Notebookcheck

Aorus X7 DT v6 Notebook Review

Boundless performance. Gigabyte has taken the design of their AORUS gaming notebook to the next level with the advent of the X7 DT v6. With class-leading GPU and CPU performance, speedy solid-state storage, and powerful networking and display options, can anything slow it down?

For some time now, Gigabyte has been working to make serious inroads into the gaming notebook market (often dominated by the likes of Alienware, ASUS ROG, and MSI, among a few other newcomers) with progressively-higher quality offerings. Today, we are met with what is easily their most convincing concoction to date: the X7 DT v6, equipped to kill—and at $3,099 MSRP, perhaps priced that way, also. But among its qualities, one thing the X7 DT v6 does not seem to be willing to include is compromise. From an overclocked Intel Core i7-6820HK to the formidable NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080, augmented by 32 GB of DDR4 memory and a 512 GB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD, this is one notebook that should leave no one wanting.

It’s also a considerably sleeker and more beautiful machine than we’ve seen from Gigabyte in the past, and its relative portability for its class (3.25 kg) provokes the typical concerns regarding thermal management and operating noise. The most obvious direct comparison here would be to the new Razer Blade Pro, which sports nearly identical specs and with a comparable form factor and portability—though we have yet to review the Razer. As usual, our bevy of unparalleled tests will reveal the cracks (if any) in this impressive foundation. Let’s get started.

Aorus X7 DT v6 (X7 Series)
Graphics adapter
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop) - 8192 MB MB, Core: 1566 - 1733 MHz, Memory: 10000 MHz MHz, 21.21.13.6926 - ForceWare 369.26, no
Memory
32768 MB 
, DDR4-2400
Display
17.3 inch 16:9, 2560 x 1440 pixel 170 PPI, AUO1096, TN LED, glossy: no
Mainboard
Intel Sunrise Point HM170
Storage
Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e, 512 GB 
Soundcard
Realtek ALC255 @ Intel Sunrise Point PCH - High Definition Audio Controller
Connections
3 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 1 USB 3.1 Gen2, 2 HDMI, 1 DisplayPort, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: Headphones (S/PDIF), Microphone, Card Reader: SD, SDHC, SDXC
Networking
Killer e2200 (10/100/1000MBit), Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter (b/g/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.1
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 25 x 426 x 308 ( = 0.98 x 16.77 x 12.13 in)
Battery
94 Wh Lithium-Polymer
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 10 Home 64 Bit
Camera
Webcam: HD
Additional features
Speakers: 2.0 + 2 subwoofers, Keyboard: Chiclet, Keyboard Light: yes, 12 Months Warranty
Weight
3.25 kg ( = 114.64 oz / 7.17 pounds), Power Supply: 900 g ( = 31.75 oz / 1.98 pounds)

 

Case

The AORUS X7 DT v6 features a sleek, magnesium case with predominantly flat surfaces. The biggest exception to this is on the display lid, where the chiseled lines subtly flank the silvery eagle logo in the center of the lid—just enough flair, but nothing too flashy. Meanwhile, the rest of the device is comparably understated, with only the lighted power button and multicolored individually-lit keys truly standing out. One can just make out the markings of the AORUS logo on the touchpad’s surface in dim light; in brighter conditions, it becomes more obvious. The only complaint we can lodge here is regarding that of fingerprints and skin oils, which are drawn to the surfaces easily and are much more difficult to clean. A microfiber cloth is included to help facilitate such aesthetic maintenance.

Haptically, the surfaces also feel luxurious. The metal is cool to the touch (while idling, anyway) and provides a softer feel than glossier options. Owing partially to its large rubber feet, the unit is noticeably stable on a flat surface. Not much flex is present apart from in the very center of the base unit, and only under moderate pressure. Meanwhile, the display lid is fairly rigid, but pressure on the back does produce visible distortions on the panel—so care should be taken to avoid it.

The relatively light weight of 3.25 kg (7.17 pounds) is complimented by just 30 mm in thickness and an overall quite portable package. Tight hinges also help make usage during transit pleasant. In conjunction with the weight of the base unit, the hinges are tuned just tightly enough to provide for comfortable single-handed opening without lifting the base off the surface.

Connectivity

Most everything we like to see is present in terms of connectivity on the X7 DT v6; we’re treated to four total USB ports (three USB 3.0 and one USB 3.1 Type-C, without Thunderbolt 3 support) and plenty of options for video output (2x HDMI along with DisplayPort). Don’t be fooled by the VGA-shaped rubber cover on the left side of the unit; it isn’t actually a VGA port, and instead is merely an empty space (see our photos of the internal motherboard for evidence of this). Port layout is mostly convenient, with the USB ports spread out to three different edges and the two HDMI ports also opposite one another; spacing is perhaps a little tight but should not prove problematic for most cables and adapters.

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Front: No ports
Front: No ports
Rear: Charging port, USB 3.0
Rear: Charging port, USB 3.0
Left: Kensington Lock, Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI, USB 3.0, headphones, microphone
Left: Kensington Lock, Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI, USB 3.0, headphones, microphone
Right: SD card reader (full), USB 3.0, USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 1, HDMI, mini DisplayPort
Right: SD card reader (full), USB 3.0, USB 3.1 Type-C Gen 1, HDMI, mini DisplayPort
SDCardreader Transfer Speed
average JPG Copy Test (av. of 3 runs)
MSI GT73VR 6RF
 
155.1 MB/s ∼100% +86%
Aorus X7 DT v6
 
83.25 MB/s ∼54%
Aorus X7 v6
 
78 MB/s ∼50% -6%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
 
76 MB/s ∼49% -9%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
 
74 MB/s ∼48% -11%
maximum AS SSD Seq Read Test (1GB)
MSI GT73VR 6RF
 
209.4 MB/s ∼100% +131%
Aorus X7 DT v6
 
90.59 MB/s ∼43%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
 
87 MB/s ∼42% -4%
Aorus X7 v6
 
87 MB/s ∼42% -4%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
 
84 MB/s ∼40% -7%

Communication

The internal Killer WLAN adapter
The internal Killer WLAN adapter

The Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter included in the X7 DT v6 features a maximum throughput of 867 Mbps with 20/40 MHz channel bandwidth at 2.4 GHz and 20/40/80 MHz at 5 GHz. The adapter performed well in our testing, and we also appreciated the included DoubleShot Pro technology, which automatically leverages both the Killer Ethernet adapter and the Wi-Fi adapter together for 1.867 Mbps total bandwidth, and which also prioritizes traffic between the two based on which connection is quicker at any particular moment. This functionality seemed to work well during our testing of the machine. The Killer Wi-Fi adapter also includes Bluetooth 4.1 functionality.

Accessories

The X7 DT v6 includes a fairly hefty 230W Delta Electronics ADP-230EB T AC adapter, which is a relatively common adapter also used for some ASUS ROG notebooks. It weighs in at 900 g, which is a typical size for a notebook of this class. Apart from the power adapter, a microfiber cleaning cloth and a USB flash drive loaded with system drivers are also in the box.

Software

Gigabyte’s included Command & Control software (with a logo and name that harkens back to an old real-time strategy game we loved) is truly a useful asset. At the most basic level, it provides easy access to audio volume, screen brightness, wireless toggles, and other such fundamentals.

But beyond this, there are also a host of other deeper functions. First on the list is the easy-to-use fan speed controls (with preset profiles), which allow the user to specify everything ranging from “quiet” machine operation (where throttling and temperature development are sacrificed in exchange for lower noise levels) to “gaming” (quite noisy, but with limited throttling) or even manual speed settings of higher than that. Next are the overclocking controls, which offer an elementary dashboard-like interface to monitor temperatures and/or power up the CPU and GPU clock rates beyond their stock defaults.

Audio controls provide fairly granular control over the shape of the resulting sound, while an integrated driver update utility and system backup tool make maintenance and disaster planning relatively painless. Various other switches and options also exist, such as those relating to USB charge functionality and video output selection. Finally, the “Fusion” module provides for extremely intricate control over the sophisticated keyboard backlighting system, in which each individual key can be illuminated with a palette spanning 16.7 million colors. Preset animations are selectable (with customizable parameters, such as speed, direction, and brightness), or individual keys can have their lights powered on or off for easy identification of the controls for a particular application.

The AORUS Command & Control main menu
The AORUS Command & Control main menu
AORUS OC Gauge
AORUS OC Gauge

Maintenance

Upgrading and replacement of parts on the AORUS X7 is not too much of a trial, provided the user has a Torx screwdriver at their disposal. 12 screws secure the bottom panel to the base unit, and it is worth noting that the two center bottom screws are also covered by a thin film which seems likely to be present to indicate whether the unit has been opened by the user. Once inside, both fans are easily accessible for cleaning, and tons of replaceable parts and ports are available: two M.2 2280 SSD ports (one of which was populated on our review configuration), a 2.5-inch 7mm drive bay (also populated), four (4) RAM slots for DDR4 SODIMMs (2 populated), the WLAN adapter, CMOS battery, and finally, the internal system battery.

Beneath 12 screws and the bottom panel...
Beneath 12 screws and the bottom panel...
...lies practically every replaceable internal component.
...lies practically every replaceable internal component.

Warranty

The X7 DT v6 includes a 2-year global warranty (1 year on the battery).

Input Devices

Keyboard

The X7 V6 features a substantially better keyboard than previous models. Keys feature a medium stroke with good feedback, tight construction, and comfortable actuation force. The layout is also acceptable, though the vertical row of macro keys on the far left side takes some adjustment; similar to the ThinkPad Fn/Ctrl syndrome, for the first few weeks of use, the user is likely to inadvertently mistake these keys for the typical keys bordering the left side of a typical keyboard. Since this is a 17.3-inch machine, a full-sized number pad is also included on the right side. As is often the case, the arrow keys spread into this real estate, which can also initially be a bit confusing (since they feature no differentiating marks).

Layout gripes aside, the keyboard is very good however. The previously-described backlight customization is also a sweet bonus, and is as useful as it is attractive.

Touchpad

The large ELAN touchpad is also a welcomed upgrade from previous models, with a new matte finish that provides for a soft-touch finish and effortless gliding across the surface. The integrated buttons worked well enough throughout our time with the unit, and although we occasionally struggled with drag-and-drop and other such operations, they’re better than many other previously-reviewed units. Gestures worked for the most part.

The keyboard is overall excellent.
The keyboard is overall excellent.
The keys feature good travel and great feedback.
The keys feature good travel and great feedback.
The touchpad isn't quite as nice, but it's more than adequate nonetheless.
The touchpad isn't quite as nice, but it's more than adequate nonetheless.

Display

Subpixel layout, Aorus X7 DT v6
Subpixel layout, Aorus X7 DT v6

The AORUS X7 DT v6 features a 17.3-inch, 1440p (2560x1440) resolution TN LED display. You might be wondering why Gigabyte didn’t opt for an IPS panel; well, the answer lies in response times, which are advertised as a mere 5 ms on the X7 v6 versus values which are typically three or four times slower on the average IPS panel. The display also offers a 120 Hz refresh rate for butter-smooth, practically ghost-free motion. Naturally, the flip side of the coin is viewing angles, which are only average on the X7.

308.7
cd/m²
319.9
cd/m²
294.9
cd/m²
320.6
cd/m²
339.5
cd/m²
296.3
cd/m²
307.6
cd/m²
322.3
cd/m²
270.5
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro 2
Maximum: 339.5 cd/m² Average: 308.9 cd/m² Minimum: 17.9 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 80 %
Center on Battery: 339.5 cd/m²
Contrast: 754:1 (Black: 0.45 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 6.88 | 0.4-29.43 Ø6.3
ΔE Greyscale 6.57 | 0.64-98 Ø6.5
82% sRGB (Argyll 3D) 54% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll 3D)
Gamma: 2.04
Aorus X7 DT v6
AUO1096, TN LED, 17.3, 2560x1440
Aorus X7 v6
B173QTN01.0 (AUO1096), TN LED, 17.3, 2560x1440
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
LG Philips LP156WF6-SPB6 (LGD046F), IPS, 15.6, 1920x1080
HP Omen 17-w110ng
LG Philips LGD046E, IPS, 17.3, 1920x1080
MSI GT73VR 6RF
IPS, 17.3, 3840x2160
Response Times
-10%
-75%
-77%
-92%
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
21.6 (12.4, 9.2)
31 (11, 20)
-44%
38 (16, 22)
-76%
37 (13, 24)
-71%
33.6 (13.2, 20.4)
-56%
Response Time Black / White *
13.2 (4.4, 8.8)
10 (3, 7)
24%
23 (5, 18)
-74%
24 (4, 20)
-82%
30 (5.2, 24.8)
-127%
PWM Frequency
59.52
Screen
-5%
13%
21%
13%
Brightness middle
339.5
343
1%
315
-7%
362
7%
334.8
-1%
Brightness
309
312
1%
290
-6%
342
11%
316
2%
Brightness Distribution
80
80
0%
85
6%
87
9%
87
9%
Black Level *
0.45
0.5
-11%
0.32
29%
0.31
31%
0.422
6%
Contrast
754
686
-9%
984
31%
1168
55%
793
5%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
6.88
7.33
-7%
4.88
29%
4.5
35%
4.11
40%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 max. *
9.99
10.79
-8%
8.88
11%
9.31
7%
7.8
22%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
6.57
7.6
-16%
4.17
37%
3.48
47%
5.74
13%
Gamma
2.04 108%
2.19 100%
2.53 87%
2.23 99%
2.3 96%
CCT
8608 76%
9024 72%
6683 97%
6144 106%
5987 109%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
54
55
2%
55
2%
55
2%
60.5
12%
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
82
84
2%
83
1%
84
2%
96
17%
Total Average (Program / Settings)
-8% / -5%
-31% / -1%
-28% / 4%
-40% / -5%

* ... smaller is better

Subjectively, colors, contrast, and brightness all appear to be good. However, the panel exhibits detectable interlacing (brightness varies between each horizontal line), which is likely to drive some users crazy. Gigabyte has admitted that the problem exists on community forums but also has explained that no workaround or corrective measures exist. Other notebooks featuring the same display panel (AUO1096) also exhibit this same problem. On the bright side, many users are not bothered by this idiosyncrasy, and the other benefits conveyed by the panel (fast response times, 120 Hz refresh rate) are hard to ignore. This limitation is not really noticeable at all while gaming or during any sort of motion—situations in which the 120 Hz panel refresh rate really shines.

We measured an average brightness of 309 cd/m² with a peak value of 339.5 cd/m² in the center, which computes to a brightness distribution of 80%. That’s not a terrific value, but it’s also still not a terribly noticeable discrepancy. Contrast is strong for a TN panel at 754:1, made possible by a low black value of 0.45 cd/m².

In terms of color coverage, the X7 DT v6 manages just 82% of the sRGB spectrum and 54% of AdobeRGB 1998. These numbers will hardly satisfy photo enthusiasts and they can’t match some of the premium panels provided by competitors such as MSI and Dell, but they’re sufficient for the target audience nonetheless.

vs. sRGB
vs. sRGB
vs. Omen 17
vs. Omen 17
vs. GT73VR
vs. GT73VR
vs. GL502
vs. GL502

Color accuracy is also nothing special. The Native Color preset in the Command & Control module is the default and presents the most balanced profile of all the options. We measured a ColorChecker DeltaE2000 value of 7.33 and a Grayscale DeltaE2000 of 7.6, both of which are fairly high (and less accurate than the competitors we chose, all of which managed values in the 4 to 5 range). The total gamma of 2.04 was slightly lower than ideal (2.2), and the CCT Average of 8608K indicates a cooler display temperature than the target value of 6500K. Again, the competitors easily beat these values.

Color analysis (pre-calibration)
Color analysis (pre-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (pre-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (pre-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (pre-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (pre-calibration)
Color analysis (post-calibration)
Color analysis (post-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (post-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (post-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (post-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (post-calibration)

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
13.2 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 4.4 ms rise
↘ 8.8 ms fall
The screen shows good response rates in our tests, but may be too slow for competitive gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 10 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is better than the average of all tested devices (25.6 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
21.6 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 12.4 ms rise
↘ 9.2 ms fall
The screen shows good response rates in our tests, but may be too slow for competitive gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 8 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is better than the average of all tested devices (41.2 ms).

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM detected 59.52 Hz

The display backlight flickers at 59.52 Hz (Likely utilizing PWM) .

The frequency of 59.52 Hz is very low, so the flickering may cause eyestrain and headaches after extended use.

In comparison: 53 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 8777 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 142900) Hz was measured.

Response times, as indicated above, however, are good. We measured a grey 50% / grey 80% response time of 21.6 ms (nearly half that of most competitors) and a black/white response time of 13.2 ms (once again, roughly half in comparison). Gamers are sure to appreciate this.

Outdoors, the panel is fairly easily visible thanks to the excellent brightness, good contrast, and most importantly, the matte panel finish. Viewing angles are decent but nowhere nearly as good as those of an IPS panel.

In the shade
In the shade
In the sun
In the sun

Performance

LatencyMon
LatencyMon

Of course, no capable gaming notebook display would ever be complete without suitable silicon to push its pixels, and the X7 DT v6 fortunately lacks nothing in this category. Decked out with an Intel Core i7-6820HK (overclocked by default to 4.0 GHz), an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (again, overclocked), 32 GB of DDR4 memory, and a solid-state/mechanical storage combo for both speed and capacity, it’s literally second to none. As previously mentioned, both the RAM and the storage configuration are easily upgradeable, too. The RAM in our unit was in the form of two 16 GB SODIMMs configured for dual-channel operation, but there still remains two open slots, for a total maximum of 64 GB (for those who really can’t get enough).

As expected, performance while operating unplugged is greatly constrained due to power consumption. A secondary run of 3DMark 06 on battery power produced a much lower score of 10243 (versus 34143 originally).

LatencyMon reveals no issues handling real-time audio and video streaming.

CPU-Z CPU
CPU-Z CPU
CPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Memory
CPU-Z Memory
CPU-Z RAM SPD
CPU-Z RAM SPD
GPU-Z
GPU-Z
ComputeMark
ComputeMark
SPECViewperf 12
SPECViewperf 12

Processor

The Intel Core i7-6820HK is a flagship quad-core CPU in the Skylake lineup—the only CPU featuring an unlocked multiplier for easy overclocking (similar to previous Extreme Editions). It’s manufactured using a 14 nm process and features stock clock rates of 2.7 to 3.6 GHz (4/2 cores: 3.2/3.4 GHz). The CPU carries a TDP of 45 W, the same as the Core i7-6700HQ found in a greater number of notebooks. Our testing has already revealed this to be an impressive chip—but can the X7 DT v6 tap into its full potential?

In short, yes. Thanks to the easy overclocking provided by the OC Launcher utility, we were able to set the frequency to the maximum setting (up to 4.0 GHz), where we still witnessed stable performance in real-world applications. The result was test scores which easily dwarf that of the competition, even (generally) a few percentage points above the Core i7-6820HK featured in the MSI GT73VR 6RF. Intel reportedly tested this CPU in overclocking up to 4.2 GHz with air cooling during internal testing—so it’s an efficient and powerful chip. Don’t miss our detailed dedicated CPU page for this processor here, complete with extensive testing performed on numerous other machines.

In our comparisons below, you might notice we’ve switched up the field just slightly: the 1070-equipped X7 is missing (as it isn’t quite as interesting an inclusion here), and in its place, the Eurocom Sky X7E2 notebook is introduced. That’s because the Eurocom is currently the top-ranked notebook in our GPU benchmarks, and the fact that we must invoke its presence should serve as foreshadowing for what we’re about to witness in our GPU benchmarks section.

Cinebench R11.5
Cinebench R11.5
Cinebench R15
Cinebench R15
Cinebench R11.5
CPU Single 64Bit
Aorus X7 DT v6
Intel Core i7-6820HK
1.92 Points ∼82%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
Intel Core i7-6820HK
1.88 Points ∼80% -2%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
Intel Core i7-6700K
1.72 Points ∼74% -10%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
Intel Core i7-6700HQ
1.69 Points ∼72% -12%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
Intel Core i7-6700HQ
1.56 Points ∼67% -19%
CPU Multi 64Bit
MSI GT73VR 6RF
Intel Core i7-6820HK
9.24 Points ∼34% +1%
Aorus X7 DT v6
Intel Core i7-6820HK
9.14 Points ∼34%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
Intel Core i7-6700K
8.55 Points ∼32% -6%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
Intel Core i7-6700HQ
7.47 Points ∼28% -18%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
Intel Core i7-6700HQ
7.3 Points ∼27% -20%
Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
Aorus X7 DT v6
Intel Core i7-6820HK
169 Points ∼82%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
Intel Core i7-6820HK
164 Points ∼79% -3%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
Intel Core i7-6700K
160 Points ∼77% -5%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
Intel Core i7-6700HQ
148 Points ∼71% -12%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
Intel Core i7-6700HQ
147 Points ∼71% -13%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Eurocom Sky X7E2
Intel Core i7-6700K
874 Points ∼28% +5%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
Intel Core i7-6820HK
836 Points ∼27% 0%
Aorus X7 DT v6
Intel Core i7-6820HK
832 Points ∼27%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
Intel Core i7-6700HQ
679 Points ∼22% -18%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
Intel Core i7-6700HQ
676 Points ∼22% -19%
wPrime 2.0x - 1024m
Aorus X7 DT v6
Intel Core i7-6820HK
296.6 s * ∼4%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
Intel Core i7-6700K
205.867 s * ∼2% +31%
Super Pi Mod 1.5 XS 32M - ---
Aorus X7 DT v6
Intel Core i7-6820HK
498 Seconds * ∼2%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
Intel Core i7-6700K
484.635 Seconds * ∼2% +3%

* ... smaller is better

Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
1.92 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
9.14 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
79.49 fps
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
169 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
832 Points
Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit
122.7 fps
Cinebench R15 Ref. Match 64Bit
99.6 %
Help

System Performance

Our synthetic system performance benchmarks also exalt the X7 DT v6, with scores at least a few percentage points above the other competitors. Scores of 8478, 5096, and 5353 points in PCMark 8 Creative Accelerated, Work Accelerated, and Home Accelerated, respectively, are beyond excellent results and are indicative of a very fast machine.

Subjectively, our impressions reinforce this: we hardly ever waited for anything to occur, though we did have some minor problems with the secondary drive that eventually led us to unmount it. This was most likely simply a bad drive, however.

PCMark 8 Home Accelerated
PCMark 8 Home Accelerated
PCMark 8 Creative Accelerated
PCMark 8 Creative Accelerated
PCMark 8 Work Accelerated
PCMark 8 Work Accelerated
PCMark 8
Work Score Accelerated v2
HP Omen 17-w110ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256
5394 Points ∼83% +1%
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
5353 Points ∼82%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, SanDisk SD8SNAT256G1002
5011 Points ∼77% -6%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
4816 Points ∼74% -10%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
4378 Points ∼67% -18%
Creative Score Accelerated v2
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
8576 Points ∼90% +1%
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
8478 Points ∼89%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
8227 Points ∼86% -3%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256
7128 Points ∼75% -16%
Home Score Accelerated v2
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
5096 Points ∼84%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256
4833 Points ∼79% -5%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, SanDisk SD8SNAT256G1002
4651 Points ∼76% -9%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
4579 Points ∼75% -10%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
4252 Points ∼70% -17%
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
5096 points
PCMark 8 Creative Score Accelerated v2
8478 points
PCMark 8 Work Score Accelerated v2
5353 points
Help

Storage Devices

The X7 DT v6 configuration we reviewed ships with two storage devices: one M.2 SSD and one 2.5-inch mechanical hard drive. The former is a Samsung SM951 NVMe PCI-E SSD, and it’s insanely fast, with sequential read/write speeds of 1971.14 MB/s and 1493.99 MB/s in AS SSD and 4K-64 read/write speeds of 1106.67 MB/s and 366.91 MB/s. This is far ahead of the rest of the competition and it explains the extremely high PCMark scores. These results were obtained following the installation of the Samsung Pro NVMe driver—without it, synthetic write speeds measured by AS SSD are artificially low.

The mechanical drive (HGST Travelstar 7K1000, model #HTS721010A9E630) is nothing special, but it is a 7200 RPM model which at least gives it an edge over the typical 5400 RPM dual-storage configurations in many gaming models. As previously mentioned, we actually experienced some issues with the mechanical drive in our unit, but it’s pretty clear that this was a fault of the particular drive we received and not a problem with the laptop itself.

Upgrades are easy down the road—as we covered earlier, there are two total M.2 NVMe slots (one open on our unit) alongside the 2.5-inch mechanical bay, the latter of which accepts any 7mm height drive.

CrystalDiskMark
CrystalDiskMark
AS SSD
AS SSD
AS SSD Copy Benchmark
AS SSD Copy Benchmark
PCMark 8 Storage
PCMark 8 Storage
CrystalDiskMark (HDD)
CrystalDiskMark (HDD)
HDTune (HDD)
HDTune (HDD)
The M.2 NVMe SSD
The M.2 NVMe SSD
The HGST hard drive
The HGST hard drive
Aorus X7 DT v6
Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
SanDisk SD8SNAT256G1002
HP Omen 17-w110ng
Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256
MSI GT73VR 6RF
2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
Eurocom Sky X7E2
Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
CrystalDiskMark 3.0
-67%
-38%
-37%
-1%
Write 4k QD32
419.1
256.3
-39%
295.3
-30%
441.8
5%
422.1
1%
Read 4k QD32
676.4
149.4
-78%
600.2
-11%
425
-37%
693.5
3%
Write 4k
161.1
75.74
-53%
153.3
-5%
65.68
-59%
144
-11%
Read 4k
52.86
21.44
-59%
42.7
-19%
31.37
-41%
51.54
-2%
Write 512
1507
287.8
-81%
294.7
-80%
915.8
-39%
1561
4%
Read 512
1064
294.8
-72%
616.2
-42%
698.1
-34%
1180
11%
Write Seq
1588
312.4
-80%
294.9
-81%
916.1
-42%
1576
-1%
Read Seq
1829
485.4
-73%
1156
-37%
914.3
-50%
1673
-9%
Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
Sequential Read: 1829 MB/s
Sequential Write: 1588 MB/s
512K Read: 1064 MB/s
512K Write: 1507 MB/s
4K Read: 52.86 MB/s
4K Write: 161.1 MB/s
4K QD32 Read: 676.4 MB/s
4K QD32 Write: 419.1 MB/s

GPU Performance

And now, the moment we’ve all been waiting for: GPU performance. Packing an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080, today’s configuration of the AORUS X7 DT v6 is perched among the most powerful of any gaming notebook in history. Can this Pascal-propelled wonder set new records in our benchmarks, even in spite of its slim form factor and somewhat portable demeanor (over 2 pounds lighter than the Eurocom Sky X7E2)?

It can, and it did. At full GPU overclock settings, with a 3DMark Fire Strike Extreme Graphics score of 10551 (2% above the Eurocom Sky score of 10382 and 3% above the MSI GT73VR’s score of 10246), the AORUS X7 DT v6 is one of the fastest gaming notebooks we’ve tested to date. Meanwhile, the Ice Storm Extreme Graphics score we received of 340743 is just unreal—59% above the MSI’s 214758, though 7% under the Eurcom Sky’s 365079. 3DMark 11 Performance GPU produced a similarly impressive 27135, though this score was a modest 2% and 4% below the MSI and Eurocom respectively. When the CPU is thrown into the mix, also, however, the AORUS X7 manages a 3DMark 11 Performance Combined that trumps them both: 10854.

3DMark
3DMark
3DMark Fire Strike Extreme
3DMark Fire Strike Extreme
3DMark Ice Storm Extreme
3DMark Ice Storm Extreme
3DMark 11
1280x720 Performance Combined
Aorus X7 DT v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
10854 Points ∼62%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K
10419 Points ∼59% -4%
Aorus X7 v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK
10344 Points ∼59% -5%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
8705 Points ∼50% -20%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
8396 Points ∼48% -23%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
7137 Points ∼41% -34%
1280x720 Performance GPU
Eurocom Sky X7E2
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K
28321 Points ∼56% +4%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
27685 Points ∼54% +2%
Aorus X7 DT v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
27135 Points ∼53%
Aorus X7 v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK
23591 Points ∼46% -13%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
22022 Points ∼43% -19%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
20656 Points ∼41% -24%
3DMark
Fire Strike Extreme Graphics
Aorus X7 DT v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
10551 Points ∼53%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K
10382 Points ∼52% -2%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
10246 Points ∼52% -3%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
7579 Points ∼38% -28%
1920x1080 Fire Strike Graphics
Aorus X7 DT v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
21928 Points ∼54%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K
21781 Points ∼54% -1%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
21270 Points ∼52% -3%
Aorus X7 v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK
17068 Points ∼42% -22%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
16525 Points ∼41% -25%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
15806 Points ∼39% -28%
1280x720 Cloud Gate Standard Graphics
Eurocom Sky X7E2
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K
125447 Points ∼68% +3%
Aorus X7 DT v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
122172 Points ∼66%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
103913 Points ∼56% -15%
Aorus X7 v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK
101012 Points ∼55% -17%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
86780 Points ∼47% -29%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
64973 Points ∼35% -47%
1920x1080 Ice Storm Extreme Graphics
Eurocom Sky X7E2
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K
365079 Points ∼50% +7%
Aorus X7 DT v6
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
340743 Points ∼47%
MSI GT73VR 6RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK
214758 Points ∼29% -37%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ
187717 Points ∼26% -45%
3DMark 06 Standard
34143 points
3DMark 11 Performance
19769 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score
169818 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score
31695 points
3DMark Fire Strike Score
16908 points
3DMark Fire Strike Extreme Score
9557 points
Help

Gaming Performance

Unsurprisingly, this translates to modern games being playable on any settings the heart desires, all the way up to the native 1440p resolution of the panel. And with the 120 Hz display panel taken into account, it’s a beautiful thing, indeed.

A quick note: while our 3DMark benchmarks were performed with the GPU overclock level set to 4 (maximum), the gaming benchmark scores were collected at just level 2. That means that slightly more performance is likely possible still over the results we show below!

Sleeping Dogs - 1920x1080 Extreme Preset AA:Extreme (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
140.6 fps ∼95%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
147.8 fps ∼100% +5%
BioShock Infinite - 1920x1080 Ultra Preset, DX11 (DDOF) (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
164.7 fps ∼62%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256
103.8 (min: 19.8, max: 180.2) fps ∼39% -37%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
168.7 fps ∼64% +2%
Metro: Last Light - 1920x1080 Very High (DX11) AF:16x (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
130 fps ∼76%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
131.6 fps ∼76% +1%
Thief - 1920x1080 Very High Preset AA:FXAA & High SS AF:8x (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
125 fps ∼88%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
125.5 fps ∼88% 0%
Batman: Arkham Knight - 1920x1080 High / On AA:SM AF:16x (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
141 fps ∼100%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
105 fps ∼74% -26%
Fallout 4 - 1920x1080 Ultra Preset AA:T AF:16x (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
124 fps ∼74%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
133.7 fps ∼80% +8%
Rise of the Tomb Raider - 1920x1080 Very High Preset AA:FX AF:16x (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
118 fps ∼73%
Aorus X7 v6
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7
97 fps ∼60% -18%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, SanDisk SD8SNAT256G1002
88.7 fps ∼55% -25%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256
89.7 (min: 80, max: 102) fps ∼56% -24%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
119.4 fps ∼74% +1%
Doom - 1920x1080 Ultra Preset AA:SM (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
153 fps ∼77%
Aorus X7 v6
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7
128 fps ∼64% -16%
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, SanDisk SD8SNAT256G1002
125.1 fps ∼63% -18%
HP Omen 17-w110ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256
116.6 (min: 81, max: 183) fps ∼58% -24%
Eurocom Sky X7E2
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6700K, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
144.2 fps ∼72% -6%
Mafia 2 - 1920x1080 high AA:0x AF:16x (sort by value)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
214.6 fps ∼97%
low med. high ultra
Mafia 2 (2010) 214.6fps
Sleeping Dogs (2012) 140.6fps
BioShock Infinite (2013) 164.7fps
Metro: Last Light (2013) 130fps
Thief (2014) 125fps
Batman: Arkham Knight (2015) 141fps
Fallout 4 (2015) 124fps
Rise of the Tomb Raider (2016) 118fps
Doom (2016) 153fps

Game benchmarks @ 2560x1440, Ultra settings

Average FPS
Sleeping Dogs 90.6
Bioshock Infinite 165.76
Metro: Last Light 98
Thief 99
Batman: Arkham Knight 112
Fallout 4 89
Rise of the Tomb Raider 83.5
DOOM 112
Mafia 2 196.7

Stress Test

We use Prime95 and FurMark for CPU and GPU stress testing, respectively. It will be very interesting to see how the AORUS performs here given its slim form factor.

While overclocked to 4.0 GHz (the maximum available within the Command & Control software), the AORUS first pushes clock rates of 3.8 GHz across all four cores nearly consistently, with only occasional dips to 3.4 and 3.6 GHz on an individual core at a time. After around 45 seconds, the CPU temperatures (as measured by HWiNFO) stretch above 80 °C and the clock rates recede to a more reasonable (though still above the stock maximum Turbo rate) of 3.3-3.4 GHz across all four cores. The fans never reach their highest speeds for more than a few seconds.

When overclocked to Level 2 in the Command & Control software, GPU stress begins with clock rates near the Boost maximum of 1733 MHz before quickly dipping into the ~1550 MHz range. Temperatures, meanwhile, climb precipitously to a measured maximum of 77 °C, where they remain. If overclocking is maxed out at Level 4, another 100 MHz or so of power can be squeezed out of the GPU consistently, with frequencies hovering within the 1620 – 1650 MHz range with occasional spikes above 1800 MHz. Temperatures still never exceed 79 °C, which is both impressive and reassuring.

Finally, stressing both CPU and GPU simultaneously while both fully overclocked to the maximum level leaves us with sustainable GPU temperatures of 78 °C—and stable clock rates with them—but blistering CPU heat climbing swiftly into the 99 °C range, prompting near-immediate throttling to 2.6 GHz across all four cores. Spikes to ~3.6 GHz are still present on occasion, but 2.6 GHz is the norm. This is hardly surprising, but it is the point at which the AORUS X7 DT v6 finally reaches its limit.

Full CPU stress
Full CPU stress
Full GPU stress
Full GPU stress
CPU + GPU combined stress
CPU + GPU combined stress
CPU Clock (GHz) GPU Clock (MHz) Average CPU Temperature (°C) Average GPU Temperature (°C)
Prime95 Stress 3.3 - 3.4 -- 80 --
FurMark Stress -- 1620 - 1650 -- 79
Prime95 + FurMark Stress 2.6 1620 - 1650 99 78

Emissions

System Noise

As you might expect, the AORUS X7 DT v6 gets pretty noisy under load; we measured 51.7 dB(A) on average while gaming. That’s compared to lower numbers across the board for the rest of the competitors—anywhere from 3% (MSI GT73VR 6RF) to 25% (Asus GL502VS) quieter. The 1070-equipped Aorus X7 v6 we reviewed a couple of weeks ago also manages a considerably lower noise level of 43 dB(A), but this is hardly surprising given the substantially higher power consumption (roughly 30 W higher) and thus correspondingly higher heat production of the 1080 versus the 1070. Peak noise levels of both Aorus notebooks are nearly identical (around 55.7 db(A) as measured), and are not too far off those of its peers—apart from the MSI GT73VR, which rockets to an ear-splitting 64 dB(A) with Turbo Fan enabled.

Idle levels are much more reasonable at around 32 to 35 dB(A), the same as the rest of the tested machines. It’s worth reiterating that Gigabyte provides the user full control over these noise levels (at the possible expense of performance and heat levels) via the Command & Control software. If “gaming” mode is left on all the time, the fans are still quite audible even while nothing is happening—they never shut off.

Noise profile
Noise profile
The dual-fan cooling system is quite effective...
The dual-fan cooling system is quite effective...
...with large exhaust vents and intake from both top and bottom.
...with large exhaust vents and intake from both top and bottom.

Noise Level

Idle
32.2 / 35.2 / 35.2 dB(A)
Load
51.7 / 55.7 dB(A)
  red to green bar
 
 
30 dB
silent
40 dB(A)
audible
50 dB(A)
loud
 
min: dark, med: mid, max: light   BK Precision 732A (15 cm distance)   environment noise: 28.6 dB(A)
Aorus X7 DT v6
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e
Aorus X7 v6
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, SanDisk SD8SNAT256G1002
HP Omen 17-w110ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6700HQ, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256
MSI GT73VR 6RF
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 6820HK, 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0)
Noise
0%
6%
3%
-1%
off / environment *
28.6
30
-5%
30
-5%
30
-5%
29.2
-2%
Idle Minimum *
32.2
33
-2%
32
1%
33
-2%
32
1%
Idle Average *
35.2
35
1%
33
6%
34
3%
32
9%
Idle Maximum *
35.2
40
-14%
34
3%
35
1%
35
1%
Load Average *
51.7
43
17%
39
25%
45
13%
50
3%
Load Maximum *
55.7
54
3%
51
8%
52
7%
64
-15%

* ... smaller is better

Temperature

Apart from a couple of hot spots in the upper quadrants of the bottom of the unit, the Aorus X7 DT v6 actually performs impressively well with regard to operating temperatures. Of course, there are no problems while idling, where the unit manages average temperatures of 25-26 °C on both top and bottom (at a room temperature of 20 °C). Under load, the hot spots begin to pop up, but even then, most of them are confined to the bottom of the machine. The upper center quadrant of the top of the base unit does eventually reach 45.4 °C, but that’s a less critical area of the system while gaming. The rest of the keyboard merely becomes warm, with the left and right sides remaining at 33 °C and below (impressively). The palm rest, meanwhile, didn’t register a reading above 30.8 °C.

Average temperatures under load on the top and bottom of the base unit are just 33.6 °C and 39.8 °C, below that of most competitors overall (especially the top of the base unit), with the exception of the MSI GT73VR (~35 °C top/bottom), which is no surprise given that it almost resembles a leaf blower with Turbo Fan enabled. The cooler palm rest and keyboard temperatures of the X7 are due in part to its clever ventilation design, which features intake vents situated at the top left and right corners of the top side of the base unit. This both ensures good intake airflow (when taken in conjunction with the intake vents on the bottom, which are still intact as well) and helps keep those areas of the keyboard surround cooler. This was a good design choice which seems to have had a positive effect on overall temperatures.

Thermal profile, top of base unit
Thermal profile, top of base unit
Thermal profile, bottom
Thermal profile, bottom
Max. Load
 34.2 °C
94 F
45.4 °C
114 F
37.2 °C
99 F
 
 31.2 °C
88 F
36.8 °C
98 F
33 °C
91 F
 
 27.6 °C
82 F
26.6 °C
80 F
30.8 °C
87 F
 
Maximum: 45.4 °C = 114 F
Average: 33.6 °C = 92 F
46.8 °C
116 F
58.2 °C
137 F
40.8 °C
105 F
38.6 °C
101 F
39.4 °C
103 F
36 °C
97 F
33 °C
91 F
34.2 °C
94 F
31.6 °C
89 F
Maximum: 58.2 °C = 137 F
Average: 39.8 °C = 104 F
Power Supply (max.)  53 °C = 127 F | Room Temperature 20 °C = 68 F | Fluke 62 Mini IR Thermometer

Speakers

The X7’s internal speakers are nothing special considering its size, so users will definitely want to have a pair of headphones handy. Very little intensity on the low-frequency end of the spectrum is present, with most of the emphasis placed on mid- to high-frequencies. However, it’s worth noting that through the use of the included Realtek post-processing software, we were able to at least balance this out a bit. See our attached screenshot for the settings that we, subjectively, preferred.

Our audio settings
Our audio settings
dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs203835.6382534.937.534.9313533.2354032.733.732.75034.632.934.6633332.8338033.831.533.810037.830.337.812539.230.939.21604730.34720050.629.150.625052.32852.331555.628.255.640058.227.758.250058.927.858.963054.827.354.880053.127.653.1100054.126.854.1125058.527.758.516006125.661200055.924.355.9250057.123.857.1315059.423.559.4400057.923.957.9500063.623.563.6630066.123.366.1800063.523.163.51000059.623.159.61250051.723.151.71600046.823.346.8SPL72.337.572.3N30.4330.4median 55.9Aorus X7 DT v6median 26.8median 55.9Delta3.92.23.937.942.234.836.927.730.132.740.628.630.426.427.629.530.826.131.424.627.922.336.523.755.322.662.320.563.219.562.519.262.91967.818.668.91868.418.363.91970.518.171.118.268.818.470.618.374.718.474.518.577.818.67518.678.818.57618.665.730.8851.562.2median 18.6HP Omen 17-w110ngmedian 68.41.66.6hearing rangehide median Pink Noise
Aorus X7 DT v6 audio analysis

(±) | speaker loudness is average but good (72.34 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(±) | reduced bass - on average 8.8% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (12.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 2.3% away from median
(±) | linearity of mids is average (9.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(±) | higher highs - on average 5.1% higher than median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (9.6% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (18% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 58% of all tested devices in this class were better, 5% similar, 37% worse
» The best had a delta of 6%, average was 17%, worst was 37%
Compared to all devices tested
» 31% of all tested devices were better, 6% similar, 63% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

HP Omen 17-w110ng audio analysis

(+) | speakers can play relatively loud (85 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 22.3% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (13.2% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 2.7% away from median
(+) | mids are linear (4.9% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(±) | higher highs - on average 5.9% higher than median
(+) | highs are linear (5.3% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (18.1% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 58% of all tested devices in this class were better, 5% similar, 37% worse
» The best had a delta of 6%, average was 17%, worst was 37%
Compared to all devices tested
» 31% of all tested devices were better, 6% similar, 63% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Frequency Comparison (Checkbox selectable!)
Graph 1: Pink Noise 100% Vol.; Graph 2: Audio off

Energy Management

Power Consumption

Obviously, the X7 DT v6 is a very hungry machine. Idle values are quite high indeed, primarily because switchable graphics are not enabled on this machine (the GTX 1080 is always active). Under load, the notebook reached a maximum recorded power draw of 250.8 W, which is above the limits of the 230 W adapter—though the average was still just 205.6 W, below that threshold. This is still well below the power needs of the MSI GT73VR 6RF (average: 224.4 W), mostly because that notebook also includes a 4K IPS panel which is quite a bit more demanding than the TN panel in the AORUS.

It should also be noted that the machine draws an abnormally large amount of power while off and/or in sleep mode.

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 6.6 / 12.6 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 31.5 / 33.9 / 34.6 Watt
Load midlight 205.6 / 250.8 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
Aorus X7 DT v6
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), Samsung SM951 MZVPV512HDGL m.2 PCI-e, TN LED, 2560x1440, 17.3
Aorus X7 v6
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7, TN LED, 2560x1440, 17.3
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
6700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), SanDisk SD8SNAT256G1002, IPS, 1920x1080, 15.6
HP Omen 17-w110ng
6700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV256, IPS, 1920x1080, 17.3
MSI GT73VR 6RF
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 2x SanDisk X400 1TB M.2 SD8SN8U1T001122 (RAID 0), IPS, 3840x2160, 17.3
Power Consumption
10%
33%
31%
-2%
Idle Minimum *
31.5
29
8%
20
37%
19
40%
28.9
8%
Idle Average *
33.9
31
9%
24
29%
25
26%
30.6
10%
Idle Maximum *
34.6
38
-10%
29
16%
31
10%
33.1
4%
Load Average *
205.6
111
46%
86
58%
90
56%
224.4
-9%
Load Maximum *
250.8
253
-1%
183
27%
193
23%
302.6
-21%

* ... smaller is better

Battery Life

We never dwell much on the subject of battery life as it applies to gaming notebooks, since the full performance of the system is not possible unplugged anyway—and portability is really more a matter of moving from room to room, finding an outlet, and gaming. Because the X7 DT v6 features dGPU output only, there must be some compromise with regard to the battery life; however, in return, we're treated to the benefits of permanently discrete graphic output, such as G-Sync and HDR gameplay. Just 94 minutes of operation under load and 2 hours, 24 minutes of web surfing are hardly impressive numbers. Most competitors offer a little more, but this is one area where we shrug our shoulders.

Classic Test
Classic Test
Readers Test
Readers Test
Surfing w/ Wi-Fi
Surfing w/ Wi-Fi
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
3h 02min
NBC WiFi Websurfing Battery Test 1.3
2h 24min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 34min
Aorus X7 DT v6
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 94 Wh
Aorus X7 v6
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 94 Wh
Asus Strix GL502VS-FY032T
6700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 62 Wh
HP Omen 17-w110ng
6700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 95 Wh
MSI GT73VR 6RF
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 75.2 Wh
Battery Runtime
26%
11%
77%
25%
Reader / Idle
182
243
34%
432
137%
306
68%
WiFi v1.3
144
182
26%
196
36%
247
72%
198
38%
Load
94
58
-38%
115
22%
65
-31%

Pros

+ record-setting GPU performance
+ extremely fast CPU
+ excellent storage speeds
+ easy overclocking of both CPU and GPU
+ simple and powerful fan speed controls
+ innovative cooling design
+ attractive (and comparably lightweight) design
+ 120 Hz screen refresh rate, good response times
+ great keyboard
+ abundance of keyboard lighting and macro options
+ easy maintenance and upgrade options

Cons

- subtle horizontal lines visible on screen
- TN panel with pedestrian viewing angles and color reproduction
- loud operation under load (with sufficient cooling settings applied)
- weak speakers
- short battery life

Verdict

The AORUS X7 DT v6
The AORUS X7 DT v6

The AORUS X7 DT v6 is one of the most powerful gaming notebooks we’ve reviewed to date here at Notebookcheck, and substantially lighter than most of the competition, to boot. Thanks to the awesome power of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 combined with the unlocked multiplier of the Intel Core i7-6820HK—alongside Gigabyte’s excellent integrated system management software—the AORUS X7 DT v6 can be easily overclocked from the moment it’s powered on. And, as a result of that and its effective (and innovative) cooling design, it posts blistering scores across practically all benchmarks: some of the highest we have seen to date in our database.

It accomplishes all of this with a weight of just 3.25 kg and a sleek magnesium chassis just 30 mm thick. The X7 can literally handle any game you throw at it, probably at highest settings, and most likely at the native resolution (1440p) of the panel. The display, by the way, is also in many ways a highlight: although it’s only a TN panel with average viewing angles and color accuracy, it also sports quick response times and a 120 Hz refresh rate for video that’s as buttery smooth as the action the GPU can render. The only gripe in this department—though it may prove considerable in the eyes of some users—is the presence of visible horizontal lines on the panel thanks to the display technology. This truly is only noticeable on static screens, however, and does not detrimentally affect motion, whether video or gaming. Provided this isn’t too much of a bother, the X7 would also serve as a compelling option for a video editing workstation.

Input devices are also very good, build quality and casing stability is excellent, and most of the package truly feels like a palpable upgrade over previous entries in the AORUS lineup.  What shortfalls do exist are relatively minor and/or expected: the speakers are disappointing, though a bit of tweaking in the included post-processing app leaves them acceptable. The machine is quite loud under load—but the user does have direct control over the noise/performance ratio thanks to Gigabyte’s Command & Control software. Finally, battery life is fairly poor thanks to high power consumption and a lack of switchable graphics—but for anyone planning on buying the X7 for battery life, we might suggest they reevaluate their priorities and expectations anyway.

In short, this is one of the best gaming notebooks we’ve tested to date. If you can stomach the cost, you will not come away disappointed.

Aorus X7 DT v6 - 12/05/2016 v6
Steve Schardein

Chassis
83 / 98 → 85%
Keyboard
87%
Pointing Device
78%
Connectivity
66 / 81 → 81%
Weight
55 / 10-66 → 80%
Battery
65%
Display
82%
Games Performance
100%
Application Performance
96%
Temperature
85 / 95 → 89%
Noise
57 / 90 → 63%
Audio
70%
Camera
65 / 85 → 76%
Add Points
+1%
Average
71%
86%
Gaming - Weighted Average

Pricecompare

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Aorus X7 DT v6 Notebook Review
Steve Schardein, 2016-11-22 (Update: 2016-11-24)
Steve Schardein
Steve Schardein - Review Editor - @othersteve
In grade school, my first computer—an Apple IIGS—started it all for me. Later, in the nineties, if I wasn’t repairing computers for family and friends, I was busy cooking up nifty Visual Basic projects and playing PC games like Command & Conquer and Heroes of Might and Magic. Soon, much of my free time was spent moderating popular gaming forums and covering the industry for various websites. All the while, I never stopped repairing computers, and in 2006, I started a technology consulting company in Louisville, KY—Triple-S Computers—which I have been fortunate to nurture to great success by specializing in not only repairs, but also new machine consultations and purchasing, data recovery, and malware/security. And since 2012, I have proudly contributed many dozens of reviews to Notebookcheck, a site which I have long considered to be the ultimate authority on laptops and related technology. Today, I am truly living my dream: still a child at heart, ever-curious, constantly learning, and thankful to you, our readers.