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More images and specifications leak on ZTE Nubia Z11

More images and specifications leak on ZTE Nubia Z11
More images and specifications leak on ZTE Nubia Z11
Several pictures showing off the thin design and small body of the smartphone have leaked just days before the official unveiling.

Chinese manufacturer ZTE is expected to officially unveil the 5.5-inch Nubia Z11 on June 28th and several recent leaks are already giving us a good picture of its design, features, and hardware. Accordingly, it appears that ZTE will continue to incorporate its signature near-borderless screen-to-body ratio of over 80 percent. Unlike last year's Nubia Z9, the Nubia Z11 will have a metal chassis for better rigidity and resistance. There should also be a fingerprint sensor on the back and a small dedicated home button on the front according to the leaked images from Gizmo China. The overall design emphasizes a slim and narrow build not unlike the iPhone 6s and Oppo R9.

Other leaked specifications according to an AnTuTu benchmark entry include:

  • 2.5D glass display at 1920 x 1080 pixel resolution
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 SoC
  • 4 GB RAM
  • 64 GB eMMC
  • 16 MP rear + 8 MP front cameras
  • Android 6.0.1

A second SKU is also expected with 6 GB RAM and 128 GB eMMC. The 4 GB/64 GB and 6 GB/128 GB versions will presumably retail for 3000 Yuan (300 Euros) and 4000 Yuan (540 Euros), respectively.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > More images and specifications leak on ZTE Nubia Z11
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06-27 (Update: 2016-06-27)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.