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HP ElitePad 1000 G2 (F1Q77EA) Tablet Review

Till Schönborn (translated by Kevin S.), 08/26/2014

Smart business idea? HP is not the first manufacturer to bring a slim 10-inch tablet onto the business market - but never before has this concept been realized that consistently: for around 1,000 Euros (~$1319), the buyer not only get Intel's fastest Atom processor, including 4 GB RAM and 64-bit operating system, but also an integrated LTE module as well as different safety features.

For the original German review, see here.

Nowadays, tablets are first and foremost entertainment devices - browsing, video playback and simple casual games count among the most used applications on the iPad & co. However, the versatile devices have become more and more important in the business segment; not least because Windows 8(.1) is a modern, x86-based platform with useful touch support. Especially devices with Intel's Bay Trail SoCs have become more and more popular.

After Lenovo released its ThinkPad 10 a couple of weeks ago, we would now like to pay attention to HP's ElitePad 1000 G2. At first glance, both competitors show many similarities: next to the previously mentioned Bay Trail processor, more specifically the Atom Z3795, both tablets are equipped with a 10-inch WUXGA display as well as with an (optional) LTE radio. While Lenovo solely relies on 32-bit Windows, HP installs the more promising 64-bit version. In combination with 4 GB RAM and 128 GB flash memory one has to pay 1,000 Euros (~$1319) for the ElitePad - around 150 Euros (~$197) more than for a similarly equipped ThinkPad 10. 

Case

High-quality aluminum chassis
High-quality aluminum chassis

For such a premium price we also expect premium quality. To satisfy this goal, the manufacturer uses a high-quality aluminum chassis, which covers almost the entire back of the tablet. Only a small strip on the top edge is made of dark plastic with soft-touch coating in order to not influence the reception of the integrated antennas. The front consists as usual of the display, which is hidden behind a layer of particularly resistant Corning Gorilla Glass 3.

With a thickness of 9.2 millimeters and almost 700 grams, the ElitePad is slightly thinner, but significantly heavier than Lenovo's ThinkPad 10 (10.3 mm, 576 gram). However, our device scores with its higher torsional rigidity, which HP confidently advertises with the slogan "it's built to last." However: despite good processing qualities, some smaller flaws can be noted - the chassis creaks subtly when it is compressed at the transition between front pane and frame. These details will not influence reliability and durability of the device. 

Connectivity

Despite its professional orientation, the ElitePad does not offer many interfaces. On the contrary: without additional accessories, the user is restricted to a microSD slot, an audio jack (3.5 millimeters) and the so-called "system connector." The latter is not only meant for charging but also allows for the use of different docking stations (more on that later) and adaptors. A corresponding USB 2.0 cable was included, further variants are available for low prices in specialty stores (for example, adaptors for HDMI/VGA, around 43 Euros, ~$56).

Top: 3.5 mm jack, screen rotation lock, on/off switch
Top: 3.5 mm jack, screen rotation lock, on/off switch
Bottom: docking station connector
Bottom: docking station connector

Communication

With the exception of the newest Wi-Fi turbo IEEE 802.11 ac, the ElitePad supports almost all important, modern radio standards. The tablet communicates with 802.11 a/b/g/n wireless networks, which send within the 2.4 or 5 GHz frequency bands, and it achieves data rates of up to 300 Mbit/s (2x2 TX/RX). In the test with a TP-Link Archer C7 router we could only achieve around 7 MB/s under practically relevant conditions (one brick wall, around 4 meters beeline). However, we think that the high range and excellent stability of the connection, which is indeed on the level of a similarly expensive business notebook, are more important. The Bluetooth 4.0 interface, which allows for an external keyboard for example, performs equally flawless.  

Next to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, our configuration has an integrated LTE module which is also responsible for the high purchase price of the tablet. If you want to save some money, you should go for a slightly slower HSPA+-modem or renounce to any kind of WWAN support. 

Cameras

There is a camera on both the front and back of the device in order to be well-equipped for video chats (2.0 megapixels) as well as for sophisticated photos and videos (8.0-megapixel, autofocus and LED flash). In terms of quality we are nevertheless disappointed: While the high resolution main sensor has acceptable sharpness, but pale and washed-out  colors, the smaller webcam behaves the other way round. In general, better results can be achieved with a current mid-table smartphone.

Front cam
Front cam
Main cam
Main cam

Safety 

Even though the user has to renounce a few classical safety features such as fingerprint scanner or Smart-Card reader, the professional orientation of the ElitePad is clearly recognizable. Next to the mandatory TPM (Trusted Platform Module), this orientation becomes apparent when considering the preinstalled software package, which includes tools such as HP Client Security (password management, drive encoding, safe delete of data).

Accessories

For our test, HP not only provided us with the actual tablet but also with various accessories, which (depending on the chosen configuration) have to be bought separately. All models are probably equipped with a compact 10-Watt adaptor; alternatively we recommend the ElitePad Docking Station (C0M84AA, 150 Euros, ~$197). Next to a more powerful 40-Watt adaptor for a shorter charging time, the docking station adds several useful interfaces (4x USB 2.0, VGA, HDMI, Fast Ethernet). Besides, several covers or so-called "Jackets" with additional interfaces or secondary battery are offered. Details concerning the optional input devices can be found in the next chapter.

Warranty

Not so business-like is the short warranty of only 12 months. At the time we tested the device, we could not find any possible upgrades, also called HP "Care Pack."

Input Devices

Windows keyboard in landscape...
Windows keyboard in landscape...
...and portrait format
...and portrait format

Touchscreen and further Input Possibilities

As for any other tablet, a touchscreen is used as central input device, in that case a capacitively working touchscreen. Precision and sensitivity are no points of criticism; nevertheless, certain actions (for example, moving a window on the desktop) are not as direct and smooth as a Haswell-based device. To most users, this will become only apparent - if at all - in direct comparison and is due to the slightly lower performance of the Atom SoCs in combination with the relatively high display resolution. 

We do not go into detail for the known Windows 8 display keyboard. Instead, we would like to emphasize the large amount of optional accessories that HP offers for the ElitePad. Among other things, the HP Bluetooth Keyboard K4000 (F3J73AA), which convinces with a thorough processing quality and stable construction, can be purchased for 35 Euros (~$46). Keystroke and typing feel are also on the level of a high-quality business keyboard. There is also a digitizer support for the tablet which allows for the use of active input pens like the HP Executive Tablet Pen G2 (F3G73AA, around 50 Euros, ~$65). Its very thin tip as well as the convincing precision (deviation less than one millimeter) facilitates handwritten inputs especially.

Display

Just like for Lenovo's ThinkPad 10, the ElitePad 1000 G2 display has a resolution of 1920x1200 pixels, which corresponds to 16:10. In terms of screen size of 10.1-inch, pixel density amounts to 225 ppi – not really record-breaking, but sufficient for a sharp representation from a typical viewing distance. With that, HP avoids problems with older Windows software which is often only conditionally suited for extremely high-resolution displays. 

Especially for a glare tablet screen a strong background illumination is essential. Our test device achieves around 300 cd/m² at maximum setting; considerably less than Lenovo's competitor (388 cd/m²) or the Venue 11 Pro (436 cd/m²). For indoor use, where values of more than 200 cd/m² are barely needed, this does not restrict in particular, but it might lead to problems for outdoor use - more on that later. The slight backlight bleeding of our test device is also unfortunate: especially for darker images, the area around the edges shows irregular lightening, which strikes negatively when watching, for example, a movie. 

282
cd/m²
294
cd/m²
280
cd/m²
293
cd/m²
308
cd/m²
297
cd/m²
310
cd/m²
297
cd/m²
318
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro 2
Maximum: 318 cd/m² Average: 297.7 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 88 %
Center on Battery: 308 cd/m²
Contrast: 963:1 (Black: 0.32 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 4.1 | - Ø
ΔE Greyscale 2.89 | - Ø
Gamma: 2.34

However, the IPS panel from the manufacturer AUO shows deep black representation (0.32 cd/m²) and a corresponding high contrast ratio (963:1). Regarding this, the display can even compete with the iPad Air (1.145:1); only the OLED technology from Samsung remains out of reach in terms of image quality. Nonetheless: considering the bold and vivid representation of the ElitePad, it is almost a pity to use it solely for pure office work. 

Due to software problems, we had to renounce to our usual image calibration, but the display seems to have decent settings at delivery condition. Most colors and grayscales show DeltaE values that are significantly below 4; but we also do not want to withhold the fact that some blue shades show flaws. Taking everything into consideration, the tablet will satisfy most demands of hobby-photographers and occasional PhotoShop users; the device was not conceived for professional graphics designers anyway.  

Color fidelity (not calibrated)
Color fidelity (not calibrated)
Color saturation (not calibrated)
Color saturation (not calibrated)
Grayscales (not calibrated)
Grayscales (not calibrated)
Outdoor use
Outdoor use

As already mentioned, the moderate maximum brightness of the ElitePad is not best suited for outdoor use. While annoying reflections are not too apparent in shady areas, working in direct sunlight is much more difficult. If one tries to avoid such situations, no further problems should result. 

Viewing angles: HP ElitePad 1000 G2
Viewing angles: HP ElitePad 1000 G2

Finally, we would like to pay attention to the viewing-angle stability. As typical for an IPS panel, we can almost only mention advantages: it does not matter whether from top, bottom, left or right - the image remains flawlessly readable and does not show any distortion or significant contrast decrease. Fortunately, TN panels within the tablet market are barely used anymore, not even for significantly cheaper models.

Performance

2.4 GHz maximum turbo clock speed
2.4 GHz maximum turbo clock speed

An Intel Atom processor for a tablet within the 1,000 Euros (~$1319) class - HP's decision not to integrate a high-class Haswell chip within this price range can be considered bold. At the same time, the manufacturer decided to use the top-version of the Bay Trail T series, the 1.6 to 2.4 GHz fast Atom Z3795The quad-core, which is produced in a 22 nm process, lacks some features and performance, but it has an extremely low power input (2 Watt SDP, probably below 4 Watt TDP). As SoC (System-on-a-Chip), the Z3795 integrates a graphics unit, CPU cores, memory controller and Southbridge with I/O-ports on one chip. 

Next to the processor, there is 4 GB LPDDR3 RAM (533 MHz, 17.1 GB/s) which makes the ElitePad well equipped for the 64-bit version of Windows 8.1. The eMMC flash memory, which is 128 GB for our test device, is also generously dimensioned.

System information for the HP ElitePad 1000 G2

Processor

Constant 2.4 GHz for single-threading,...
Constant 2.4 GHz for single-threading,...
...2.26 GHz for multi-threading
...2.26 GHz for multi-threading

The name "Atom" might still evoke bad memories from earlier notebooks, but the current Bay Trail generation has almost nothing in common with the CPUs of that time. Due to a drastically improved architecture, higher clock speeds and four cores, performance is impressive: the Z3795 performs the single-thread test of Cinebench R11.5 with a full 2.4 GHz and achieves a score of 0.44 points - around 10% more than the AMD A4-5000 with active cooling and significantly higher TDP (15 Watt). Similar differences can be also noted for the multi-threading benchmark, where we measured a clock speed of 2.26 GHz and 1.64 points. These values also remain constant when running on battery only. 

Another interesting comparison is the duel with the Core i5-4202Y, one of the few Haswell models than can be passively cooled. While the Atom can keep up with this core when all units are loaded, performance per core is only half.  This is the disadvantage of the significantly lower power input of the Z3795.

Cinebench R11.5
CPU Single 64Bit (sort by value)
HP ElitePad 1000 G2
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3795, 128 GB eMMC Flash
0.44 Points ∼2%
Lenovo ThinkPad Edge E145-20BC000UGE
Radeon HD 8330, A4-5000, Western Digital Scorpio Blue WD5000LPVX
0.39 Points ∼1% -11%
HP Spectre 13-h205eg x2
HD Graphics 4200, 4202Y, Samsung SSD PM841 MZMTD128HAFV mSATA
0.88 Points ∼3% +100%
Microsoft Surface Pro 3
HD Graphics 4400, 4300U, Hynix HFS128G3MNM
1.12 Points ∼4% +155%
CPU Multi 64Bit (sort by value)
HP ElitePad 1000 G2
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3795, 128 GB eMMC Flash
1.64 Points ∼2%
Lenovo ThinkPad Edge E145-20BC000UGE
Radeon HD 8330, A4-5000, Western Digital Scorpio Blue WD5000LPVX
1.48 Points ∼2% -10%
HP Spectre 13-h205eg x2
HD Graphics 4200, 4202Y, Samsung SSD PM841 MZMTD128HAFV mSATA
1.85 Points ∼3% +13%
Microsoft Surface Pro 3
HD Graphics 4400, 4300U, Hynix HFS128G3MNM
2.77 Points ∼4% +69%
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit
1234
Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit
2300
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit
4106
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
1732 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 64Bit
5761 Points
Cinebench R10 Shading 64Bit
2304 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
6.74 fps
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
0.44 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
1.64 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
36 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
134 Points
Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit
5.1 fps
Cinebench R15 Ref. Match 64Bit
97.8 %
Help

Storage Devices

128 GB eMMC memory
128 GB eMMC memory

Unlike the Surface Pro 3, where a conventional mSATA SSD is used, the ElitePad relies on an eMMC drive – the same technology is also used for most smartphones and ARM tablets. The advantages of such a memory are especially space and energy related, whereas performance is significantly decreased. Read (82.4 MB/s) and write speeds (24.6 MB/s) cannot stand out when compared to a cheap USB 3.0 stick, and also the seek time of around 0.5 milliseconds is relatively bad for a flash memory. More performant solutions are provided by the ThinkPad 10 and the Dell Venue 11, but they also cannot keep up with a "true" SSD.

128 GB eMMC Flash
Transfer Rate Minimum: 32.9 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 67.3 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 55.4 MB/s
Access Time: 0.5 ms
Burst Rate: 23.6 MB/s
CPU Usage: 10.5 %

System Performance

Despite smaller differences for processor and storage medium, PCMark 7 shows an almost similar performance for our three Bay Trail tablets: ElitePad 1000 G2, ThinkPad 10 und Venue 11 Pro. Only the Haswell-equipped and actively cooled Surface Pro 3 from Microsoft can clearly break away with a score which is almost twice as large.  

But what does that mean in practice? Sure: our test device cannot keep up with a modern ultrabook. However, the difference for many applications is smaller than one would expect: it does not even take 20 seconds for the system to be completely operational after a cold boot; Office programs or browsers open without any significant delays. Only very sophisticated or poorly parallelized software brings the processor to its limits - here the Core M (Broadwell) would be the better alternative. 

PCMark 7 - Score (sort by value)
HP ElitePad 1000 G2
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3795, 128 GB eMMC Flash
2627 Points ∼33%
Lenovo ThinkPad 10
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3795, SanDisk SEM64G
2513 Points ∼31% -4%
Dell Venue 11 Pro 5130
HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3770, Samsung MCG8GC
2665 Points ∼33% +1%
Microsoft Surface Pro 3
HD Graphics 4400, 4300U, Hynix HFS128G3MNM
5066 Points ∼63% +93%
PCMark 7 Score
2627 points
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
1297 points
PCMark 8 Creative Score Accelerated v2
1208 points
Help

Graphics Card

Smooth 4K playback
Smooth 4K playback

The graphics unit which Intel simply calls HD Graphics is essentially based on the older Ivy Bridge generation, but it has to make do with significantly less arithmetic units. Just about 4 EUs (HD 4000: 16 EUs, HD 4400: 20 EUs) with a clock speed of a maximum 778 MHz allow for a relatively modest 3D performance, which is reflected by a 3DMark 11 score of 233 points. 

All the more impressive are the many multimedia talents of the GPU: while earlier Atom chips could partly not even handle 1080p videos smoothly, the Bay Trail can even cope with our 4K test video with 90 Mbit/s without complaining. The Quick-Sync support is extremely useful for hardware-accelerated video conversion. 

3DMark 06 Standard
2065 points
3DMark 11 Performance
233 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score
16363 points
Help

Gaming Performance

Let's keep it short: for 3D games from the last 3 to 5 years, the HD Graphics (Bay Trail) is in general way too slow. Only a few, graphically simple games can be played smoothly with low settings, especially casual games as available in the Windows store. Alternatively, classics such as Half-Life 2 or Warcraft III are suited.

low med. high ultra
Anno 2070 (2011) 187.5fps

Emissions

Temperature

Stress test
Stress test
Prime95
Prime95

In daily use, which means playback of videos or browsing, the tablet barely reaches more than 30 °C - apparently, the good heat conductivity of the metal chassis facilitates cooling. Even under full load we could measure at only one point a temperature over 40 °C. Consequently, the ElitePad can be held in the hand even under high loads. 

Also, the hardware within the chassis is far away from its critical temperatures. After our 1-hour stress test, the Atom Z3795 showed a temperature of just 70 °C, but it also has a slight clock decay of the processor (1.4 GHz, varying) and graphics unit (311 MHz). If the ElitePad is only loaded with Prime95, the CPU frequency is, with 2.0 GHz, considerably higher; practical limitations are therefore not expected. 

 28.8 °C29.4 °C30.1 °C 
 29.4 °C30.3 °C29.9 °C 
 32.8 °C32.2 °C31 °C 
Maximum: 32.8 °C
Average: 30.4 °C
29 °C29 °C28.4 °C
29.5 °C29 °C28.6 °C
28.8 °C28.6 °C28.4 °C
Maximum: 29.5 °C
Average: 28.8 °C
Power Supply (max.)  37 °C | Room Temperature 24.2 °C | Voltcraft IR-360

Speakers

Two stereo speakers are mounted on the bottom of the HP tablet, which score pretty well considering that the device has a business orientation. High and intermediate frequencies are played back very clearly and - if wished - surprisingly loudly, such that even a small conference room can be adequately filled with sound. One should, however, not expect significant basses.  

Energy Management

Power Consumption

With its minimum power input of only 2.7 to 4.4 Watt, the HP tablet does not have to hide behind its ARM competitors such as the Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 (2.1-3.9 Watt) or the iPad Air (1.8-7.1 Watt). The extremely low full-load consumption seems almost more impressive: who would have thought a couple of years ago that you could run a Windows computer with a maximum 5.5 to 8.9 Watt?

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0 / 0.2 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 2.7 / 4.2 / 4.4 Watt
Load midlight 5.5 / 8.9 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Voltcraft VC 940

Battery Life

Even though the ElitePad does not count among the thinnest and most lightweight representatives within its class, energy content of its battery is, with 30 Wh, relatively low. Battery life is therefore slightly shorter than for the ThinkPad 10 for example, but it is still on a high level: our test (~150 cd/m² display brightness) with activated Wi-Fi and cyclic calling up of websites and YouTube videos is finished after over 7 hours - Lenovo's alternative lasts around two hours more. For more endurance one has to resort to one of the previously mentioned "Jackets" with optional additional battery.

Reader's test
Reader's test
Wi-Fi test
Wi-Fi test
H.264 test
H.264 test
Classic test
Classic test
Charging
Charging
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
14h 06min
WiFi Surfing
7h 17min
Big Buck Bunny H.264 1080p
7h 24min
Load (maximum brightness)
4h 03min

Verdict

HP ElitePad 1000 G2
HP ElitePad 1000 G2

People trying to find an alternative to a classical business notebook are likely to be disappointed by the HP ElitePad 1000 G2: only a few ports, performance deficiencies, missing features - the list of flaws is long.

The actual intention of the tablet is, however, not to replace a notebook. We consider the ElitePad as an especially mobile (secondary) device, which is best suited for meetings or journeys. Under this point of view, versatility of the product is the biggest advantage: in principle, performance is sufficient for all business tasks; additional interfaces are easily obtained through an adaptor or a dock. Without theses accessories, practical use is significantly restricted. 

Otherwise, HP did a good job: except for a few details, processing and quality are exemplary; temperature management (unlike other manufacturers) allows for use under full load. For a possible successor we would like to see a brighter display, maybe also better cameras as well as a slightly larger battery. It might be possible that the price decreases as soon as more competitors enter the market - even the technically less equipped entry-level model (only 64 GB eMMC, no WWAN) is, at currently 750 Euros (~$987), not a real bargain.

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In review: HP ElitePad 1000 G2. Test model provided by HP Germany
In review: HP ElitePad 1000 G2. Test model provided by HP Germany

Specifications

HP ElitePad 1000 G2 (ElitePad Series)
Processor
Intel Atom Z3795 1.59 GHz
Graphics adapter
Intel HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Core: 311 - 778 MHz, 10.18.10.3408
Memory
4096 MB 
, LPDDR3, not possible to upgrade
Display
10.1 inch 16:10, 1920x1200 pixel, capacitive, Digitizer support, AU Optronics (AUO1AD8), IPS panel, LED-Backlight, Corning Gorilla Glass 3, glossy: yes
Storage
128 GB eMMC Flash, 128 GB 
, 78 GB free
Connections
1 Docking Station Port, Audio Connections: 3.5 millimeters audio jack, Card Reader: microSD, Sensors: brightness sensor, acceleration sensor
Networking
Broadcom BCM43241 (a/b/g/n), Bluetooth 4.0, HP lt4112 Gobi 4G (LTE/EV-DO, HSPA+, GPS)
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 9.2 x 261 x 178 ( = 0.36 x 10.28 x 7.01 in)
Battery
30 Wh Lithium-Polymer, 2 cells, tightly integrated
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro 64 Bit
Camera
Webcam: 2.1 MP front, 8.0 MP + back LED flash
Additional features
Speakers: stereo, 40 Watt as well as 10 Watt adaptor, USB adaptor, HP Expansion Jacket, Docking Station, booklets, HP Client Security, HP Trust Circles, HP Mobile Connect, 12 Months Warranty
Weight
680 g ( = 23.99 oz / 1.5 pounds), Power Supply: 150 g ( = 5.29 oz / 0.33 pounds)
Price
1000 Euro

 

There are many tablets on the market,...
There are many tablets on the market,...
...but this one is different:
...but this one is different:
HP's ElitePad 1000 G2...
HP's ElitePad 1000 G2...
...is a reliable business companion.
...is a reliable business companion.
The subtle premium design shows value and elegance.
The subtle premium design shows value and elegance.
The amount of interfaces is rather poor:
The amount of interfaces is rather poor:
admittedly, the manufacturer...
admittedly, the manufacturer...
...thought of a microSD slot,...
...thought of a microSD slot,...
...but besides that we discover only a few buttons...
...but besides that we discover only a few buttons...
...as well as a headphone jack.
...as well as a headphone jack.
The ElitePad has integrated speakers.
The ElitePad has integrated speakers.
Additional ports...
Additional ports...
...can be obtained through a docking station.
...can be obtained through a docking station.
The manufacturer offers such a docking station for 150 Euros (~$197),...
The manufacturer offers such a docking station for 150 Euros (~$197),...
...with 4x USB 2.0,...
...with 4x USB 2.0,...
...VGA, HDMI and Ethernet.
...VGA, HDMI and Ethernet.
The dock also serves as a practical stand.
The dock also serves as a practical stand.
Besides that,...
Besides that,...
the tablet also supports an active stylus...
the tablet also supports an active stylus...
...and Bluetooth keyboards.
...and Bluetooth keyboards.
With that, productivity can be significantly increased.
With that, productivity can be significantly increased.
Both cameras are rather disappointing;...
Both cameras are rather disappointing;...
...a current smartphone cannot be replaced by the back 8-MP sensor.
...a current smartphone cannot be replaced by the back 8-MP sensor.
A compact 10-Watt adaptor is sufficient,...
A compact 10-Watt adaptor is sufficient,...
for the docking station, a 40-Watt adaptor is included.
for the docking station, a 40-Watt adaptor is included.

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Links

Price Comparison

Pro

+high chassis quality
+integrated LTE module
+viewing angle stable IPS display
+acceptable application performance
+generous memory equipment
+64-bit Windows
+long battery life
+many accessories available
 

Cons

-very high price
-few ports
-limited maintenance and upgrade possibilities
-low 3D performance

Shortcut

What we like

Due to Windows OS, the user has access to the entire software diversity of the x86 world. Even on the road one does not have to renounce to the most important desktop applications. 

What we are missing

We could not determine any huge flaws in our test - most likely the high price will scare off potential buyers. 

What surprises us

It really only uses an Atom processor? Especially for browsing or office applications, CPU performance is absolutely sufficient. Even slight multitasking is no problem for the Z3795. 

The competition

Lenovo ThinkPad 10

Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 8

Dell Venue 11 Pro 5130

Microsoft Surface Pro 3

Rating

HP ElitePad 1000 G2 - 08/19/2014 v4(old)
Till Schönborn

Chassis
82%
Keyboard
75 / 80 → 94%
Pointing Device
86%
Connectivity
50 / 66 → 76%
Weight
80 / 88 → 83%
Battery
91%
Display
84%
Games Performance
33 / 68 → 49%
Application Performance
55 / 76 → 72%
Temperature
88%
Noise
100%
Audio
60 / 91 → 66%
Camera
70 / 85 → 82%
Average
73%
82%
Tablet - Weighted Average
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > HP ElitePad 1000 G2 (F1Q77EA) Tablet Review
Till Schönborn, 2014-08-26 (Update: 2014-08-26)