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Blender 2.82 brings improved physics engines, support Pixar USD export, and more

Blender 2.82 improves on the new sculpting systems. (Image via Blender)
Blender 2.82 improves on the new sculpting systems. (Image via Blender)
Blender 2.82 was released on February 14th, bringing with it several new features. Among the most prominent are the inclusion of Mantaflow (a fluids system simulator), UDIM for texture mapping, and support for Pixar's USD file format.
Sam Medley,

Blender, the open-source modelling software package, released its latest update yesterday. Version 2.82 introduces quite a few new features, including a new physics engine, AI denoising, support for Pixar’s USD file format, and more.

Perhaps the biggest update is the inclusion of Mantaflow, a fluid simulation framework. Blender 2.82’s Mantaflow system offers improved smoke and fire simulations. Additionally, the new FLIP fluids solver introduced in this update allows creators to better simulate fluids.

Other updates include UDIM, a tile-based UV mapping system for creating and editing textures on surfaces, support for Pixar’s Universal Scene Description (USD) file format, support for AI-based denoising (for Nvidia RTX GPUs only), and improvements on the new sculpting system introduced in Blender 2.81.

There are a ton of new features in this update, all of which are detailed over at Blender’s website here.

Do you use Blender? Have you tried the new version? What are your thoughts? Let us know in the comments.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 02 > Blender 2.82 brings improved physics engines, support Pixar USD export, and more
Sam Medley, 2020-02-15 (Update: 2020-02-15)
Sam Medley
Sam Medley - Review Editor - @samuel_medley
I've been a "tech-head" my entire life. After graduating college with a degree in Mathematics, I worked in finance and banking a few years before taking a job as a Systems Analyst for my local school district. I started working with Notebookcheck in October of 2016 and have enjoyed writing news articles and notebook reviews. My areas of interest include the business side of technology, retro gaming, Linux, and innovative gadgets. When I'm not hunched over an electronic device or writing code for a new database, I'm either outside with my family, playing a decade-old video game, or sitting behind a drum set.