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Deal | Samsung now accepting $700 trade-ins for your Galaxy S10 or iPhone 11 Pro towards a new Galaxy S20

Samsung now accepting $700 trade-ins for your Galaxy S10 or iPhone 11 Pro towards a new Galaxy S20
Samsung now accepting $700 trade-ins for your Galaxy S10 or iPhone 11 Pro towards a new Galaxy S20
You can get 50 percent off the Galaxy S20 or more if you own a Google Pixel 4, Pixel 4 XL, Galaxy S10, iPhone 11, or iPhone XS. Owners of the Pixel 4 should definitely consider the $600 trade-in offer as that is more than what the smartphone is currently retailing for new.

The cat's out of the bag and ready to launch in less than a month's time. If you want the latest and greatest in Android smartphone technology, then it's going to cost you at least $1200 USD.

To make the exorbitant price a bit more palatable, retailers and manufacturers will typically throw in gift cards, accessories, buyback programs, or all three. In this case, Samsung will accept a small range of smartphones for $200 to $700 off the retail price of the upcoming Galaxy S20. These include the following:

Additionally, Samsung will include a separate credit of $100 to $200 towards the purchase of any other product from Samsung's online store. Other retailers like Sam's Club will be hosting their own sales, but none have yet to match Samsung's surprisingly reasonable trade-in offers.

We're not sure how long these trade-in values will last, but they may be worth checking out especially if you're an existing owner of a Pixel 4 or Pixel 4 XL.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 02 > Samsung now accepting $700 trade-ins for your Galaxy S10 or iPhone 11 Pro towards a new Galaxy S20
Allen Ngo, 2020-02-12 (Update: 2020-02-12)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.