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Possible Google Nexus 2016 design leaked

Possible Google Nexus 2016 design leaked
Possible Google Nexus 2016 design leaked
At least two size options should be coming differing only in internal specifications and dimensions. Unlike the Nexus 5X or 6P, the housing may be made mostly of aluminum.

Specifications for the next Nexus "Sailfish" and "Marlin" smartphones were leaked just a few days ago, but Android Police now claims to have the final design shot of the upcoming series. Accordingly, both devices will have the same design and differ only in specifications and dimensions, so the leaked shot should be representative of both models.

The Nexus 2016 will have some interesting features if the leaked image proves to be true. The chassis may be largely aluminum while the upper third will consist of a more reflective material that can be either glass or plastic. A rear fingerprint sensor can be spotted and the rear camera will no longer protrude like on the current Nexus 6P. The "Nexus" logo appears to be missing as well and may be replaced by a simple "G" for Google.

Color options should include Gray, Silver, and Blue with a white front. Both Huawei and HTC have been rumored to be working on multiple versions to succeed both the Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > Possible Google Nexus 2016 design leaked
Benjamin Herzig/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07-10 (Update: 2016-07-10)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.