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HP Pavilion 15 "Gaming Edition" may be coming this March

HP Pavilion 15 "Gaming Edition" may be coming this March
HP Pavilion 15 "Gaming Edition" may be coming this March
HP may unveil a new gamer-centric variant for its popular Pavilion 15 at this year's IFA

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Our colleagues over at tec2.hu claim that HP is at the cusp of announcing a Pavilion 15 with Omen-like features to take advantage of the growing mobile gaming market. The black chassis will include a Green chain fence pattern around the wrist rests with green keyboard backlighting as well.

Internally, the new model will supposedly house an Intel quad-core i7-6700HQ and an Nvidia GTX 950M. If true, then this would already exceed the graphics performance of the current highest configuration of the Pavilion 15 as the GT 940M is its most powerful option. The GTX 950M is capable of smooth playback of recent games such as Batman: Arkham Knight or The Witcher 3 at respectable 1080p settings. See our dedicated GPU page for more benchmarks on the 950M.

Other features include a FHD screen, HDD and SSD options, Windows 10, and a RealSense 3D camera with Bang & Olufsen speakers. Our source expects this to launch early next year and a quick look at the current Pavilion 15 starting prices suggests that the Pavilion 15 "Gaming Edition" will start at around 1000 Euros.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 09 > HP Pavilion 15 "Gaming Edition" may be coming this March
J. Simon Leitner/ Allen Ngo, 2015-09- 1 (Update: 2015-09- 1)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.