Notebookcheck

HP EliteBook 1030 G1 Subnotebook Review

Till Schönborn, Tanja Hinum (translated by Andreas Osthoff), 08/21/2016

Happy without a fan. Despite its passively cooled Core-m processor, the EliteBook 1030 G1 can convince with excellent application performance, great input devices and a bright IPS display. Did HP create the new reference in the subnotebook segment?

For the original German review, see here.

Thinner, lighter, and more stamina: Classic-bulky full-size notebooks are also a thing of the past in the business segment, and highly mobile Ultrabooks are starting to dominate the market. Manufacturers tend to use passively cooled Core m chips more often to reduce the size and the emissions even further.

After we recently reviewed the slimmed-down HP EliteBook Folio G1 (12.5-inch), we are now looking at the slightly bigger 13-inch sibling EliteBook 1030 G1. It is also based on the previously mentioned Core m CPUs from the Skylake generation, which are supposed to provide sufficient performance in combination with up to 16 GB RAM and 512 GB SSD storage. The impressive QHD+ touchscreen supports the high-end orientation of the device, which starts at 1,500 Euros (~$1697). Our top model with the Core m7 chip and the maximum memory equipment even retails for about 2,000 Euros (~$2263).

Rivals for the EliteBook include the Dell Latitude 13 7370 with a very similar concept to the 1030 G1. Actively cooled models like the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon or the Toshiba Portege Z30-C might be interesting alternatives as well.

HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Graphics adapter
Intel HD Graphics 515, Core: 300 - 1000 MHz, 20.19.15.4331
Memory
16384 MB 
, LPDDR3-1866, Dual-Channel, soldered
Display
13.3 inch 16:9, 3200 x 1800 pixel 276 PPI, capacitive, Sharp SHP1465, IPS, LED-Backlight, glossy: yes
Mainboard
Intel Skylake-Y Premium PCH
Storage
Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-512G-1006, 512 GB 
Soundcard
Intel Skylake-U/Y PCH - High Definition Audio
Connections
3 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: Headset jack (3.5 mm), 1 Fingerprint Reader, NFC
Networking
Intel Ethernet Connection I219-LM (10/100/1000MBit), Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 (a/b/g/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.2
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 15.7 x 310 x 210 ( = 0.62 x 12.2 x 8.27 in)
Battery
40 Wh Lithium-Ion, 4 cells, non-removable
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit
Camera
Webcam: 720p
Additional features
Speakers: Bang & Olufsen (Stereo), Keyboard: Chiclet, 45-Watt PSU, 36 Months Warranty, fanless
Weight
1.16 kg ( = 40.92 oz / 2.56 pounds), Power Supply: 230 g ( = 8.11 oz / 0.51 pounds)
Price
2000 Euro
Note: The manufacturer may use components from different suppliers including display panels, drives or memory sticks with similar specifications.

 

Case

The EliteBook is visually very appealing with its CNC-milled aluminum chassis and does not have to hide behind the cases from Apple. The use of noble light-alloy is not only for the design though, but it also has some practical advantages: It improves the heat dissipation and the stability of the chassis is excellent despite the small dimensions – the 1030 G1 is just 15.7 millimeters thick and tips the scale at 1.16 kilograms. Even unrealistically high pressure can just slightly twist the base and the display, and the same applies for concentrated pressure. As is typical in this class, the manufacturer also advertises that the device was tested according to military specs (MIL-STD).

You can expect quite a bit from a notebook for 2,000 Euros (~$2263) in terms of build quality – and our test sample does not disappoint. It does not matter if you look at the precisely polished edge at the top of the base unit or the perfect gaps all around, we cannot find the smallest issue on the EliteBook. Even the screwed bottom cover is seamlessly integrated into the chassis and you would have a hard time to insert a sheet of paper. In combination with the extremely precise display hinges, which can be operated with one hand (maximum opening angle: around 130 degrees), HP really delivered a more than convincing overall package.

Size Comparison

333 mm / 13.1 inch 229 mm / 9.02 inch 16.5 mm / 0.65 inch 1.2 kg2.64 lbs316 mm / 12.4 inch 227 mm / 8.94 inch 18 mm / 0.709 inch 1.2 kg2.65 lbs310 mm / 12.2 inch 210 mm / 8.27 inch 15.7 mm / 0.618 inch 1.2 kg2.56 lbs305 mm / 12 inch 211 mm / 8.31 inch 14.3 mm / 0.563 inch 1.2 kg2.75 lbs292 mm / 11.5 inch 209 mm / 8.23 inch 12.4 mm / 0.4882 inch 979 g2.16 lbs

Connectivity

Obviously, you cannot expect any connectivity miracles when you use a very mobile subnotebook, but the EliteBook does provide all the essential ports for productive usage. Besides three USB 3.0 ports (one with a Type-C connector), you also get HDMI-out as well as a Kensington lock and a headset jack. Gigabit Ethernet or DisplayPort – necessary for 4k monitors at 60 Hz – have to be realized via the additional docking station though. The "HP UltraSlim Docking Station" offers many ports for 125 Euros (~$141) and is particularly recommended if you want to use the 1030 G1 stationary on a regular basis.

Left side: Kensington lock, HDMI, USB 3.0, USB 3.0 Type-C
Left side: Kensington lock, HDMI, USB 3.0, USB 3.0 Type-C
Right side: headset jack, USB 3.0, docking port, AC power
Right side: headset jack, USB 3.0, docking port, AC power

Communication

An integrated LTE module is unfortunately not available for the EliteBook, not even as an option, so you have to live with Bluetooth 4.2 as well as WLAN according to the standards 802.11a/b/g/n/ac. The corresponding wireless adapter Intel Wireless-AC 8260 (2x2 Dual-Stream, up to 867 Mbps) works really well and ensures a stable and fast connection even over longer distances. We managed an excellent transfer rate of about 76 MB/s in combination with our test router Linksys EA8500 under perfect conditions.

HP implements the usual 0.9 MP webcam which creates noisy pictures with few details. The performance is still sufficient for video chats, especially since the quality of the corresponding dual-array microphone leaves a much better impression.

Networking
iperf Server (receive) TCP 1 m
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Broadcom 802.11ac
570 MBit/s ∼100%
iperf Client (transmit) TCP 1 m
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Broadcom 802.11ac
397 MBit/s ∼100%

Security

Thanks to features like TPM, NFC and optional drive encryption, the 1030 G1 meets the essential requirements for use in productive environments. You obviously get a fingerprint scanner as well, which is still based on the classic swipe-principle – Lenovo and Dell on the other hand already use the faster touch technology.

Accessories

Except for a compact 45-Watt power adapter and some brochures, there are no accessories in the box. There is no recovery disc, either. HP reserves about 16 GB of the SSD for the recovery partition instead.

Maintenance

Limited maintainability
Limited maintainability

After you loosen a total of 11 Torx-T8 screws, it is no problem to remove the large bottom panel of the notebook. This is commendable, but it won't be necessary very often – the CPU and memory are soldered onto the motherboard and there is no fan you could clean. You will still be happy about the easy access if you want to replace the SSD or WLAN card and the battery.

Warranty

HP grants a 3-year manufacturer's warranty by default and – which is not a matter of course – it even includes the battery. Other upgrades are sold as so-called "CarePacks", which can extend the scope or the period of the warranty. A package with two additional years and base support (pickup & return service) is available for a reasonable price of 209 Euros (~$236).

Input Devices

Keyboard

Except for some smaller layout adjustments, the keyboard has similar strengths compared to other EliteBooks like the recently reviewed Folio G1. High-quality plastic, a flawless build quality as well as the excellent stability once again leave a great first impression, which is also confirmed in practice: Even though the travel is a bit shorter compared to similar ThinkPads, the extremely firm stroke certainly does not have to hide behind the rivals. The keys (15 x 15 mm) also react well in the peripheral areas and there are no problems with clattering or stuck keys as known from many cheap keyboards. This not only results in fast typing speeds with a low number of typos but also a conveniently quiet typing noise. You can light up the keyboard with a two-stage white LED backlight in dark environments.

Touchpad

The touchpad is not very generously-sized at 9.5 x 5.5 centimeters, but there is still sufficient room for ergonomic handling when you consider the screen size. We particularly liked the very good gliding capabilities of the surface and the sensitive recognition of multi-touch gestures (up to three fingers), which can be configured individually in the driver panel. Thanks to inertial scrolling support, scrolling through long websites or PDF documents is often even more comfortable compared to an external mouse.

There are no dedicated mouse buttons on the 1030 G1; HP implements a fully integrated ClickPad design instead. While we criticize this decision in many of our reviews, the implementation of the EliteBook works really well: We could not determine cursor jumps during clicking and you do not lose the object during drag'n'drop. Manufacturer Alps also did a good job with the short travel and the conveniently firm pressure point.

Touchscreen

Our test model is equipped with a glossy QHD+ display, which comes with a capacitive touchscreen by default. Whether you really need it is another question, but there is at least no criticism for the basic functionality with quick execution of inputs and decent precision.

Keyboard
Keyboard
Touchpad
Touchpad

Display

Subpixel array
Subpixel array

At 3200x1800 pixels, the 13.3-inch display of the EliteBook has a higher resolution than some 30-inch monitors – this results in an impressive pixel density of 276 PPI. Sharpness and details are therefore excellent, but you are basically forced to use a scaling factor of at least 150%. This generally works pretty well with Windows 10, only some older applications can still have problems with extremely high resolutions. HP currently does not offer any other screen options for the 1030 G1, but a matte Full HD panel was already announced.

Not only the extremely sharp picture is an advantage of the panel: At almost 370 cd/m² it is also one of the brightest displays in this format right now. It is therefore usually no problem to reduce the luminance by a couple of levels most of the time, and there is no PWM flickering at any level. Only the minimum luminance at 18 cd/m² is a bit too high and the brightness distribution is not quite perfect, either.

Thanks to the IPS panel and a low black value of just 0.35 cd/m², dark picture content is conveniently rich. The resulting contrast ratio of 1146:1 represents what is currently possible with the LCD technology; much higher values would only be possible with OLED screens, which are still extremely expensive right now.

342
cd/m²
364
cd/m²
355
cd/m²
366
cd/m²
401
cd/m²
395
cd/m²
358
cd/m²
368
cd/m²
375
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro 2
Maximum: 401 cd/m² Average: 369.3 cd/m² Minimum: 18 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 85 %
Center on Battery: 399 cd/m²
Contrast: 1146:1 (Black: 0.35 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 3.5 | 0.6-29.43 Ø6.1
ΔE Greyscale 4.13 | 0.64-98 Ø6.3
94.64% sRGB (Argyll 3D) 61.56% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll 3D)
Gamma: 2.28

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM not detected

In comparison: 51 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 9429 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 142900) Hz was measured.

HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Sharp SHP1465, IPS, 3200x1800, 13.3
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Sharp LQ133M1, IPS, 1920x1080, 13.3
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
AUO226D, IPS, 1920x1080, 12.5
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-138
TOS508F, IPS, 1920x1080, 13.3
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
VVX14T058J00, IPS, 2560x1440, 14
Response Times
-25%
16%
-4%
1%
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
42.4 (17.2, 25.2)
50.4 (20.4, 30)
-19%
32 (14.8, 17.2)
25%
42 (18, 24)
1%
44 (17, 27)
-4%
Response Time Black / White *
25.6 (11.6, 14)
33.6 (13.2, 20.4)
-31%
24 (12.4, 11.6)
6%
28 (7, 21)
-9%
24 (5.2, 18.8)
6%
PWM Frequency
217 (40)
220 (90)
Screen
-20%
-19%
-19%
-2%
Brightness middle
401
261
-35%
289
-28%
300
-25%
272
-32%
Brightness
369
241
-35%
298
-19%
280
-24%
268
-27%
Brightness Distribution
85
85
0%
87
2%
87
2%
95
12%
Black Level *
0.35
0.26
26%
0.27
23%
0.31
11%
0.32
9%
Contrast
1146
1004
-12%
1070
-7%
968
-16%
850
-26%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
3.5
4.3
-23%
4.82
-38%
4.9
-40%
2.61
25%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 max. *
6.33
8.66
-37%
10.73
-70%
8.91
-41%
6.43
-2%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
4.13
5.82
-41%
3.84
7%
6.69
-62%
3.31
20%
Gamma
2.28 96%
2.44 90%
2.41 91%
2.33 94%
2.35 94%
CCT
6508 100%
6771 96%
6492 100%
6487 100%
6360 102%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
61.56
49.18
-20%
42.03
-32%
63
2%
63
2%
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
94.64
77.84
-18%
64.8
-32%
98
4%
95
0%
Total Average (Program / Settings)
-23% / -20%
-2% / -14%
-12% / -16%
-1% / -1%

* ... smaller is better

AdobeRGB coverage (61.6%)
AdobeRGB coverage (61.6%)
sRGB coverage (94.6%)
sRGB coverage (94.6%)

If the comparatively small display size is no problem, you can actually use the EliteBook for graphics and picture editing. The color-space coverage is almost 95% sRGB. Thanks to a DeltaE deviation of 3.5 (CalMAN ColorChecker), the subnotebook already performs great ex-works, and the deviation even drops to almost 1.3 after our calibration. The display is, however, not suited for editing in the AdobeRGB standard (61.6% coverage), but this is the case for all the rivals.

Grayscale
Grayscale
ColorChecker
ColorChecker
Saturation Sweeps
Saturation Sweeps
Grayscale (calibrated)
Grayscale (calibrated)
ColorChecker (calibrated)
ColorChecker (calibrated)
Saturation Sweeps (calibrated)
Saturation Sweeps (calibrated)

The 1030 G1 suffers from the very glossy screen surface outdoors, but the high maximum luminance can compensate for this issue pretty well. All in all, you can definitely use it outdoors, and you should – as usual – only avoid direct sunlight.

Outdoor use

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
25.6 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 11.6 ms rise
↘ 14 ms fall
The screen shows relatively slow response rates in our tests and may be too slow for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 45 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is similar to the average of all tested devices (25.1 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
42.4 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 17.2 ms rise
↘ 25.2 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 58 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is similar to the average of all tested devices (40.1 ms).
Viewing angles HP EliteBook 1030 G1
Viewing angles HP EliteBook 1030 G1

You also get a mostly undistorted and easily visible picture when you shift from the central seating position. The viewing angles are particularly wide with horizontal changes, while angles from above or below result in a slightly bigger contrast drop and paler colors. The performance of the EliteBook is average compared to other IPS screens.

Performance

Turbo Boost up to 3.1 GHz
Turbo Boost up to 3.1 GHz

HP decided to use the current top model of the frugal Core m lineup, the Core m7-6Y75. It is a Skylake chip with two cores including Hyper-Threading and the clocks can reach 1.2-3.1 GHz (2 cores up to 2.9 GHz) depending on the load. The default TDP for the whole 14-nm chip is 4.5 Watts, but this value can be adjusted by the notebook manufacturer.

As expected, the EliteBook is not equipped with a dedicated GPU and the graphics are exclusively handled by the integrated HD Graphics 515. With its 24 execution units (EUs), the technical specs are similar to the HD Graphics 520 of the more powerful 15-Watt models, but the Turbo Boost range (300-1000 MHz) and therefore the performance are more limited by the low TDP.

The Core m lineup currently does not support DDDR4-RAM and relies on the hardly slower and particularly efficient LPDDR3-RAM (effective clock 1866 MHz) instead. 16 GB in a dual-channel configuration is directly soldered onto the motherboard. The storage device is a compact M.2-SSD with a capacity of 512 GB.

Processor

10.5 Watt cTDP
10.5 Watt cTDP

Similar to other manufacturers, HP did increase the TDP limit of the Core m chip to improve the performance. While Dell, for example, only raises it to 5.5 Watts for the Latitude 13 7370, the processor in the EliteBook can consume up to 10.5 Watts – all the time. The limit is even increased to 15 Watts for the first 30 seconds.

The result of this adjustment is impressive: The Cinebench R15 Single-Core test is executed with the maximum clock (3.1 GHz), and the Multi-test with at least 2.7 GHz after the initial 2.9 GHz. The core frequency will only drop below the 2 GHz mark during the fourth run and starts to stabilize (depending on the ambient temperature) roughly on this level. This is the case for mains and battery operation.

Depending on the duration of the benchmark, the Core m7-6Y75 can even beat some of the Core i5 siblings. Sure: This kind of performance cannot be sustained for longer periods, but this is usually not required for a portable subnotebook. The responsiveness and the handling of short peak load are much more important – and HP's concept really works in this case.

Cinebench (start)
Cinebench (start)
Cinebench (end)
Cinebench (end)
Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-125
Intel Core i7-6500U
130 Points ∼100% +14%
HP EliteBook 820 G3 T8X20EA
Intel Core i5-6200U
117 Points ∼90% +3%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel Core m7-6Y75
114 Points ∼88%
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
Intel Core m5-6Y54
111 Points ∼85% -3%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel Core m5-6Y57
101 Points ∼78% -11%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
91 Points ∼70% -20%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
90 Points ∼69% -21%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel Core m3-6Y30
88 Points ∼68% -23%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-125
Intel Core i7-6500U
325 Points ∼100% +15%
HP EliteBook 820 G3 T8X20EA
Intel Core i5-6200U
292 Points ∼90% +3%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel Core m7-6Y75
283 Points ∼87%
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
Intel Core m5-6Y54
250 Points ∼77% -12%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
218 Points ∼67% -23%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel Core m3-6Y30
206 Points ∼63% -27%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel Core m5-6Y57
180 Points ∼55% -36%
Cinebench R11.5
CPU Single 64Bit
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel Core m7-6Y75
1.37 Points ∼100%
HP EliteBook 820 G3 T8X20EA
Intel Core i5-6200U
1.34 Points ∼98% -2%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel Core m5-6Y57
1.16 Points ∼85% -15%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
1 Points ∼73% -27%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
0.95 Points ∼69% -31%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel Core m3-6Y30
0.98 Points ∼72% -28%
CPU Multi 64Bit
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel Core m7-6Y75
3.25 Points ∼100%
HP EliteBook 820 G3 T8X20EA
Intel Core i5-6200U
3.23 Points ∼99% -1%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
2.35 Points ∼72% -28%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
2.29 Points ∼70% -30%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel Core m3-6Y30
2.27 Points ∼70% -30%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel Core m5-6Y57
2.03 Points ∼62% -38%
X264 HD Benchmark 4.0
Pass 2
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-125
Intel Core i7-6500U
21 fps ∼100% +10%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel Core m7-6Y75
19.13 fps ∼91%
HP EliteBook 820 G3 T8X20EA
Intel Core i5-6200U
19 fps ∼90% -1%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel Core m3-6Y30
14.15 fps ∼67% -26%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
13 (min: 11.7, max: 14.2) fps ∼62% -32%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel Core m5-6Y57
11.72 fps ∼56% -39%
Pass 1
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel Core m7-6Y75
108.72 fps ∼100%
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-125
Intel Core i7-6500U
104 fps ∼96% -4%
HP EliteBook 820 G3 T8X20EA
Intel Core i5-6200U
100 fps ∼92% -8%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel Core m5-6Y57
92.55 fps ∼85% -15%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel Core m3-6Y30
76.82 fps ∼71% -29%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel Core m3-6Y30
69 (min: 61.3, max: 76.8) fps ∼63% -37%
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
1.37 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
3.25 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
28.99 fps
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
283 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
114 Points
Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit
33.92 fps
Cinebench R15 Ref. Match 64Bit
97.9 %
Help

Storage Devices

AS SSD Benchmark
AS SSD Benchmark

Fast M.2-SSDs with PCIe interfaces are almost standard in the high-end segment – so it is more surprising that even the most expensive SKU of the EliteBook 1030 G1 is only equipped with a common SATA model. The SanDisk X300 does offer a lot of storage space (512 GB) but does not set any performance records with sequential transfer rates of around 470 (read) and 300 MB/s (write), respectively. Comparable PCIe-SSDs in the Latitude 13 or MacBook 12 easily surpass the 1 GB/s mark and can therefore copy large amounts of files much quicker. You can at least doubt if this is really important in practice; users of the EliteBook will hardly notice any differences when they launch applications thanks to the good 4K results of the X300.

HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-512G-1006
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPU7
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
Samsung SM951 MZVPV256 m.2
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Apple SSD AP0256
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-138
Toshiba HG6 THNSNJ512G8NY
CrystalDiskMark 3.0
154%
173%
53%
11%
Write 4k QD32
192.8
328.4
70%
292.1
52%
315
63%
174.7
-9%
Read 4k QD32
311.3
400.5
29%
464
49%
464
49%
227.3
-27%
Write 4k
75.91
105.8
39%
100.7
33%
20.5
-73%
86.27
14%
Read 4k
30.34
42.13
39%
46.96
55%
14.6
-52%
21.17
-30%
Write 512
335.3
1020
204%
1220
264%
678
102%
379.9
13%
Read 512
239.9
1140
375%
1191
396%
616
157%
414.8
73%
Write Seq
348.7
1132
225%
1232
253%
638
83%
423.3
21%
Read Seq
387.5
1354
249%
1482
282%
754
95%
518.2
34%

System Performance

The 1030 G1 does not manage to secure a top spot in the PCMark ranking without PCIe-SSD, but the difference to similar competitors is not really that big. Quite the contrary: Subjectively, the EliteBook is just as fast as some bigger and actively cooled office notebooks with Core i5 CPUs in practice. We already mentioned that this is mainly a result of the adjusted TDP configuration and the perfect Turbo Boost utilization. HP's 1030 G1 definitely proves that you can build a full-fledged working device based on a Core m chip.

PCMark 8
Work Score Accelerated v2
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN256HCHP
4342 Points ∼100% +15%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
HD Graphics 515, 6Y57, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPU7
4238 Points ∼98% +12%
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
HD Graphics 515, 6Y54, Samsung SM951 MZVPV256 m.2
4146 Points ∼95% +10%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-512G-1006
3784 Points ∼87%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
HD Graphics 515, 6Y30, Apple SSD AP0256
3550 Points ∼82% -6%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
HD Graphics 515, 6Y30, Samsung MZFLV128 NVMe
3186 Points ∼73% -16%
Creative Score Accelerated v2
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN256HCHP
4150 Points ∼100% +17%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-512G-1006
3555 Points ∼86%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
HD Graphics 515, 6Y57, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPU7
3528 Points ∼85% -1%
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
HD Graphics 515, 6Y54, Samsung SM951 MZVPV256 m.2
3430 Points ∼83% -4%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
HD Graphics 515, 6Y30, Samsung MZFLV128 NVMe
2968 Points ∼72% -17%
Home Score Accelerated v2
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN256HCHP
3385 Points ∼100% +19%
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-138
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Toshiba HG6 THNSNJ512G8NY
3271 Points ∼97% +15%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
HD Graphics 515, 6Y57, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPU7
3048 Points ∼90% +7%
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
HD Graphics 515, 6Y54, Samsung SM951 MZVPV256 m.2
3037 Points ∼90% +7%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-512G-1006
2838 Points ∼84%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
HD Graphics 515, 6Y30, Apple SSD AP0256
2550 Points ∼75% -10%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
HD Graphics 515, 6Y30, Samsung MZFLV128 NVMe
2426 Points ∼72% -15%
PCMark 7 - Score
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN256HCHP
5350 Points ∼100% +9%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-512G-1006
4917 Points ∼92%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
HD Graphics 515, 6Y30, Samsung MZFLV128 NVMe
4274 Points ∼80% -13%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
HD Graphics 515, 6Y57, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPU7
4165 Points ∼78% -15%
PCMark 7 Score
4917 points
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
2838 points
PCMark 8 Creative Score Accelerated v2
3555 points
PCMark 8 Work Score Accelerated v2
3784 points
Help
Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-512G-1006
Transfer Rate Minimum: 86.1 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 403.6 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 373.8 MB/s
Access Time: 0.1 ms
Burst Rate: 49.6 MB/s
CPU Usage: 3.5 %

GPU Performance

Accelerated HEVC playback
Accelerated HEVC playback

Just like the CPU, the GPU of the EliteBook also comes pretty close to its Skylake sibling (particularly the HD Graphics 520 from the 15-Watt lineup) – at least when you look at the 3DMark scores. We have to be a bit careful here though, since real 3D applications usually create sustained load and therefore do not really benefit from a fast Turbo that is supposed to cover peak load. If you play for more than a couple of minutes or edit CAD models, you will have to expect a noticeable performance drop of the HD Graphics 515 due to the lack of a fan.

The system does leave an excellent impression in terms of video playback. It does not matter if you watch H.264 or H.265/HEVC, Full HD or 4K: Almost all the important standards are decoded by Skylake at minimum CPU load and the corresponding movies run smoothly. Only VP9 as well as HEVC Main 10 require additional support from the CPU and GPU.

3DMark 11 - 1280x720 Performance GPU
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i7-6500U
1386 Points ∼100% +22%
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-138
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i7-6500U
1377 Points ∼99% +22%
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m5-6Y54
1254 Points ∼90% +11%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m3-6Y30
1206 Points ∼87% +7%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m3-6Y30
1186 Points ∼86% +5%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m7-6Y75
1132 Points ∼82%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m5-6Y57
992 Points ∼72% -12%
3DMark
1920x1080 Fire Strike Graphics
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i7-6500U
959 Points ∼100% +8%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m7-6Y75
892 Points ∼93%
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m5-6Y54
844 Points ∼88% -5%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m3-6Y30
810 Points ∼84% -9%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m3-6Y30
735 Points ∼77% -18%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m5-6Y57
565 Points ∼59% -37%
1280x720 Cloud Gate Standard Graphics
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i7-6500U
7516 Points ∼100% +12%
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m5-6Y54
7035 Points ∼94% +5%
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m7-6Y75
6684 Points ∼89%
Microsoft Surface Pro 4, Core m3
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m3-6Y30
6597 Points ∼88% -1%
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m3-6Y30
6078 Points ∼81% -9%
Dell Latitude 13 7370
Intel HD Graphics 515, Intel Core m5-6Y57
4658 Points ∼62% -30%
3DMark 06 Standard
7197 points
3DMark 11 Performance
1219 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score
43571 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score
5242 points
3DMark Fire Strike Score
774 points
Help

Gaming Performance

At reduced resolutions and minimum details, the EliteBook can actually handle some modern titles like Dirt Rally with decent frame rates, even though they can drop a bit when you play for longer periods. The HD Graphics 515 is not powerful enough for higher settings, let alone the native display resolution – even older casual games like Diablo 3 will require reduced settings.

low med. high ultra
BioShock Infinite (2013) 44.619.516.75.1fps
Metro: Last Light (2013) 21.51812.5fps
Dirt Rally (2015) 67.215.812.5fps

Emissions

System Noise

Thanks to the passive cooling and the silent SSD drive, the 1030 G1 neither makes any noise while idling nor under maximum load. You will be able to hear a quiet electrical humming from time to time when you put your ear directly to the notebook, but it is not audible from a normal working distance.

Temperature

Stress test
Stress test
Prime95
Prime95

Even though the EliteBook can consume quite a lot of power for short periods, the user does not have to expect burned fingers. The clocks are reduced stepwise based on increasing chassis and hardware temperatures, so the chassis does not get much warmer than lukewarm even under sustained loads. Only some spots at the right side will just surpass 40 °C, but this is also the case for some actively cooled competitors.

The Core m7 starts our stress test with almost its full Turbo Boost and a CPU consumption of 15 Watts before the mentioned throttling sets in. After around one hour, the 6Y75 levels off at 700 MHz (CPU) and 450 MHz (GPU), respectively, which corresponds with a power consumption of 5 Watts. If you only stress the processor with Prime95, you will at least get a CPU clock of 1.7 GHz. There is actually more potential here when you consider core temperatures of around 65 °C, but the chassis would also get much warmer as a result.

Max. Load
 34.7 °C
94 F
37.6 °C
100 F
43.4 °C
110 F
 
 34.5 °C
94 F
35.7 °C
96 F
41.9 °C
107 F
 
 33.4 °C
92 F
33.1 °C
92 F
38.7 °C
102 F
 
Maximum: 43.4 °C = 110 F
Average: 37 °C = 99 F
44.5 °C
112 F
42.9 °C
109 F
35.4 °C
96 F
41.9 °C
107 F
38.8 °C
102 F
33.6 °C
92 F
37.5 °C
100 F
34.3 °C
94 F
32.7 °C
91 F
Maximum: 44.5 °C = 112 F
Average: 38 °C = 100 F
Power Supply (max.)  45.5 °C = 114 F | Room Temperature 24.1 °C = 75 F | Fluke 62 Max
(±) The average temperature for the upper side under maximal load is 37 °C / 99 F, compared to the average of 30.7 °C / 87 F for the devices in the class Subnotebook.
(±) The maximum temperature on the upper side is 43.4 °C / 110 F, compared to the average of 35.8 °C / 96 F, ranging from 22 to 57 °C for the class Subnotebook.
(±) The bottom heats up to a maximum of 44.5 °C / 112 F, compared to the average of 40.1 °C / 104 F
(+) In idle usage, the average temperature for the upper side is 30.6 °C / 87 F, compared to the device average of 30.7 °C / 87 F.
(±) The palmrests and touchpad can get very hot to the touch with a maximum of 38.7 °C / 101.7 F.
(-) The average temperature of the palmrest area of similar devices was 28.6 °C / 83.5 F (-10.1 °C / -18.2 F).

Speakers

Compared to other subnotebooks, the stereo speakers, which were designed in cooperation with Bang & Olufsen, surprise us with a balanced and rich sound. You can notice some bass, even though the EliteBook cannot quite keep up with the Apple MacBook 12 in this respect. The maximum volume is very good at 83 dB(A) in return, so you can also use the test model adequately in bigger rooms.

dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2038.436.935.938.42535.936.83335.93136.236.835.936.2403838.835.4385035.535.935.135.56335.335.634.835.3803637.136.3361003737.738.8371253939.538.63916037.933.131.737.920049.940.331.149.925057.346.531.357.331563.253.430.563.240067.857.229.467.850071.961.528.371.963076.366.427.876.38007666.227.476100075.164.826.675.1125071.460.826.571.4160076.866.826.376.820007463.525.874250073.86325.773.831507564.625.475400071.160.425.371.1500070.159.525.470.1630067.25925.367.2800071.160.924.971.11000068.458.925.168.41250065.655.625.865.61600060.649.624.660.6median 70.1median 59.5median 26.5median 70.1Delta7.772.67.735.335.132.931.831.83236.535.132.428.93328.936.328.848.32761.52752.924.860.92462.822.763.32269.521.267.82174.82075.919.472.718.97117.770.117.86917.671.817.668.117.671.417.673.717.670.417.571.617.671.617.669.617.459.717.583.630.662.51.5median 69.6median 17.84.62.4hearing rangehide median Pink NoiseHP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EAApple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz

Frequency Comparison (Checkboxes select/deselectable!)
Graph 1: Pink Noise 100% Vol.; Graph 2: Audio off

Energy Management

Power Consumption

With an idle consumption of 4.0-8.6 Watts, the EliteBook 1030 G1 needs slightly more power than the majority of rivals, which is mainly a result of the bright high-resolution display. The good Turbo utilization will increase the consumption up to 34.8 Watts under load, but it will settle at a more moderate 20 Watts. The provided 45-Watt power adapter is sufficient in all scenarios.

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0.23 / 0.32 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 4 / 8 / 8.6 Watt
Load midlight 26.5 / 34.8 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
6Y75, HD Graphics 515, Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-512G-1006, IPS, 3200x1800, 13.3
Dell Latitude 13 7370
6Y57, HD Graphics 515, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPU7, IPS, 1920x1080, 13.3
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
6Y54, HD Graphics 515, Samsung SM951 MZVPV256 m.2, IPS, 1920x1080, 12.5
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-138
6500U, HD Graphics 520, Toshiba HG6 THNSNJ512G8NY, IPS, 1920x1080, 13.3
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
6500U, HD Graphics 520, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN256HCHP, IPS, 2560x1440, 14
Power Consumption
11%
13%
-8%
-3%
Idle Minimum *
4
5
-25%
4.3
-8%
3.2
20%
3.8
5%
Idle Average *
8
7.5
6%
6
25%
7.8
2%
7.1
11%
Idle Maximum *
8.6
8
7%
6.4
26%
8.7
-1%
7.7
10%
Load Average *
26.5
15.3
42%
22.7
14%
42.2
-59%
30.2
-14%
Load Maximum *
34.8
26.8
23%
31.2
10%
35.7
-3%
44.7
-28%

* ... smaller is better

Battery Runtime

Considering the height and the weight of the 1030 G1, HP only included a meager 40-Wh battery, which only enables average runtimes at best. The 13-inch device will only last for more than 10 hours while idling and at the lowest luminance, but users should expect between 5-6 hours in practice (WLAN browsing and HD videos at 150 nits). It is unfortunately not possible to replace the battery with a bigger and more powerful unit due to the integration into the chassis. If you need longer runtimes, you should get the potentially more frugal Full HD display.

Reader's Test
Reader's Test
WLAN test
WLAN test
H.264 test
H.264 test
Classic Test
Classic Test
Charging
Charging
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
10h 18min
NBC WiFi Websurfing Battery Test 1.3
5h 05min
Big Buck Bunny H.264 1080p
6h 17min
Load (maximum brightness)
2h 24min
HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA
6Y75, HD Graphics 515, 40 Wh
Dell Latitude 13 7370
6Y57, HD Graphics 515, 34 Wh
HP EliteBook Folio G1 V1C37EA
6Y54, HD Graphics 515, 38 Wh
Toshiba Portege Z30-C-138
6500U, HD Graphics 520, 52 Wh
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 20FB003RGE
6500U, HD Graphics 520, 52 Wh
Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz
6Y30, HD Graphics 515, 41.4 Wh
Battery Runtime
10%
4%
13%
27%
53%
Reader / Idle
618
588
-5%
526
-15%
942
52%
H.264
377
391
4%
413
10%
510
35%
512
36%
WiFi v1.3
305
367
20%
355
16%
345
13%
429
41%
501
64%
Load
144
176
22%
152
6%
115
-20%
231
60%

Pros

+ high-quality case
+ excellent input devices
+ great QHD+ display
+ high application performance
+ fast WLAN
+ USB Type-C
+ fanless

Cons

- limited upgradeability
- average battery runtimes
- DisplayPort only via dock

Verdict

In review: HP EliteBook 1030 G1. Test model courtesy of HP Germany.
In review: HP EliteBook 1030 G1. Test model courtesy of HP Germany.

There can be different opinions about the basic concept of a passively cooled business notebook: If you have to run demanding calculations even at summery temperatures and need as much performance as possible, you will definitely be better off with a classic Core i processor. For simple office applications, browsing or video conferences, however, you usually do not need as much performance – other aspects like the input devices, weight and the noise development are more important.

HP took this approach and created an almost perfect device with the EliteBook 1030 G1. The notebook is among the best devices in terms of quality and can particularly convince with its build quality, the keyboard, and the display. The application performance is also pretty good, despite the mentioned limitations, since HP managed a good compromise between performance and heat development thanks to clever TDP and temperature limits. Only the comparatively short battery runtime does not really meet our idea of a perfect Ultrabook – the upcoming Full HD model will probably have more stamina if you can waive the extremely sharp QHD+ panel.

All in all, the 1030 G1 really deserves a recommendation, even though the high retail prices between 1,500 and 2,000 Euros (~$1697 and ~$2263) might scare off some potential buyers at first. Similar competitors, however, are not cheaper.

HP EliteBook 1030 G1-X2F03EA - 07/11/2016 v5.1
Till Schönborn

Chassis
91 /  98 → 93%
Keyboard
92%
Pointing Device
90%
Connectivity
52 / 80 → 65%
Weight
73 / 35-78 → 88%
Battery
85%
Display
86%
Games Performance
54 / 68 → 80%
Application Performance
80 / 87 → 92%
Temperature
89 / 91 → 98%
Noise
100%
Audio
75 / 91 → 82%
Camera
47 / 85 → 56%
Average
78%
88%
Subnotebook - Weighted Average

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > HP EliteBook 1030 G1 Subnotebook Review
Till Schönborn, 2016-08-21 (Update: 2018-05-15)
Andreas Osthoff
Andreas Osthoff - Senior Editor Business
I grew up with computers and modern consumer electronics. I am interested in the technology since I had my first computer, a Commodore C64, and started building my own PCs after that. My focus here at Notebookcheck is the business segment including mobile workstations, but I also like to test new mobile devices. It is always a great experience to review and compare new products. My free time is filled with a lot of sports, in the summer mainly on my bike.