Notebookcheck

ZTE Blade A2 offers an octa-core SoC for under 110 Euros

ZTE Blade A2 offers octa-core SoC for under 110 Euros
ZTE Blade A2 offers octa-core SoC for under 110 Euros
The 5-inch smartphone launches next week in China and will be one of the cheapest smartphones with an integrated fingerprint sensor.

Alongside the flagship Nubia Z11 Max announcement comes the budget Blade A2 smartphone as the successor to the Blade A1. The device was actually announced last December, but more details and a firm launch date are now finally confirmed.

Core specifications include:

  • 5-inch 720p display
  • 1.5 GHz octa-core MediaTek MT6750 SoC
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 16 GB eMMC w/ MicroSD reader
  • 13 MP rear PDAF and LED Flash + 5 MP front cameras
  • Dual-SIM
  • Android 5.1
  • 2500 mAh battery

Other features include a fingerprint sensor and LTE radio, though the latter supports only bands 1, 3, 7, and 39 to 41. Most regions in Western Europe rely on band 20 for LTE connectivity. The smartphone is notable for its octa-core processor that is uncommon for its price range.

The Blade A2 will be available in Silver, Gray, and Gold color options for the equivalent of 105 to 110 Euros starting June 15 in China.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Especially English native speakers welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

http://item.jd.com/3101502.html

via: http://www.gsmarena.com/zte_blade_a2_launched_with_octacore_cpu_5inch_display-news-18666.php

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > ZTE Blade A2 offers an octa-core SoC for under 110 Euros
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06-10 (Update: 2016-06-10)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.