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AMD processor sales surpass Intel sales at Germany's largest online PC component retailer

Ryzen is playing a large part in AMD's return to relevance in the performance segment. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen is playing a large part in AMD's return to relevance in the performance segment. (Source: AMD)
Data collected from Germany's largest online PC component retailer shows that sales of Ryzen CPUs are now higher than Intel's core series, giving AMD the leading market share in the performance space. AMD also holds the leading market revenue, and has 60 percent of the top ten highest selling processor models.

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An enthusiast on Reddit, ingebor, has collected and collated sales data from Mindfactory.de (Germany's largest online computer component marketplace) which shows that AMD surpassed Intel in market share for August. This is allegedly the first time since the AMD Athlon 64 and Athlon 64 X2 days in the mid-2000’s. These results show how popular AMD’s new architecture is among those who build their systems.

After the first Ryzen CPUs came out in March AMD had only 27.6 percent market share but 35.6 percent revenue share. This disparity between market share and revenue was because the weighted average of the sale price for the three top-end Ryzen Processors (R7 1700, R7 1700X, R7 1800X) was 413 Euro (US$490) compared to 285 Euro (US$338) for Intel. Now in August, AMD has passed Intel and achieved 56.1 percent market share and 54 percent revenue share. The reason for revenue more closely matching market share is that with the full Ryzen range released, the weighted average sale price is more similar between the two manufacturers.

There are some interesting statistics when considering the raw figures. AMD has four processors which are selling in significant numbers, in numerical order they are R5 1600, R5 1600X, R7 1700, and R7 1700XAMD Ryzen 7 1700X SoC - Benchmarks and Specs. Meanwhile, Intel only has two CPUs selling in significant numbers, the i7-7700K and i5-7600K. Intel’s sales and revenue aren't as diverse as AMD’s with 41 percent of their sales coming from a solitary product, the i7-7700K, while AMD’s most popular CPU, the R5 1600, makes up just over a third of their sales at 34 percent. Finally, Threadripper is bringing a disproportionate amount of revenue for AMD while also outperforming the core i9 in sales.

Some weaknesses in the dataset which we must keep in mind when looking at these numbers are:

  • This data comes from a single (large) online marketplace
  • This data originates from a single country
  • With Coffee Lake desktop chips releasing soon, some Intel fans who may have updated to Kaby Lake might now be waiting for Coffee Lake.
  • This data is on individual consumer sales of CPUs. Pre-built desktops and laptops from the likes of HP, Dell, and Lenovo vastly outnumber the sales of individual components, and there are relatively few pre-built systems using AMD CPUs.

The top 10 processors in order of sales on Mindfactory.de are:

Sales of AMD vs Intel CPUs on Mindfactory.de (Source: ingebor/Reddit)
Sales of AMD vs Intel CPUs on Mindfactory.de (Source: ingebor/Reddit)
Revenue of AMD vs Intel CPUs on Mindfactory.de (Source: ingebor/Reddit)
Revenue of AMD vs Intel CPUs on Mindfactory.de (Source: ingebor/Reddit)
Raw figures of AMD vs intel CPUs on Mindfactory.de (Source: ingebor/Reddit)
Raw figures of AMD vs intel CPUs on Mindfactory.de (Source: ingebor/Reddit)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 09 > AMD processor sales surpass Intel sales at Germany's largest online PC component retailer
Craig Ward, 2017-09- 2 (Update: 2017-09- 3)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.