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New evidence points towards the Pixel 4 phones originally having 4K60 video recording

The Google Pixel 4 is currently limited to 4K30 fps video recording. (Source: Google)
The Google Pixel 4 is currently limited to 4K30 fps video recording. (Source: Google)
The Pixel 4 phones have caught a lot of flak for being unable to record 4K video at 60 fps. According to a discovery, however, it would seem that the devices were originally able to do that but the feature ended up not making it to release software.

One of the biggest deficiencies with the new Google Pixel 4 phones is their lack of 4K60 video recording, a feature that has been on Android phones since last year. Going by new information, however, it would seem that Google originally had 4K60 recording on the Pixel 4 phones, but removed it before the devices were launched.

Google claimed that it removed the feature because of the storage demands of 4K60 video, and the fact that most of its user base favored 1080p video and. We had our issues with that explanation, but the part about storage space does make sense. The Pixel 4 phones start at 64 GB and cap out at 128 GB, which is much less storage than what you'd get from competing devices. The Samsung Galaxy Note 10, for example, has 256 GB.

The fact that the feature was originally on the devices gives us hope that it could be implemented again in a software update. Storage demands are irrelevant as users should have the right to choose.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 10 > New evidence points towards the Pixel 4 phones originally having 4K60 video recording
Ricci Rox, 2019-10-25 (Update: 2019-10-25)
Ricci Rox
Ricci Rox - News Editor - @riccirox
I'm a freelance copywriter who lives and dies for tech. Android, ​especially. The smartphone market is one going through an impressive growth spurt, so I crawl the Internet with keen interest in a technological ecosystem that doesn't seem to be slowing down anytime soon.