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IFA 2017 | Acer's new peripherals: Predator x35 monitor, Predator Galea 500 headset, and Predator Cestus 500 mouse

Acer Cestus 500 gaming mouse. (Source: Acer)
Acer Cestus 500 gaming mouse. (Source: Acer)
Along with their flagship gaming desktop, Acer announced a 35-inch HDR ultra wide curved gaming monitor using quantum dot technology, a gaming headset with directional sound, and a gaming mouse that features a hardware button to change the firmness of the mouse click.

The item that most people were excited about from Acer's IFA presentation was their new Predator Orion 9000 gaming desktop featuring up to 18 cores, four GPUs, and 128 GB RAM. But there were also three other related products from Acer that they hope will improve your gaming experience.

The first is the Acer Predator X35, a 35-inch ultra wide G-SYNC gaming monitor with a resolution of 3440 x 1440 and a 1800R curve. Acer has chosen an HDR panel using quantum dot technology for improved contrast. Quantum dot is unusual to see in a gaming monitor, but it is a technology that some will be familiar with from Samsung's high-end TV panels. The screen is split into 512 individually controlled lighting zones so that localized areas can be dimmed or lit separately meaning that dark parts of a bright scene don't get washed out or vice versa. Acer 'BlueLightShield' functionality is installed in the software which provides four stages of blue light reduction for eye health. Acer has advertised wide viewing angles up to 178 degrees for the VA panel.

Next is the Acer Predator Galea 500 gaming headset. Acer has used their 'TrueHarmoney 3D Soundscape' technology to give directional sound, a useful addition for playing first person shooters. The driver diaphragm is made of bio-cellulose with a rubber surround, and there are three inbuilt EQ settings.

Finally, there is the Acer Predator Cestus 500 gaming mouse with a dual switch design. Users of certain Logitech mice might be familiar with the hardware switch that changes the scroll wheel from 'clicky' to 'smooth.' Acer's dual switch functions similarly, except that it adjusts the amount of resistance for the left and right mouse buttons. For example, if a user is playing a first person shooter, they can reduce the resistance on the click to potentially get a few milliseconds extra response time. When browsing the web, they can increase the resistance to minimize the risk of accidental clicks. There is RGB lighting with eight patterns, five onboard profiles, and eight programmable buttons.

The Predator X35 monitor will be available in Q1 2018 with pricing to be announced closer to launch. The Predator Galea 500 headset goes on sale in November at US$300 or 300 Euro. The Predator Cestus 500 mouse is available in November and will retail for US$80 or 90 Euro.

Acer Predator X35 gaming monitor. (Source: Acer)
Acer Predator X35 gaming monitor. (Source: Acer)
Acer Predator X35 gaming monitor. (Source: Acer)
Acer Predator X35 gaming monitor. (Source: Acer)
Acer Predator X35 gaming monitor. (Source: Acer)
Acer Predator X35 gaming monitor. (Source: Acer)
Acer Galea 500 gaming headset. (Source: Acer)
Acer Galea 500 gaming headset. (Source: Acer)
Acer Galea 500 gaming headset. (Source: Acer)
Acer Galea 500 gaming headset. (Source: Acer)
Acer Cestus 500 gaming mouse. (Source: Acer)
Acer Cestus 500 gaming mouse. (Source: Acer)
Acer Cestus 500 gaming mouse. (Source: Acer)
Acer Cestus 500 gaming mouse. (Source: Acer)
 
 

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 09 > Acer's new peripherals: Predator x35 monitor, Predator Galea 500 headset, and Predator Cestus 500 mouse
Craig Ward, 2017-09- 2 (Update: 2017-09- 2)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.