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Alleged Apple A14 Geekbench results show potential iPhone 12 chip clocked at 3.1 GHz outscoring all previous iPhone SoCs and even the iPad Pro

An alleged Apple A14 SoC has been racking up huge Geekbench 5 scores. (Image source: Web24 News)
An alleged Apple A14 SoC has been racking up huge Geekbench 5 scores. (Image source: Web24 News)
Some extraordinary Geekbench results for a supposed Apple A14 SoC have been posted on the Weibo social network. The apparent mixture of Geekbench 4 and 5 information reveals that the chip was clocked at 3,090 MHz and features 6 cores. The hexa-core processor amassed huge test scores: 1,658 points for the single-core benchmark and 4,612 points for the multi-core test.
Daniel R Deakin,

Alleged information pertaining to an Apple A14 SoC will certainly ruffle some feathers with competitors if it ends up being genuine. The details were posted on Weibo by noted tipster Ice universe, who has been generally reliable with leaking accurate technical information. However, the image he has posted that reveals these startling A14 results seems to mix the scores from Geekbench 5 with the design format of Geekbench 4 (see image below). It might be a deliberate action by the leaker or it could indicate a fake report, so take it with a pinch of salt for now.

The details for this apparently mighty Apple A14 processor depict a 6-core SoC that can be clocked at over 3 GHz, which is quite a feat in itself. Unsurprisingly, the Geekbench 5 scores are very high: 1,658 points for the single-core test and 4,612 points for the multi-core test. Looking at the current Geekbench chart for iOS devices, the leader in the single-core test is the A13 Bionic-powered iPhone 11 Pro Max on 1,330 points. The A14 demolishes this score and there is no Android device that can currently come near it either, regardless of the SoC (Snapdragon, Exynos, Kirin, etc.).

If the single-core score isn’t impressive enough, then the Apple A14 chip’s multi-core score is astounding, and if the A14 ends up being the central component of the iPhone 12 then Apple will be setting new bars with that smartphone. The Geekbench 5 multi-core chart for iOS is topped by the powerful 11-inch iPad Pro, with its A12X Bionic processor helping it score 4,607 points. The alleged A14 just slips past this score, but it also completely smashes anything in smartphone form, with the iPhone 11 Pro Max way behind on 3,435 points. Once again, nothing from the Android side comes close to the A14’s result.

As for the veracity of this benchmark leak, in Ice universe’s defense, the machine translation of his Weibo post suggests that this is a “suspected” Apple A14 processor, so there’s always the chance it could be something else entirely. But if it is the future SoC for the iPhone 12 series, competitors like Samsung and Huawei better have some secret weapons stashed away for their future smartphone releases to compete with it.

Alleged Geekbench details. (Image source: Ice universe)
Alleged Geekbench details. (Image source: Ice universe)
Single-core and multi-core comparison. (Image source: Ice universe)
Single-core and multi-core comparison. (Image source: Ice universe)

Source(s)

Weibo (in Chinese)

LinusTechTips

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 03 > Alleged Apple A14 Geekbench results show potential iPhone 12 chip clocked at 3.1 GHz outscoring all previous iPhone SoCs and even the iPad Pro
Daniel R Deakin, 2020-03-16 (Update: 2020-03-16)
Daniel R Deakin
Daniel R Deakin - Managing Editor News
My interest in technology began after I was presented with an Atari 800XL home computer in the mid-1980s. I especially enjoy writing about technological advances, compelling rumors, and intriguing tech-related leaks. I have a degree in International Relations and Strategic Studies and count my family, reading, writing, and travel as the main passions of my life. I have been with Notebookcheck since 2012.