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Core i9-powered MSI WS66 workstation is super sleek, super fast and super loud

Core i9-powered MSI WS66 workstation is super sleek, super fast and super loud (Source: MSI)
Core i9-powered MSI WS66 workstation is super sleek, super fast and super loud (Source: MSI)
All that performance in such a thin chassis comes at the cost of fan noise. MSI Cooler Boost mode is a fancy name for "Maximum Fan" mode for users who want to exploit the Core i9-10980HK and Quadro RTX 5000 Max-Q GPU to their maximum potential.
Allen Ngo, 🇩🇪

Much like the MSI GS66 and its insane specifications, the WS66 is able to pack both a 10th gen Core i9-10980HK CPU and an Nvidia Quadro RTX 5000 Max-Q GPU in a chassis that's just barely 20 mm thick. Both processors are able to run at their advertised clock rates without any issues even after long periods of high utilization as detailed in our review here.

Of course, there's usually a drawback when something sounds too good to be true. In the case of the MSI WS66, fan noise can reach almost 60 dB(A) when the system is under heavy load to be one of the loudest workstations we've recorded. It's possible to disable maximum fan mode (called Cooler Boost mode) for a more tolerable maximum fan noise of 47.4 dB(A), but you won't get the maximum performance out of the CPU or GPU if so.

MSI's closest competitor, the Razer Blade 15 Studio, runs quieter but it comes with "only" the Core i7-10875H to be over 20 percent slower than our Core i9-10980HK. Thus, MSI owners will have to deal with loud fans if they want the most out of their Core i9 and Quadro RTX 5000 Max-Q machines.

Buy MSI WS66 now on Amazon

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 08 > Core i9-powered MSI WS66 workstation is super sleek, super fast and super loud
Allen Ngo, 2020-08-31 (Update: 2020-09- 1)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.