Notebookcheck

Chinese company allegedly developing a GTX 1080-class GPU with faster clocks, PCIe 4.0, and high bandwidth HBM memory

The Jingjia Micro JM5400 GPU was tailored for military aircraft displays. (Source: CNews.cz)
The Jingjia Micro JM5400 GPU was tailored for military aircraft displays. (Source: CNews.cz)
Chinese GPU maker Jingia Micro is developing a new GPU that comes close to rivaling the NVIDIA GTX 1080, at least on paper. The JM9271 offers fast clocks, PCIe 4.0, HBM memory, and a 200W TDP. Jingjia's focus seems to be on the specialized military applications market at the moment, but support for DirectX 12 and Vulkan APIs could make it potentially suitable for gaming.

Chinese GPU maker Changsha Jingjia Microelectronics is reportedly developing an in-house graphics card that is touted to offer performance equivalent to that of an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080. The JM9271 is an OpenGL 4.5-compatible card that offers some impressive specs on paper. 

First reported by CNBeta, information regarding Jingjia Micro's GPU development pipeline was presented in the company's H1 2019 financial results. Currently, Jingjia Micro has received orders for production of the 28nm JM7200 GPU. The JM7200 has a low power consumption of just 10W but offers performance comparable to an NVIDIA GT 640 (50W). The predecessor, the 65nm JM5400, was considered robust enough for use in military aircraft displays. 

Buoyed by the success of the previous iterations, Jingjia Micro is developing a successor to the JM7 series. Called the JM9 series, the company says that the new GPUs are in an engineering development stage having completed the feasibility and program demonstrations. Front-end design and software design are reportedly underway. There are two GPUs in the pipeline — JM9231 and JM9271. 

JM9231 has clock rates above 1,500 MHz, 8 GB GDDR5, 256 GB/s memory bandwidth, 2 TFLOPs of FP32 performance, and a TDP of 150W. On paper, the JM9231 can provide a tough competition to the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050. Up the ladder, we have the flagship JM9271 that looks to be a very powerful card. 

The JM9271 offers clock rates above 1,800 MHz, support PCIe 4.0, sports 16 GB HBM VRAM with 512 GB/s bandwidth, 8 TFLOPs of FP32 performance, and a TDP of 200W. With these specs, the card is expected to offer performance equivalent to a GTX 1080. 

Apart from the specs, nothing much is known about the cards themselves so we'd advise against getting any hopes up. The cards only support OpenGL and do not list support for DirectX 12 or Vulkan APIs so it could be that their application restricted to special niches. We do not know if support for these APIs would be added sometime later, but that seems somewhat unlikely given that early engineering samples have already been reportedly demoed.

Of course, it will take a lot of work before Jingjia Micro can compete against NVIDIA and AMD (or even Intel), but there seems to be good potential for home-grown tech in the Chinese market. Recently, we saw another Chinese company, Zhaoxin Semiconductor, introduce the Windows-compatible octa-core KX-6000 CPU whose performance can potentially rival an Intel Core i5-7400. Right pricing might eventually see Chinese companies steal a significant market share from established semiconductor players. 

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Especially English native speakers welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

JM9231 and JM9271 specs in comparison with the GTX 1050 and GTX 1080 respectively. (Source: CNBeta)
JM9231 and JM9271 specs in comparison with the GTX 1050 and GTX 1080 respectively. (Source: CNBeta)

Source(s)

PCGamesN via CNBeta (Chinese)

Read all 5 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 08 > Chinese company allegedly developing a GTX 1080-class GPU with faster clocks, PCIe 4.0, and high bandwidth HBM memory
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2019-08-24 (Update: 2019-08-24)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.