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ZTE Nubia Z11 Max phablet to ship with large 4000 mAh battery

ZTE Nubia Z11 Max phablet to ship with large 4000 mAh battery
ZTE Nubia Z11 Max phablet to ship with large 4000 mAh battery
The manufacturer teases its new "NeoPower 2.0" technology for improved power consumption without even giving any battery life estimations or comparisons.

ZTE General Manager Fei Ni recently boasted on Weibo a new feature for the upcoming Z11 Max phablet called "NeoPower 2.0". The feature all comes down to the high capacity 4000 mAh battery in the device that was made possible by increasing the density of the battery while optimizing and improving power consumption throughout the unit. Accordingly, specific hardware decisions such as the inclusion of AMOLED and certain camera modules were made with power consumption in mind.

The Nubia Z11 Max will launch this June 11th in China. Recent leaks claims that the device will carry a 6-inch FHD panel with especially narrow bezels for a high screen-to-body ratio of 83.27 percent. In comparison, most smartphones typically lie in the 70 to 80 percent range. Other core specifications include a Snapdragon 652 SoC, 4 GB RAM, and 64 GB eMMC, all of which should place the Z11 Max comfortably in the mainstream category. The smaller Z11 Mini was announced just last April as well.

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General Manager Fei Ni erklärt die Vorzüge von NeoPower 2.0 im Detail ...
General Manager Fei Ni erklärt die Vorzüge von NeoPower 2.0 im Detail ...

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > ZTE Nubia Z11 Max phablet to ship with large 4000 mAh battery
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06- 1 (Update: 2016-06- 2)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.