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Nokia confirms N1 is still not available outside of Asia

Nokia confirms N1 is still not available outside of Asia
Nokia confirms N1 is still not available outside of Asia
The UK online store who claimed otherwise has removed the listing.

The Nokia N1 tablet was listed shortly on the UK Nokia shop as 'coming soon', but the page has since been taken down when Nokia confirmed that there are no current plans to launch the N1 outside of China and Taiwan.

"The online store referenced in the GSMArena.com report is not affiliated to nor authorized by Nokia;", says a spokesperson to TechRadar regarding the N1 launch. Our own emails to [email protected] and [email protected] returned only error messages due to unreachable recipients.

The N1 tablet is as much a Nokia device as it is a Foxconn device due to an agreement between the two companies. The Nokia name is used for advertisement efforts while Foxconn itself owns the trademark, licensing, and distribution rights. The tablet has been available since January in both China and Taiwan and currently sells for about 230 Euros for the 32 GB WiFi configuration.

Core specifications include:

  • Display: 7.9-inch IPS 1536 x 2048 resolution
  • CPU: 2.3 GHz Intel Atom Z3580 SoC
  • GPU: PowerVR G6430
  • Dimensions: 200.7 x 138.6 x 6.9 mm
  • Weight: 318 grams

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 08 > Nokia confirms N1 is still not available outside of Asia
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-08- 6 (Update: 2015-08- 6)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.