Notebookcheck

No respite in sight for creative pros trying to get NVIDIA GPUs to work on macOS Mojave

Creatives feel Apple should let existing NVIDIA drivers work on Mojave. (Source: Jason Diamond on Facebook)
Creatives feel Apple should let existing NVIDIA drivers work on Mojave. (Source: Jason Diamond on Facebook)
Apple users trying to get their NVIDIA GPUs to work on macOS Mojave 10.14 may be out of luck as Apple has not approved any NVIDIA drivers for the OS yet, even months after release. The only NVIDIA GPUs supported are the Quadro K5000 and the GTX 680. This leaves out those wishing to use the improved CUDA acceleration and other proprietary NVIDIA development tools on macOS Mojave out of luck.

It's been over a couple of months since Apple's latest OS, macOS Mojave 10.14, was released but if you are rocking a latest generation NVIDIA GPU, you won't be able to use it with the new OS. Many creative professionals prefer using NVIDIA GPUs to take advantage of CUDA acceleration and other proprietary development tools. They were able to do so till macOS High Sierra 10.13, but not any more. Apple has restrictions on what GPUs are compatible with macOS Mojave 10.14 and only the ageing Quadro K5000 for Mac and GeForce GTX 680 Mac Edition are listed from the NVIDIA camp as supported GPUs.

In a forum post, NVIDIA said,

Developers using Macs with NVIDIA graphics cards are reporting that after upgrading from 10.13 to 10.14 (Mojave) they are experiencing rendering regressions and slow performance.
Apple fully controls drivers for Mac OS. Unfortunately, NVIDIA currently cannot release a driver unless it is approved by Apple.
Our hardware works on OS 10.13 which supports up to (and including) Pascal.
Apple has published a help topic that includes a list of supported hardware for OS 10.14 Mojave. They suggest directing additional inquiries here.

This means you won't be able to use most NVIDIA cards, including the latest Turing-based GPUs, unless Apple specifically approves NVIDIA drivers for macOS Mojave. NVIDIA is said to be working with Apple for Mojave driver support but we do not know of any timelines yet. It is also being learnt that Apple also did not provide pre-release OS versions and access to low-level APIs in Mojave for NVIDIA to create GPU drivers for the platform.

Understandably, this inaction of Apple's part has miffed professionals who prefer using NVIDIA GPUs on their Macs. Emmy award-winning producer and editor Jason Diamond took to social media urging users to sign the petition on Change.org. In a Facebook post, Jarred Land, President of RED Digital Cinema, said,

Not allowing NVIDIA to put out drivers for OSX 10.14 hurts my business. We depend on NVIDIA drivers to keep our Macs flying through apps like Creative Cloud, Resolve and RED Workflows. We NEED these drivers to keep our pipelines from impacting our clients."

The exact reasons as to why Apple is not allowing NVIDIA drivers on macOS Mojave is not yet known. If you are a creative professional who needs to use NVIDIA GPUs or eGPUs, we'd suggest you stick with macOS High Sierra 10.13 for now. Hopefully, Apple and NVIDIA work to resolve this issue in the interest of the creative community.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

(Source: @Filmbot on Twitter)
(Source: @Filmbot on Twitter)

Source(s)

Read all 4 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 12 > No respite in sight for creative pros trying to get NVIDIA GPUs to work on macOS Mojave
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2018-12-17 (Update: 2018-12-17)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.