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AMD to offer an open, cross-platform implementation of DLSS-esque super-sampling, will work with Intel and NVIDIA for high-quality visuals across PC and console

AMD is looking at an open source, cross-platform super-sampling feature that works across PC and consoles, but that will take some time. (Image Source: AMD)
AMD is looking at an open source, cross-platform super-sampling feature that works across PC and consoles, but that will take some time. (Image Source: AMD)
AMD's Scott Herkelman hinted that the company is working to offer an open implementation of super-sampling in partnership with Intel and NVIDIA that works across PCs and consoles unlike NVIDIA's proprietary DLSS. He also said that ray tracing performance of current Radeon RX 6000 cards will improve with time. Further, Frank Azor added that AMD will look into the possibility of enabling Smart Memory Access with non-500-series chipsets as well.

AMD's new Radeon RX 6800 and RX 6800 XT were shown to be quite competitive against their NVIDIA counterparts in most rasterization benchmarks. While Navi 21's ray tracing is not too shabby for the first attempt, AMD hasn't detailed much on an NVIDIA DLSS-equivalent super-sampling approach. However, AMD's Scott Herkelman and Frank Azor happened to drop a few hints on what we can expect to see in the near future.

Speaking to HotHardware's Dave Altavilla and Marco Chiappetta, Frank Azor said that RDNA 2 focuses on gaming first and foremost. We've seen with the CDNA-based Instinct MI100 launch that AMD is separating datacenter and gaming architectures. Azor said that while RDNA2 cards can possibly do well in non-gaming workloads too, the priority with RDNA 2 is gaming first and foremost.

Coming to the topic of super-sampling (@30:01 min in the video below), Scott Herkelman said that AMD's goal is opposite to that of NVIDIA's when it comes to a super-sampling implementation. Without divulging too many details, Herkelman said that AMD's game development partners across PC and console have been "begging" them not to create vendor or game-specific APIs to lessen the burden of coding for multiple architectures and reduce development time.

AMD is apparently looking to work with Intel and NVIDIA as well to create an open super-sampling method that works for games across PC and console — code that developers across platforms can easily reuse without much effort. However, developing it will take time so AMD is not committing anything right now apart from the fact that it is investing a lot of resources into it and that it will definitely come to the new Radeon cards and possibly even to other platforms in the near future.

Herkelman also felt the ray tracing performance from RX 6000 cards are "pretty good" and while vast majority of games currently available still don't use this feature, he did confirm that ray tracing performance will improve over time as more cross-platform games across PC and console become available.

On the point of whether Smart Access Memory support can be expected for motherboard chipsets such the B550, Frank Azor said that Smart Access Memory has been validated for 500-series motherboards and Zen 3 Ryzen processors for now. Performance uplift and reliability for enabling Smart Access Memory with other chipsets will be explored in the future.

Watch the video below for more insights into the RX 6000 lauinch from Scott Herkelman and Frank Azor.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 11 > AMD to offer an open, cross-platform implementation of DLSS-esque super-sampling, will work with Intel and NVIDIA for high-quality visuals across PC and console
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2020-11-21 (Update: 2020-11-21)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.