Notebookcheck

AMD announces the Ryzen 4000G series Renoir APUs for pre-built OEM desktops; claims a slam dunk when compared with Intel 9th gen Coffee Lake

AMD Ryzen 4000G aims to take on Intel 9th gen Coffee Lake head-on but will only be available in OEM PCs. (Image Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 4000G aims to take on Intel 9th gen Coffee Lake head-on but will only be available in OEM PCs. (Image Source: AMD)
AMD has now officially unveiled the Ryzen 4000 APU series for pre-built OEM desktops across consumer and commercial segments. The Ryzen 4000G APUs sport the exact same configuration as their mobile counterparts but feature additional TDP headroom that allows for higher CPU and GPU clocks. AMD is pitting the Ryzen 7 4700G against the likes of the Core i7-9700 and claims that it has managed to slam dunk the competition.

It has been long rumored that AMD Renoir APUs would soon make their way to the desktop. Renoir APUs have proven their mettle on laptops and it was only a matter of time before we would see them grace desktops. Now, AMD has officially announced the availability of Ryzen 4000 Renoir APUs for desktops with the promise of good performance gains and the ability to run popular games at 1080p between low and medium settings without having to invest in a discrete GPU.

AMD has announced both consumer and commercial versions of the Ryzen 4000G and Athlon 3000G processors, pitting them against the likes of Intel's 9th gen Coffee Lake series. However, there's a catch.

Ryzen 4000G for pre-built OEM systems only, new APUs and CPUs coming soon for DIY

Ryzen 4000G APUs will be available only with pre-built OEM systems. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 4000G APUs will be available only with pre-built OEM systems. (Source: AMD)

AMD is introducing Renoir desktop APUs today targeting only pre-built systems from OEMs such as Dell, HP, Lenovo, and the likes. These processors will not be available to system integrators and definitely cannot be purchased off the shelf.

AMD, however, confirmed that next gen APUs and CPUs for DIY users will be coming soon but declined to share any further details.

Platform features — Same as Ryzen 4000 for mobile

Ryzen 4000G has the same configuration as that of Ryzen 4000 for laptops. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 4000G has the same configuration as that of Ryzen 4000 for laptops. (Source: AMD)

AMD confirmed that the desktop Ryzen 4000G processors sport exactly the same configuration as their laptop variants with the only differences being the TDP and clock tuning. AMD is still yet to provide further technical details, but everything we've seen with mobile Ryzen 4000 applies to desktop as well in toto. What this means is that Ryzen 4000G is still a monolithic Zen 2 die with support for eight lanes of PCIe Gen3 for the discrete GPU (if the OEM decides to include one). Memory support is also the same as that of mobile Ryzen 4000 i.e. up to DDR4-3200. And no, it will not be possible to have an SLI/CrossFire-esque functionality between the Radeon iGPU and a dGPU.

SKUs: Ryzen 7 4700G leads the pack

The Ryzen 4000G family is comprised of a total of six SKUs — three 65 W and three 35 W with the flagship processor being the Ryzen 7 4700G. The Ryzen 7 4700G sports eight cores and 16 threads, has a 12 MB cache, is clocked at 3.6 GHz base with boost up to 4.4 GHz, and features Radeon RX Vega 8 graphics clocked at 2,100 MHz. The extra TDP headroom allows the processor to have added CPU and GPU clocks compared to its closest laptop counterpart, the Ryzen 9 4900H

Following the Ryzen 7 4700G are the Ryzen 5 4600G and the Ryzen 3 4300G. While the G series is rated at 65 W, the GE series are 35 W parts with reduced CPU and GPU clocks.

Ryzen 7 4700G. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 7 4700G. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 4000G series SKUs. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 4000G series SKUs. (Source: AMD)

Performance

AMD also showed off some performance metrics comparing the Ryzen 4000G against competing offerings from Intel 9th gen chips. Of course, these are AMD's numbers and we will have to test the claims ourselves to be sure. However, we do get an idea of the kind of performance boosts that can be expected from this lineup.

The Ryzen 7 4700G showed significant leads in both single and multi-core Cinebench tests when compared with the Core i7-9700. The maximum performance delta was seen in the multi-core tests as expected since the Core i7-9700 does not feature hyperthreading. The difference in 3DMark Time Spy scores was also substantial when compared with Intel's offerings.

When Ryzen 4000 for laptops was announced, AMD said that they had worked on increasing the performance of each compute unit (CU) in the graphics core. This is the reason why a Radeon RX Vega 8 in Ryzen 4000 can deliver up to 59% higher performance per CU compared to a Radeon RX Vega 11 in Ryzen 3000 APUs. With increased TDP headroom up to 65 W, that number has now gone up to nearly 64% and it shows in both synthetic and real world gaming benchmarks.

This increased GPU throughput enables Ryzen 4000G to offer decent 1080p gaming in popular games at low to medium settings without having to invest in a discrete GPU. This should also benefit content creation apps and help accelerate certain workflows.

Check out some of the performance slides from AMD's presentation below for the Ryzen 7 4700G, Ryzen 5 4600G, and the Ryzen 3 4300G.

Ryzen 4000G series comparison with Intel 9th gen. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 4000G series comparison with Intel 9th gen. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 7 4700G Cinebench and 3DMark Time Spy gen-to-gen improvements. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 7 4700G Cinebench and 3DMark Time Spy gen-to-gen improvements. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 7 4700G gaming performance in comparison with Intel Core i7-9700. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 7 4700G gaming performance in comparison with Intel Core i7-9700. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 7 4700G content creation performance in comparison with Intel Core i7-9700. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 7 4700G content creation performance in comparison with Intel Core i7-9700. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 5 4600G Cinebench and 3DMark Time Spy gen-to-gen improvements. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 5 4600G Cinebench and 3DMark Time Spy gen-to-gen improvements. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 5 4600G gaming performance in comparison with Intel Core i5-9500. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 5 4600G gaming performance in comparison with Intel Core i5-9500. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 5 4600G content creation performance in comparison with Intel Core i5-9500. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 5 4600G content creation performance in comparison with Intel Core i5-9500. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 3 4300G Cinebench and 3DMark Time Spy gen-to-gen improvements. (Source: AMD)
Ryzen 3 4300G Cinebench and 3DMark Time Spy gen-to-gen improvements. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 3 4300G gaming performance in comparison with Intel Core i3-9100. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 3 4300G gaming performance in comparison with Intel Core i3-9100. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 3 4300G content creation performance in comparison with Intel Core i3-9100. (Source: AMD)
AMD Ryzen 3 4300G content creation performance in comparison with Intel Core i3-9100. (Source: AMD)
 
 

Athlon 3000G announced as well

AMD Athlon 3000G CPUs take on Intel Pentium Gold and Celeron offerings. (Source: AMD)
AMD Athlon 3000G CPUs take on Intel Pentium Gold and Celeron offerings. (Source: AMD)

Additionally, AMD also announced the new Athlon 3000G lineup based on Zen+ cores to take on Intel's Pentium Gold and Celeron offerings. The Athlon lineup is comprised of two 4C/4T Athlon Gold parts, the Athlon Gold 3150G and 3150GE, with 65 W and 35 W TDP, respectively along with an Athlon Silver 3050GE, which is a dual-core 35 W part. In comparison with the Intel Pentium Gold G5600 and G5400 offerings, the Athlons feature double the cores, higher clocks, and a larger cache. The new Athlon 3000G series will also be available exclusively for pre-built OEM systems.

Source(s)

AMD Press Brief

Read all 2 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 07 > AMD announces the Ryzen 4000G series Renoir APUs for pre-built OEM desktops; claims a slam dunk when compared with Intel 9th gen Coffee Lake
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2020-07-21 (Update: 2020-07-21)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.