Notebookcheck

Nubia Z11 spotted at TENAA as multiple variants

Nubia Z11 spotted at TENAA as multiple variants
Nubia Z11 spotted at TENAA as multiple variants
ZTE has so far only introduced one member in the Nubia Z11 family. These latest leaks, however, show that the other two larger variants should be coming sooner rather than later.

The Nubia Z11 Mini was officially announced on April 20th, but it was obvious that more in the Z11 family would be down the pipeline given the "Mini" suffix. Now, the bigger Z11 and Z11 Max have made their way to Chinese telecommunications regulatory agency TENAA with some specifications and images.

Nubia Z11

As the middle-ground offering between the Z11 Mini and Z11 Max, the Z11 is expected to be a 5.5-inch FHD smartphone with specifications not unlike the Z11 Mini such as a Snapdragon 617 SoC, 4 GB RAM, and 32 GB eMMC with MicroSD support. The rear and front cameras will be 16 MP and 8 MP, respectively. Final dimensions are listed at 151.8 x 72.3 x 7.75 mm with a 2900 mAh battery. This particular model will also carry LTE and Android 5.1.1 according to the TENAA documents. 

Nubia Z11 Max

The larger Z11 Max is expected to be a 6-inch FHD phablet with the more potent Snapdragon 652 SoC, 4 GB RAM, and 64 GB eMMC with MicroSD support. Final dimensions are listed at 159.15 x 82.25 x 7.4 mm with a much larger 4000 mAh battery pack. Otherwise, its cameras and Android Lollipop software are to be identical to the Z11.

These leaks contradict much earlier rumors about the Z11 carrying the more powerful Snapdragon 820 SoC.

Similar design but with a larger display
Similar design but with a larger display

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > Nubia Z11 spotted at TENAA as multiple variants
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-05-15 (Update: 2016-05-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.