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Dell EMC PowerEdge servers powered by AMD EPYC CPUs now on sale

The Dell EMC R7425 server is based on AMD EPYC. (Source: Dell)
The Dell EMC R7425 server is based on AMD EPYC. (Source: Dell)
Dell has listed new PowerEdge servers powered by AMD EPYC CPUs for order. The EPYC-based servers are available in 1U and 2U rack sizes and can be extensively customized based on the requirements of the enterprise while still offering a high performance per dollar compared to equivalent Intel Xeon-based servers.

Dell EMC has listed new PowerEdge servers up for orders on its site. The new servers are powered by AMD EPYC processors that are built for datacenter applications. The company is targeting the data analytics, High Performance Computing (HPC), virtualization, and scale up software-defined deployments with these servers. The listed models include R7425, R6415, and R7415.

The PowerEdge R7425 is a 2U dual-socket server with up to 64 high performance Zen cores meant for HPC applications. It can be configured with up to 4 TB RAM in a 16 channel configuration and supports up to 24 NVMe SSDs. The R7415 is a 2U single-socket server, which can be configured with up to 32 Zen cores, 2 TB RAM, and 24 NVMe drives. The R7415 is also the first AMD-powered server to be VMware vSAN certified. The R6415 is a 1U single-socket server with up to 32 Zen cores, 2 TB RAM, and 10 NVMe drives. All three models feature 128 PCIe lanes.

The AMD EPYC CPUs promise dual-socket class performance even in single-socket configurations and have the potential to put pressure on the dual-socket Xeon chips that Intel has been trying to push into this market. The performance per dollar is significantly high in case of EPYC at all price points. The sub-US$4,000 server market, which comprises 90% of all servers, is especially poised to benefit from this increased performance-to-price ratio promised by EPYC. 

Combined with the security features inherent to both Dell EMC and AMD, many enterprises can be expected to deploy EPYC-based PowerEdge servers and save significantly on the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). All that remains to be seen is how effectively Dell can market these new offerings.

This year, we will also see next-gen EPYC 'Rome' CPUs based on Zen 2 cores. The new 'Rome' CPUs will be based on a 7 nm architecture and will have offerings up to 48 cores and 96 threads along with Higher Order Reasoning capabilities, support for PCIe Gen4, and integrated Vega 20 GPUs. If AMD can court other OEMs as well, it has the potential to make a dent in Intel's coffers in the enterprise. 

Performance comparison between EPYC and Xeon in dual-socket configurations. (Source: ZDNet)
Performance comparison between EPYC and Xeon in dual-socket configurations. (Source: ZDNet)
Performance per dollar comparison of a single-socket EPYC with a dual-socket Xeon. (Source: ZDNet)
Performance per dollar comparison of a single-socket EPYC with a dual-socket Xeon. (Source: ZDNet)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 02 > Dell EMC PowerEdge servers powered by AMD EPYC CPUs now on sale
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2018-02- 7 (Update: 2018-02- 7)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.