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CES 2021 | Intel announces 35 W Tiger Lake-H processors led by the Core i7-11375H Special Edition, aims to take on AMD Ryzen 7 4800HS and Ryzen 9 4900H in single-core performance

Intel Tiger Lake-H35 is aimed at offering enthusiast gaming in an ultraportable form factor. (Image Source: Intel)
Intel Tiger Lake-H35 is aimed at offering enthusiast gaming in an ultraportable form factor. (Image Source: Intel)
At CES 2021, Intel has unveiled the Tiger Lake-H 35 W processors for ultraportable gaming laptops. With the introduction of these processors, Intel is not only offering further market segmentation among gaming laptops but also is looking to take on AMD's Renoir Ryzen 7 4800HS and the Ryzen 9 4900H in single-core performance. The new Tiger Lake-H35 processors led by the Core i7-11375H Special Edition can boost up to 5 GHz and also offer resizable BAR support with NVIDIA's upcoming Ampere mobile GPUs.

We have earlier reported that Intel would be offering Tiger Lake in both 35 W and 45 W variants. The 35 W is designed to cater to thinner gaming laptops whereas the upcoming 45 W chips are meant to offer desktop-class performance. Today, at CES 2021, Intel has finally taken the wraps off the 11th generation 35 W Core-H series Tiger Lake chips and is also introducing a new market segmentation for gaming laptops.

New gaming laptop segments

With the introduction of 35 W chips for gaming, Intel is creating new market segments. So, gaming laptops will now fall under Essential (US$699-US$999), Ultraportable (US$999-US$1,999), Thin Enthusiast, and Halo Enthusiast categories (above US$1,9999) all with discrete graphics. Today's launch is focused around the Ultraportable segment, which Tiger Lake-H35 aims to cater to.

Whether OEMs would follow this classification or not is not clear at this moment, but Intel's offerings in the days to come will very well use this demarcation to indicate budgets and the kind of performance that can be expected from each product line.

Gaming laptop segmentation. (Source: Intel)
Gaming laptop segmentation. (Source: Intel)

11th Core H-series platform features — Resizable BAR included

Intel said that ultraportable gaming laptops should not only be thin but also be enthusiast gaming capable. Marketing speak aside, what this means is that laptops powered by Tiger Lake-H35 chips will feature technologies such as PCIe Gen4 connectivity to the GPU, Killer Wi-Fi 6E Gig+ (including the Killer Prioritization Engine), Thunderbolt 4, Optane H20 support, and more. 

That being said, certain features such as overclocking and XTU support are absent in H35 and will be reserved for the more powerful 45 W chips due later this quarter. Oh, and Intel also confirmed that resizable BAR will be coming to the platform in partnership with NVIDIA.

Tiger Lake-H35 PCH features - 1. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 PCH features - 1. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 PCH features - 2. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 PCH features - 2. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 PCH specifications and block diagram. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 PCH specifications and block diagram. (Source: Intel)

Intel Core H-series 35 W SKUs led by the Core i7-11375H Special Edition

According to Intel, the Core-H series 35 W is meant to offer the perfect combination of mobility and gaming prowess. Though we'd like to test these claims ourselves soon, for now, Tiger Lake-H35 is said to be able to boost up to 5 GHz on single-core with Turbo Boost 3.0. The SKU that achieves this is the flagship Core i7-11375H Special Edition.

The other two SKUs are the Core i7-11370H and the Core i5-11300H. All SKUs in Tiger Lake-H35 are 4C/8T parts and can be configured with cTDP up 35 W and cTDP down 28 W.

Intel says that the Core i7-11375H's single-core performance is only matched by their 10th gen 45 W counterparts. In a SPECRATE 2017_int_base comparison, Intel showed the Core i7-11375H as having nearly 30% higher performance than both the 35 W AMD Ryzen 7 4800HS and the Ryzen 9 4900H, both of which are 8C/16T parts.

Coming to gaming performance, Intel said that Tiger Lake-H35 is aimed at 1080p 70 fps and "smooth" 4K gaming. The exact numbers will be made available once NVIDIA's lifts the performance embargo for the upcoming Ampere mobile GPUs.

Tiger Lake-H35 is being pegged as an ultramobile platform that can also game. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 is being pegged as an ultramobile platform that can also game. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 CPU features including support for PCIe Gen4 and Resizable BAR. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 CPU features including support for PCIe Gen4 and Resizable BAR. (Source: Intel)
Core i7-11375H single-core performance comparison against AMD Ryzen 7 4800HS and Ryzen 9 4900H. (Source: Intel)
Core i7-11375H single-core performance comparison against AMD Ryzen 7 4800HS and Ryzen 9 4900H. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 gaming performance targets. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 gaming performance targets. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 SKUs. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 SKUs. (Source: Intel)
 

Availability

All major OEMs will offer Tiger Lake-H35 models this year in the ultraportable gaming laptop segment. Intel said that about 40+ designs can be expected from OEMs such as Acer, Asus, MSI, Vaio, Dell, HP, Lenovo, and more. Many of these laptops will make their debut during CES 2021.

Tiger Lake-H35 will feature in 40+ designs this year. (Source: Intel)
Tiger Lake-H35 will feature in 40+ designs this year. (Source: Intel)

Source(s)

Intel Press Brief

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2021 01 > Intel announces 35 W Tiger Lake-H processors led by the Core i7-11375H Special Edition, aims to take on AMD Ryzen 7 4800HS and Ryzen 9 4900H in single-core performance
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2021-01-11 (Update: 2021-01-11)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor - 1286 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2012
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.