Notebookcheck

Google may be considering Live Support for new Nexus devices

Google may be considering Live Support for new Nexus devices (Source: Android Police)
Google may be considering Live Support for new Nexus devices (Source: Android Police)
The app would allow users to easily contact and speak with service representatives for troubleshooting in a manner similar to Amazon Mayday.

Live support isn't exactly a new feature for troubleshooting devices. The Amazon Kindle Fire series, for example, lets users speak directly with customer service individuals on the tablet at almost any time for software help at no addition cost. Screen sharing can even allow the person on the other end to gain control of the tablet to guide the user as needed.

According to the latest rumors from Androidpolice.com, Google may be looking into a similar "Mayday" support application for its next generation of Nexus devices. The source is interesting in that not only does it shows a screenshot of the supposed live support screen, but it also shows the reworked navigation bar that Google may be implementing for Android N. Nonetheless, Androidpolice admits that this could simply be a mock up.

If true, Android N users may be able to speak with service representatives with a simple touch of a button. One big question still remains, however, as it is unknown if Google would be willing to offer the same live support services to other Android smartphones from major manufacturers.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > Google may be considering Live Support for new Nexus devices
Florian Wimmer/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06-30 (Update: 2016-06-30)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.