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Volkswagen ID.6 | VW considers building the electric SUV for the European market in China

Should the Volkswagen ID.6 be released on the European market, many thousands units of the electric VW SUV would likely be made in China (Image: Volkswagen)
Should the Volkswagen ID.6 be released on the European market, many thousands units of the electric VW SUV would likely be made in China (Image: Volkswagen)
If implemented, Volkswagen's alleged plans to produce the European units of the Volkswagen ID.6 electric SUV in China would most likely lead to job cuts in its home country of Germany, where such considerations would certainly be heavily criticized.

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In the tech industry, it is common practice to entirely outsource production to China. Therefore it is no secret that American companies like Apple, Google and Microsoft manufacture most of their devices in the People's Republic. But even in the quickly-changing automobile industry, which is continuously shifting its focus towards electric vehicles, such considerations are more and more common. According to an article by a German news outlet, the by volume second largest automaker in the world Volkswagen now contemplates to import up to 15,000 units of the VW ID.6 electric SUV from China to Europe.

These controversial plans emerge while Volkswagen's main factory in Germany is not even running at full capacity due to the worldwide microchip shortage. The production of the Volkswagen ID.6 in China would simply save money, but it could also cost some VW employees in Germany their jobs, which is why these plans will most likely be met with harsh criticism. Among other factors, the competitive pressure applied by the big American electric car rival Tesla could ultimately play a considerable role in Volkswagen's decision.

Even though Tesla recently made headlines with its soaring stock and new gigantic factories in Germany and Texas, the electric vehicle pioneer led by eccentric CEO Elon Musk produces many vehicles, like the Tesla Model 3 for example, in China and then ships and sells them around the world. Since the Volkswagen ID.6 electric SUV is currently only available and manufactured in China anyways, the decision to simply produce European models in China and then export them to Europe may be economically reasonable, but from a moral perspective the German company could be scrutinized for such a decision.

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ntv, Image: Volkswagen

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Enrico Frahn
Editor of the original article: Enrico Frahn - Tech Writer - 568 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2021
My fascination for technology goes back a long way to the Pentium II era. Modding, overclocking and treasuring computer hardware has since become an integral part of my life. As a student, I further developed a keen interest in mobile technologies that can make the stressful college life so much easier. After I fell in love with the creation of digital content while working in a marketing position, I now scour the web to bring you the most exciting topics in the world of tech. Outside the office, I’m particularly passionate about motorsports and mountain biking.
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2021 10 > Volkswagen ID.6 | VW considers to build the electric SUV for the European market in China
Enrico Frahn, 2021-10-28 (Update: 2021-10-29)