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Computex 2019 | Asus ROG G703 will use patent pending liquid metal thermal paste process, promises 13 C cooler temperatures

Asus ROG Mothership with liquid metal thermal paste (left) vs. ROG Mothership without liquid metal thermal paste (right)
Asus ROG Mothership with liquid metal thermal paste (left) vs. ROG Mothership without liquid metal thermal paste (right)
Asus is ready to ship laptops with liquid metal thermal paste and the initial results have us excited. The cooler temperatures will lead directly to quieter, lighter, or thinner laptop designs from future ROG laptops.

If you're an enthusiast desktop PC builder, then you're likely already familiar with ceramic or carbon thermal paste vs. liquid metal thermal paste. The former is a cheaper solution utilized by most OEMs for its ease of application while the latter is a pricier alternative with better conductivity fit for overclockers. Liquid metal thermal paste is very rarely found on commercial laptops except from select Clevo resellers like Eurocom who will apply the paste by hand.

Asus has announced at Computex 2019 that it will be making the jump to liquid metal for its future ROG laptops. The Taiwanese manufacturer will be partnering with Thermal Grizzly who is a highly regarded provider of liquid metal thermal paste amongst desktop PC builders. As shown by our images below, users can expect a temperature difference of about 17 C when compared to a laptop with regular thermal paste. The two ROG Mothership demo units were running Prime95 all day on the show floor to show the maximum temperature difference users can expect. The results are very promising especially for a gaming laptop where cooler core temperatures have been traditionally very challenging.

So, what is preventing Asus from using liquid metal paste across the entire ROG lineup? According to the manufacturer, it is currently developing a patent pending process that will automate the application of the liquid metal thermal paste at the assembly level. Liquid metal paste is comparatively more difficult to apply correctly than ceramic or carbon and so Asus will only offer the option for its flagship ROG G703 series and ROG Mothership series with 9th gen Core i9 first later this year.

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The Asus ROG Mothership makes a reappearance from ROG REDEFINE 2019
The Asus ROG Mothership makes a reappearance from ROG REDEFINE 2019
Core temperature on ROG Mothership with liquid metal thermal paste showing an average core temperature of 72 C
Core temperature on ROG Mothership with liquid metal thermal paste showing an average core temperature of 72 C
Core temperature on ROG Mothership without liquid metal thermal paste showing an average core temperature of 89 C
Core temperature on ROG Mothership without liquid metal thermal paste showing an average core temperature of 89 C
Asus will automate the thermal paste application process first on the ROG Mothership and ROG G703
Asus will automate the thermal paste application process first on the ROG Mothership and ROG G703
well-known company Thermal Grizzly will be providing the liquid metal thermal paste
well-known company Thermal Grizzly will be providing the liquid metal thermal paste

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 05 > Asus ROG G703 will use patent pending liquid metal thermal paste process, promises 13 C cooler temperatures
Allen Ngo, 2019-05-29 (Update: 2019-05-29)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.