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References to Intel 'Whiskey Lake-U'-powered Lenovo Yoga 730 and IdeaPad 730S notebooks surface online

New Lenovo notebooks powered by Intel 'Whiskey Lake-U' chips are coming soon (Representational image).
New Lenovo notebooks powered by Intel 'Whiskey Lake-U' chips are coming soon (Representational image).
A couple of B2B sites have started listing Lenovo laptops that feature the upcoming Intel 'Whiskey Lake-U' CPUs. The notebooks include the Lenovo s730 and IdeaPad 730S powered by the Intel Core i5-8265U and the Lenovo Yoga 730 powered by the Intel Core i7-8565U. Not much information is available about these notebooks right now but we can expect them to be officially announced during IFA 2018.

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Intel's 'Whiskey Lake-U' is expected to be the successor to 'Kaby Lake-R' and we might see laptops sporting the new Core i5-8265U and the Core i7-8565U debut at IFA this year. We've seen specifications of the Asus ROG GL503 leak recently and now we are seeing names of new Lenovo laptops pop-up on B2B sites. The newly listed Lenovo laptops include the s730, Yoga 730, and the IdeaPad 730S.

The Lenovo s730 and the IdeaPad 730S seem to sport almost identical specifications — a 13.3-inch FHD display, Intel Core i5-8265U CPU, 8 GB LPDDR3 RAM, and 256 GB SSD. The Lenovo s730 moniker sounds a bit strange. It could be that this is actually a Core i5 variant of the Yoga 730. Both carry '13IWL' in their model numbers. The 'IWL' stands for Intel Whiskey Lake. Neobits lists the IdeaPad 730S at around US$1,225 but the product cannot be added to the cart at this time.

The Lenovo Yoga 730, on the other hand, has a 13.3-inch FHD touch display, Intel Core i7-8565U, 8 GB DDR4 2400 RAM, 512 GB PCIe SSD, and a fingerprint reader. Apart from these brief specifications, no other information is provided. 

Both the Core i5-8265U and the Core i7-8565U are 4C/8T parts and sport a modest 15W TDP making them highly power-efficient. They are still based on the 14nm++ process and if our previous performance comparison of the 8th gen 'Kaby Lake-R' and 7th gen 'Kaby Lake' is anything to go by, the new 'Whiskey Lake-U' chips should be more than adequate for light gaming when paired with a capable GPU such as the NVIIDA GeForce GTX 1050

Although Lenovo is already having the IdeaPad 330-15ICN that sports an Intel 10nm 'Cannon Lake' Core i3-8121U, Intel's delays with 10nm production meant that this CPU is rather unremarkable and is more of a test bed for both Intel and Lenovo. Therefore, 'Whiskey Lake-U' will continue to be a 14nm++ part and hopefully, we will get to see more 'Cannon Lake-U' CPUs in Q3 2019 if everything goes well at Intel.

Lenovo s730 entry. (Source: Synnex)
Lenovo s730 entry. (Source: Synnex)
Lenovo Yoga 730 entry. (Source: Synnex)
Lenovo Yoga 730 entry. (Source: Synnex)
Lenovo IdeaPad 730 entry. (Source: Neobits)
Lenovo IdeaPad 730 entry. (Source: Neobits)
 

Source(s)

Synnex (1) and (2)

Neobits

Thanks to reader Ascariss for the tip!

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 08 > References to Intel 'Whiskey Lake-U'-powered Lenovo Yoga 730 and IdeaPad 730S notebooks surface online
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2018-08- 7 (Update: 2018-08- 7)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.