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Rumors point to incoming Huawei D8 smartphone for 2016

Rumors point to incoming Huawei D8 smartphone for 2016
Rumors point to incoming Huawei D8 smartphone for 2016
The roadmap shows the P9, P9 Max, and a possible D8 with Kirin 960 SoC and sapphire display.

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According to Chinese tech site mobile-dad.com, the Huawei D8 will be another high-end smartphone from the manufacturer with a large 5.5-inch 2560 x 1440 resolution display, previously unannounced Kirin 960 SoC, and 4 GB RAM. The kicker, however, is that the smartphone is also rumored to carry a sapphire crystal display for better resistance to cracks. The D8 could cost as much as $775 USD according to the source.

The leaked roadmap also reveals the P9 and P9 Max with QHD displays, Kirin 950 SoCs, and 4 GB RAM each. This is compared to the current Huawei Mate 8, which sports a Kirin 950 SoC and "only" a FHD panel. The Mate 8 will officially launch in a number of European territories within the next few weeks for a starting price of 700 Euros.

Our most current review on Huawei is the Mate S with the Kirin 935 SoC. If the rumors are proven true, then the D8 could be one the first smartphones with a sapphire display and a hefty price to show for it. Currently, the Apple Watch is one of the only "smart" devices carrying a Sapphire display option.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 12 > Rumors point to incoming Huawei D8 smartphone for 2016
Andreas Müller/ Allen Ngo, 2015-12-26 (Update: 2015-12-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.