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Nokia C1 specifications and renders reportedly leaked

Nokia C1 specifications and renders reportedly leaked
Nokia C1 specifications and renders reportedly leaked
Nokia may be returning to the smartphone market with both Windows and Android operating systems.

Nokia has been a core part of Microsoft since early 2014. Despite this, the Nokia brand itself is only found on a handful of products, such as the upcoming Nokia 230. Third party manufacturers have also incorporated the Nokia branding like the Foxconn N1 Tablet, though such cross-brands are quite uncommon.

New rumors of the Nokia C1 have appeared via rendered image leaks. According to the unnamed source, the C1 may come in two screen sizes - 5.0-inch and 5.5-inch - each with FHD resolution and 5 MP front-facing cameras. The smaller model is expected to have just 2 GB RAM, 32 GB eMMC, and an 8 MP rear camera, while the larger model is expected to carry 3 GB RAM, 64 GB eMMC, and a 13 MP rear camera. Interestingly, both Android and Windows 10 are both being considered for each screen size.

Nokia has made it clear in the past that it fully intends to re-enter the smartphone market by 2016. Nokia CEO Rajeev Suri wants the brand to run under a licensing model as exemplified through the existing Foxconn N1 Tablet. Exactly when we can expect an official reveal of the supposed C1 smartphone is not known.

The current Nokia 950 and 950 XL flagships will be the poster child for Microsoft's Windows 10 Mobile OS.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 12 > Nokia C1 specifications and renders reportedly leaked
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-12- 1 (Update: 2015-12- 1)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.