’s a decrease of around 8 percent, which seems consistent with our observations during the synthetic stress testing. Even stranger, however, is the fact that none of these scores is as high as the original score we received of 620. These laptops seem to be subject to random firmware-level limitations in terms of CPU and GPU performance that are both puzzling and terribly unfortunate—and the latest BIOS seemingly has failed to correct this problem.

CPU Clock (GHz) GPU Clock (MHz) Average CPU Temperature (°C) Average GPU Temperature (°C)
Prime95 Stress 2.5 - 69 -
FurMark Stress - 1100 - 63
Prime95 + FurMark Stress 2.2 1100 69 63

Emissions

System Noise

The Pavilion 17t we reviewed last month was a very noisy machine, and this latest configuration, even with the updated firmware, provides no solace. While merely idling, the machine produced some 34.5 dB(A) on average with a 36.6 dB(A) maximum—some roughly 5 to 7 dB(A) above environmental noise levels. Under load, it’s of course quite a bit louder than that, with an average of 46.6 dB(A) and a maximum of 52.3 dB(A), the latter of which is the highest of any of the machines in today’s comparison. As before, we should expect such aggressively high fan speeds to produce correspondingly lower surface temperatures, which we’ll explore in our next section.

Noise Level

Idle
34.5 / 34.5 / 36.6 dB(A)
DVD
36.6 / dB(A)
Load
46.6 / 52.3 dB(A)
 
 
 
30 dB
silent
40 dB(A)
audible
50 dB(A)
loud
 
min: dark, med: mid, max: light   BK Precision 732A (15 cm distance)   environment noise: 29.6 dB(A)
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 7700HQ, Samsung CM871a MZNTY128HDHP
Gigabyte P57X v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Transcend MTS800 256GB M.2 (TS256GMTS800)
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
Noise
-1%
6%
-2%
off / environment *
29.6
30.8
-4%
29
2%
29.2
1%
Idle Minimum *
34.5
35.3
-2%
30.4
12%
32
7%
Idle Average *
34.5
35.4
-3%
32.1
7%
32
7%
Idle Maximum *
36.6
35.4
3%
32.1
12%
35
4%
Load Average *
46.6
48.6
-4%
45.6
2%
50
-7%
Load Maximum *
52.3
49.8
5%
51.5
2%
64
-22%

* ... smaller is better

Temperature

Thankfully, that is indeed the case. Barring two isolated hot spots on the top center of the base unit (coming in at 48.8 °C and 46.4 °C), average temperature readings on the top and bottom of the unit during stress were still just 32.6 °C and 26.9 °C, respectively. Those same regions exhibited a nearly-indiscernible increase over environmental room temperatures while idling, with just 22.2 °C and 21.9 °C (as compared to a 20 °C room temperature, which makes for average margins of just 2.2 °C and 1.9 °C—practically nothing at all).

Max. Load
 24 °C48.8 °C32.4 °C 
 25.4 °C46.4 °C34.2 °C 
 23.8 °C31 °C27 °C 
Maximum: 48.8 °C
Average: 32.6 °C
38.4 °C27.4 °C21.6 °C
29.2 °C26.4 °C22 °C
23.8 °C29 °C24.2 °C
Maximum: 38.4 °C
Average: 26.9 °C
Power Supply (max.)  47 °C | Room Temperature 20 °C | Fluke 62 Mini IR Thermometer
Thermal profile, top of base unit
Thermal profile, top of base unit
Thermal profile, underside
Thermal profile, underside

Speakers

As before, the Pavilion 17t’s speakers are nothing special. We noted weak bass and passable highs with a decent reproduction of midrange frequencies. Most devices in this category fare notably better, and the various options for post-processing only marginally affect the overall experience on the 17t. Volume levels are at least fairly good, however.

dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2039.432.739.42535.332.135.33136.332.336.34033.532.233.55033.231.633.26333.932.533.98039.130.139.110039.53139.512540.530.840.516037.728.937.72004627.44625053.726.853.731555.526.755.540055.326.655.350058.824.958.863061.125.461.180059.225.459.2100061.724.961.7125064.625.164.6160064.624.664.6200063.323.463.3250061.323.661.3315059.322.859.3400061.622.961.6500063.422.963.4630063.922.763.9800054.222.854.21000054.522.854.51250048.822.948.81600037.422.937.4SPL73.936.273.9N33.42.633.4median 58.8HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHDmedian 24.9median 58.8Delta6.62.16.638.840.435.137.334.938.23535.334.234.433.134.73341.931.947.730.948.929.456.129.455.828.857.227.459.426.960.125.857.525.565.124.968.124.967.92564.424.863.624.464.323.663.523.560.423.572.423.571.223.368.723.366.523.362.423.247.923.43236.679.12.845median 24.9MSI GT73VR 6RFmedian 62.42.54.4hearing rangehide median Pink Noise
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD audio analysis

(±) | speaker loudness is average but good (73.89 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(±) | reduced bass - on average 13.3% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (10.8% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 3.1% away from median
(+) | mids are linear (5.4% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 3.5% away from median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (7.8% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (20.6% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 67% of all tested devices in this class were better, 7% similar, 26% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 17%, worst was 35%
Compared to all devices tested
» 44% of all tested devices were better, 7% similar, 49% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

MSI GT73VR 6RF audio analysis

(±) | speaker loudness is average but good (79.09 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(±) | reduced bass - on average 8.2% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (8% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 3.3% away from median
(+) | mids are linear (6.4% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 4.6% away from median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (9.9% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (17.7% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 52% of all tested devices in this class were better, 6% similar, 42% worse
» The best had a delta of 6%, average was 18%, worst was 37%
Compared to all devices tested
» 30% of all tested devices were better, 5% similar, 65% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Frequency Comparison (Checkbox selectable!)
Graph 1: Pink Noise 100% Vol.; Graph 2: Audio off

Energy Management

Power Consumption

The brighter and higher-resolution UHD panel in our newest Pavilion 17t review unit is a rather lopsided exchange in terms of energy consumption for the reduction in a mere single stick of DDR4 memory otherwise. Thus, predictably, the newer 17t is a much hungrier unit overall—at least, while idling, where we measured a minimum power consumption of 13.3 W and an average of 18.5 W (much higher than the 8.2 W / 11 W seen on our 1080p-equipped 17t, and much closer to the Gigabyte P57X v7, which also packs a 4K display). Load averages and maximums do not show any increase, however, suggesting a firmware-level limitation of power consumption. Nevertheless, we are thus likely to see an appreciable decrease in normal-use battery life (while web surfing, etc.) even if load results don’t show much of a variance.

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0.26 / 0.38 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 13.3 / 18.5 / 19 Watt
Load midlight 78 / 113.4 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW256G7, IPS, 3840x2160, 17.3
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), Samsung CM871a MZNTY128HDHP, IPS, 1920x1080, 17.3
Gigabyte P57X v7
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), Transcend MTS800 256GB M.2 (TS256GMTS800), IPS, 3840x2160, 17.3
MSI GT73VR 6RF
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0), IPS, 3840x2160, 17.3
Power Consumption
24%
-62%
-122%
Idle Minimum *
13.3
8.2
38%
15.7
-18%
28.9
-117%
Idle Average *
18.5
11
41%
23.4
-26%
30.6
-65%
Idle Maximum *
19
11.1
42%
23.5
-24%
33.1
-74%
Load Average *
78
77
1%
184.6
-137%
224.4
-188%
Load Maximum *
113.4
116.9
-3%
233.1
-106%
302.6
-167%

* ... smaller is better

Battery Life

And that’s precisely what transpires. After struggling through some serious challenges with our battery benchmarks related to system stability (see the System Performance section above for more details on this), we eventually received reliable battery runtime results for the Pavilion 17t UHD and other affected models (oddly enough, we experienced no such struggles with the previous 17t, though the performance hiccups were still present). Battery life is quite a bit shorter than that of the 1080p-equipped model, as expected, under general use. However, under load, both machines manage similar runtimes—which is in line with our previous power consumption measurements/observations.

Battery Eater Classic Test
Battery Eater Classic Test
Battery Eater Readers Test
Battery Eater Readers Test
Surfing with Wi-Fi
Surfing with Wi-Fi
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
8h 53min
WiFi Surfing v1.3
4h 46min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 22min
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 63 Wh
HP Pavilion 17t-ab200
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1050 (Notebook), 62 Wh
Gigabyte P57X v7
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 75.81 Wh
Acer Aspire V17 Nitro BE VN7-793G-706L
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 69 Wh
MSI GT73VR 6RF
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 75.2 Wh
Battery Runtime
32%
-26%
-21%
-32%
Reader / Idle
533
691
30%
256
-52%
306
-43%
WiFi v1.3
286
409
43%
155
-46%
225
-21%
198
-31%
Load
82
102
24%
98
20%
65
-21%

Pros

+ beautiful UHD screen with good color gamut coverage and brightness
+ reasonable operating temperatures
+ decent performance for the cost, hiccups notwithstanding

Cons

- flimsy plastic casing
- poor touchpad
- random hiccups during operation
- arbitrary performance throttling even when temperature is not an issue
- significant performance reduction under sustained load
- middling application performance
- relatively noisy operation
- unnecessarily challenging maintenance

Verdict

In review: the HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD. Test model provided by Computer Upgrade King. Use coupon code Pav100NBC to get $100 USD off
In review: the HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD. Test model provided by Computer Upgrade King. Use coupon code Pav100NBC to get $100 USD off

Whereas the Pavilion 17t we reviewed last month, for all its struggles, seemed a plausible candidate for a mobile gaming enthusiast on a serious budget, this latest machine comes off as considerably more lopsided in terms of its strengths and weaknesses. Although the GPU and other components remain mostly consistent with those of the previous configuration, some power/firmware limitations result in lower performance than what we measured on the 1080p model, and the higher-resolution screen—while undeniably more attractive—means that gaming at native resolution with respectable settings and frame rates is a near-impossibility with the GTX 1050 at the helm. This is a great example of a situation where more is less—since the very specific slice of the market which would be likely to find the Pavilion 17t appealing for one of their interests would probably not see any reason to pay a substantially higher price for a panel upgrade which they would not be able to leverage during gaming anyway.

Then comes the question of photo and video editing enthusiasts, since the UHD panel does provide very good color gamut coverage and much better brightness and resolution than its 1080p counterpart. However, far better machines exist for such purposes, and considering the relatively severe stability issues we’ve encountered with the 17t during our testing period (including the performance hiccups, which still remain to some degree even after the firmware upgrade), if you’re going to shell out a moderate investment to help support a photo or video editing hobby, you’d be wise not to settle for a machine with a history of other related problems no matter what the savings.

If, even after taking into account its myriad issues, the Pavilion 17t is still being considered, it is imperative to apply BIOS F.35 REV A at the outset to correct some of the most glaring stability problems.   

And let’s not forget about all of the other negatives which plague this particular model, including the thin plastic casing, challenging maintenance, poor touchpad, weak port selection, and noisy operation. The bottom line is that you don’t even have to look any further than other HP machines to find far better options for just about any purpose—anything from an HP Spectre to a Dell XPS 15 or Lenovo Yoga 720, while notably pricier, would be a much better choice for the purpose. The Pavilion 17t is one laptop which we can enthusiastically encourage you to skip.

HP Pavilion 17t-ab200 UHD - 03/27/2017 v6
Steve Schardein

Chassis
55 / 98 → 56%
Keyboard
71%
Pointing Device
61%
Connectivity
50 / 81 → 62%
Weight
57 / 67 → 79%
Battery
80%
Display
88%
Games Performance
76 / 85 → 89%
Application Performance
76 / 92 → 83%
Temperature
93%
Noise
63 / 95 → 66%
Audio
50%
Camera
57 / 85 → 67%
Average
67%
76%
Multimedia - Weighted Average

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > HP Pavilion 17t (7700HQ, UHD, GTX 1050) Laptop Review
Steve Schardein, 2017-03-29 (Update: 2017-03-30)
Steve Schardein
Steve Schardein - Review Editor - @othersteve
In grade school, my first computer—an Apple IIGS—started it all for me. Later, in the nineties, if I wasn’t repairing computers for family and friends, I was busy cooking up nifty Visual Basic projects and playing PC games like Command & Conquer and Heroes of Might and Magic. Soon, much of my free time was spent moderating popular gaming forums and covering the industry for various websites. All the while, I never stopped repairing computers, and in 2006, I started a technology consulting company in Louisville, KY—Triple-S Computers—which I have been fortunate to nurture to great success by specializing in not only repairs, but also new machine consultations and purchasing, data recovery, and malware/security. And since 2012, I have proudly contributed many dozens of reviews to Notebookcheck, a site which I have long considered to be the ultimate authority on laptops and related technology. Today, I am truly living my dream: still a child at heart, ever-curious, constantly learning, and thankful to you, our readers.