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Zotac releases new Zbox M and smartphone-sized Zbox P mini-PCs

Zotac Zbox MI553. (Source: Zotac)
Zotac Zbox MI553. (Source: Zotac)
Today Zotac announced two new mini-PCs, further expanding their mid-range Zbox M and ultra-compact Zbox P series. The Zbox MI553 comes in a standard and a Plus variant, has a mobile Intel i5-7300HQ processor, and an eGPU compatible Thunderbolt 3 port. The Zbox PI225 claims the title of the smallest mini-PC, contains a Celeron N3350 CPU, and has smartphone-like dimensions.

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There is something inherently cool about miniature computing, and this is an area which Zotac have been particularly active in over the last few years. Zotac’s Zbox series of mini-PCs range from low powered computer-stick devices with Intel Atom processors, all the way up to an Intel i7-7700 with XMX GTX 1080 Graphics card. Today Zotac has released two new models in their mid-range M-series and ultra-compact P-series.

The MI553 is the larger model, available in both a 'standard' and 'plus' variant, and it is equipped with a notebook class i5-7300HQ. Both have the same physical dimensions at 185 x 185 x 72 mm (7.3 x 7.3 x 2.8 inches), but the standard model is a barebones system, while the Plus comes with a 120 GB m.2 SSD and 4 GB DDR4 RAM. Key features include Thunderbolt 3, two storage expansion slots (m.2 and 2.5-inch), USB-C, 1000 Mbps LAN, and 802.11ac. The MI553 supports 4K output via HDMI 2.0 and DisplayPort 1.2, so with a large 2.5-inch hard drive installed it would do nicely as a media center PC. The Thunderbolt 3 port does support eGPU enclosures, although using an external graphics card with a compact desktop is an unusual use case.

The PI225 claims the honor of being the world’s smallest mini-PC since its form-factor excludes it from being considered a compute stick. There is a Celeron N3350 ‘Apollo Lake’ at its heart, 4 GB DDR3 RAM, and 32 GB eMMC storage with Windows 10 Home pre-installed. Cooling is handled passively, and all physical connectivity is provided by 2 x USB-C which handle regular USB tasks in addition to the video output. The PI225 could be mistaken for a smartphone at a glance, measuring 95 x 63 x 8 mm (3.8 x 2.5 x 0.3 inches).

Zotac MI553Zotac MI553 PlusZotac PI225
CPUi5-7300HQ 2.5/3.5 GHz 4C/4Ti5-7300HQ 2.5/3.5 GHz 4C/4TCeleron N3350 1.1/2.4 GHz 2C/2T
RAM2 x SODIMM DDR4-2133/2400 slots1 x 4 GB DDR4 (total 2 SODIMM)4 GB LPDDR3
Storage1 x M.2 Slot, 1 x 2.5-inch slot1 x 120 GB M.2, 1 x 2.5-inch slot32 GB eMMC + microSD slot
Operating SystemNoneNoneWindows 10 Home 64-bit
Ports

Front: SD card reader / USB3.1 combo
1 x USB-C
Rear: WiFi Antenna
1 x Thunderbolt 3
4 x USB3
1 x RJ45 1000 Mbps LAN

Front: SD card reader / USB3.1 combo
1 x USB-C
Rear: WiFi Antenna
1 x Thunderbolt 3
4 x USB3
1 x RJ45 1000 Mbps LAN
2 x USB-C (inc. video)
1 x microSD
Seperate power connector
Dimensions185 x 185 x 72 mm (7.3 x 7.3 x 2.8 inches)185 x 185 x 72 mm (7.3 x 7.3 x 2.8 inches)95 x 63 x 8 mm (3.8 x 2.5 x 0.3 inches)

 

 

 

Zotac Zbox MA553. (Source: Zotac)
Zotac Zbox MA553. (Source: Zotac)
Zotac Zbox MA553. (Source: Zotac)
Zotac Zbox MA553. (Source: Zotac)
Zotac Zbox PI225. (Source: Zotac)
Zotac Zbox PI225. (Source: Zotac)
Zotac Zbox PI225. (Source: Zotac)
Zotac Zbox PI225. (Source: Zotac)

Source(s)

Zotac MI553

Zotac PI225

Zotac promotional material

Zotac press release

+ Show Press Release
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 09 > Zotac releases new Zbox M and smartphone-sized Zbox P mini-PCs
Craig Ward, 2017-09- 7 (Update: 2017-09- 8)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.