Notebookcheck

Samsung begins mass production of the Exynos i T200 chip for IoT use

Samsung Exynos i T200 chip for IoT devices now in mass production June 2017
Samsung Exynos i T200
This is the first Exynos-branded IoT solution by Samsung and it uses the 28 nm High-K Metal Gate process, offering good performance and a high level of efficiency in a compact package.

The IoT market has much space for growth and it seems to expand faster with each month. Samsung Electronics has just announced the start of mass production of its first Exynos chip for this market, namely the Exynos i T200.

Samsung's Exynos i T200 uses a Cortex-R4 and a Cortex-M0+ core, offering WiFi 802.11 b/g/n single-band connectivity. It has been certified by the WiFi Alliance and is also a Microsoft Azure Certified for IoT piece of hardware. At last, it provides native support for IoTivity, a standard from the Open Connectivity Foundation "which enables seamless interoperability between IoT devices."

In addition to the above, this chip also comes with a separated security management hardware block known as SSS (Security Sub-System). The Exynos i T200 also comes with the Physical Unclonable Function (PUF) IP that provides authentication management without the need to fuse a silicon key, relying on a discrete security IC for key storage.

This new chip is expected to show up in the coming months in various IoT devices, but there are no details about the first products expected to use it.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Especially English native speakers welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

+ Show Press Release
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 06 > Samsung begins mass production of the Exynos i T200 chip for IoT use
Codrut Nistor, 2017-06-22 (Update: 2017-06-22)
Codrut Nistor
Codrut Nistor - News Editor
Although I have been writing about new software and hardware for almost a decade, I consider myself to be old school. I always enjoy listening to music on CD or tape instead of digital files and I will not even get into the touchscreen vs physical keys debate. However, I also enjoy new technology, as I now have the chance to take a look at the future every day. I joined the Notebookcheck crew back in 2013 and I have no plans to leave the ship anytime soon.