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Bing market share at 33 percent in the United States

Bing's search engine is also used by some other services such as Yahoo. (Source: Microsoft)
Bing's search engine is also used by some other services such as Yahoo. (Source: Microsoft)
Infographics from the Microsoft Bing team show market share is higher than you may have expected with many countries in double digits. International market share is at a much lower 9 percent.

The Bing team at Microsoft published a couple of infographics on Twitter (here and here) proudly showing that Bing holds an unexpected 33 percent market share in the United States, followed by Taiwan at 26 percent and the United Kingdom at 23 percent. There are several countries where Bing holds a double digit market share, but regions such as South America (5 percent) and Asia/Pacific (4 percent) bring the global average down to 9 percent.

One of the infographics is titled "Bing is bigger than you think" and that statement accurately sums up the feelings of most reading this. A few key details in the fine print say that these stats are based on data supplied by search analyst company, ComScore qSearch, which Neowin fact-checked against NetMarketShare and found that Bing had just under 7 percent desktop share.

However, this is where the rest of the fine print comes in. These stats are for all searches involving the Bing engine, which includes Yahoo! and AOL searches so if we add these together with Bing then NetMarketShare totals 11.8 percent. Combined desktop and mobile statistics are behind a subscription, but mobile search is dominated by Google.

In comparison, Google has an 81.1 percent market share on desktop and 96.4 percent on mobile.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 08 > Bing market share at 33 percent in the United States
Craig Ward, 2017-08-20 (Update: 2017-08-20)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.