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Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 sells more than 2 million in China

Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 sells more than 2 million in China
Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 sells more than 2 million in China
The budget 5.5-inch Redmi Note 2 is the manufacturer's bestseller so far.

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Sales for the Redmi Note 2 start for a bargain price of just 800 Yuan (111 Euros) and the model is apparently selling like hotcakes in China. In just 12 hours since its launch, Xiaomi had reported selling 800K units in its home territory. The 5.5-inch Redmi Note 2 carries a FHD screen, dual-SIM slots, and a MediaTek MT6795 Helio X10 octa-core SoC.

Sales figures thus far have surpassed the 2 million mark according to the manufacturer. This includes the two different SKUs of the Redmi Note 2 and all available color options. On September 5th, Xiaomi manager boasted over social networks more than 1.5 million orders for the smartphone have been placed. If customer interest continues, then the Redmi Note 2 could hit the 10 million mark.

The numbers are particularly impressive when considering that the Redmi Note 2 is not currently available in most other countries and regions outside of China. Nonetheless, buyers can still import the phone from various online distributors.

Xiaomi recently surpassed LG as one of the world's top smartphone manufacturers according to at least one study.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 09 > Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 sells more than 2 million in China
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-09-14 (Update: 2015-09-14)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.