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Galaxy fans are in for a treat: Here's how the Samsung Galaxy S11 and S11 Plus might look like

Could this turn out to be the Samsung Galaxy S11? (Source: LetsGoDigital)
Could this turn out to be the Samsung Galaxy S11? (Source: LetsGoDigital)
If renders based on Samsung's recent patents turn out to be accurate, the upcoming Galaxy S11 and S11 Plus could offer a unique take on the slide phone concept. Renders seem to suggest that the Galaxy S11 could use a rolling display that can be extended upwards by about 25%. The slider display uses a 'waterfall' design with flowing icons and also conceals the rear multi-camera setup.

With the Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10+ launching to rave reviews, it's time once again to speculate on Samsung's next big release, the Galaxy S11. We are still quite some time away from knowing some of the meaty details of the device, but Dutch site LetsGoDigital has managed to create a few renders based on patents filed by Samsung with the USPTO.

If the patent indeed bears fruition in the Galaxy S11, we may see the return of the slider phone in true Samsung style. At the outset, the Galaxy S11 looks like any other regular candybar phone. We get to see a display with rounded edges similar to the Galaxy S and Note series. This time though, Samsung would further extend the curvature of the screen halfway to the sides creating a "waterfall" design. However, there seems to be more to the display than meets the eye.

The patent describes a metal slider on the edges of the phone. By sliding upwards, the screen further extends by about 25%. This is possible via a drive shaft in the metal housing along which the flexible display can bend and roll in or roll out. Moreover, the waterfall design is only applicable to the upper part of the display while the lower part of the screen along the metal frame is flat. This prevents wrinkling of the screen as you slide it up and down. Once extended, the upper part of the waterfall display offers icons that you can scroll through among various other functions. 

Details about the Galaxy S11's cameras are still elusive (108 MP with 10x optical zoom, anyone?), but we can expect at least a three or four camera system at the back and possibly more than one camera at the front. The rear cameras are accessible only when the display is slid up and are otherwise protected inside the housing.

LetsGoDigital has used Samsung's patent as a reference while implementing some of the features already found in the Galaxy S10 and S10 Plus including a double-punch hole front camera and the placement of buttons and connectors. 

At this moment, these are just renders based on a patent and we might not even get to see such a design in the final product. That being said, these design renders sure look suave and are worthy of being implemented in the upcoming Galaxy S11 and S11 Plus. What do you think?

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Samsung patent for a slider display. (Source: LetsGoDigital)
Samsung patent for a slider display. (Source: LetsGoDigital)
The sliding concept could debut with the Galaxy S11 and Galaxy S11 Plus. (Source: LetsGoDigital)
The sliding concept could debut with the Galaxy S11 and Galaxy S11 Plus. (Source: LetsGoDigital)
The sliding mechanism extends the display area by about 25%. (Source: LetsGoDigital)
The sliding mechanism extends the display area by about 25%. (Source: LetsGoDigital)
 

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 09 > Galaxy fans are in for a treat: Here's how the Samsung Galaxy S11 and S11 Plus might look like
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2019-09-17 (Update: 2019-09-17)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.