Notebookcheck

Google sets end-of-life dates for its current selection of Nexus devices

Google sets end-of-life dates for its current selection of Nexus devices
Google sets end-of-life dates for its current selection of Nexus devices
Google is committing to a two-year long support cycle for its newer Nexus smartphones and tablets while smaller patches for security flaws will continue for about a year longer.

The Google Nexus page now lists the final dates for when the company plans to stop developing new updates for existing Nexus devices. In general, Google will continue to support current Nexus smartphones and tablets for around two years after initial shipments. Updates relating to bugs and security fixes, however, will continue for up to three years after initial shipments or about 18 months after sales have stopped.

This means, for example, that there are no guarantees for any new major software updates on the Nexus 5X and 6P after September 2017. Of course, Google reserves the right to continue releasing updates indefinitely for these devices however unlikely that may be. Older models like the Nexus 9 and Nexus 6 will see their major planned updates come to an end this coming October 2016.

Fortunately, community support for Nexus devices is very strong especially when compared to smartphones from lesser-known manufacturers. Custom ROMs like CyanogenMod are constantly updated to breathe new life onto older hardware that may no longer be supported. Both Huawei and HTC are rumored to be working on the latest generation of Nexus devices for possible announcements before the end of this year.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > Google sets end-of-life dates for its current selection of Nexus devices
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06-24 (Update: 2016-06-25)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.