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Nubia X8 smartphone will allegedly carry 4K display and Snapdragon 823 SoC

Nubia X8 smartphone will allegedly carry 4K display and Snapdragon 823 SoC (Source: Gizmochina)
Nubia X8 smartphone will allegedly carry 4K display and Snapdragon 823 SoC (Source: Gizmochina)
The 6.4-inch phablet should be followed by three other lower-end models. Official prices and launch dates have yet to be announced.

According to Gizmochina, a total of four Nubia X8 smartphones are in the works. The supposed X8 PPT 6.4-inch phablet model will likely be the highlight of the family while the Nubia X8 Lifestyle model will carry the hexa-core Snapdragon 650 SoC with 3 GB RAM, 1080p display, and 16 GB eMMC. This particular model is expected to offer the longest battery life out of the X8 series.

Meanwhile, the Nubia X8 Standard Edition should be carrying the more powerful Snapdragon 820 SoC as found on the recent LG G5 flagship. Other hardware specifications include 3 GB RAM, 32 GB eMMC, and a 1080p display. The Nubia X8 High will have an even higher resolution of 2560 x 1440 pixels, 4 GB RAM, and 64 GB eMMC.

Finally, the top tier model will be the Nubia X8 PPT with a supposed display resolution of 3840 x 2160 pixels, 6 GB RAM, and a Snapdragon 823 SoC. This particular SoC will be very similar to the Snapdragon 820, albeit clocked higher and will likely run warmer as a result.

While information on the Nubia X8 remains unconfirmed, the Nubia X8 was reportedly spotted in the wild as early as June of 2015.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Nubia X8 smartphone will allegedly carry 4K display and Snapdragon 823 SoC
Andreas Müller/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04-27 (Update: 2016-04-27)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.