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Nextbit Robin smartphone now available for pre-order

Nextbit Robin smartphone now available for pre-order
Nextbit Robin smartphone now available for pre-order
The Cloud-based smartphone began life as a Kickstarter project and has collected $1.36 million USD thus far.

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At first glance, the Nextbit Robin may appear like an ordinary high-end smartphone with its 5.2-inch FHD display, Snapdragon 808 SoC, 3 GB RAM, 32 GB eMMC, 13 MP + 5 MP cameras, fingerprint sensor, NFC, Quick Charge, stereo speakers, and a 2580 mAh battery. The defining feature, however, is its special Cloud-based services.

The Nextbit Robin allows users to quickly move installed apps and files to a server through the Internet. It's not unlike Google Drive, but the Robin is tailored heavily towards easy transfers between local and Cloud-based files.

The Nextbit Robin can now be ordered via its official online store at bakerkit.com for a price of just under $400 USD. Shipping costs vary considerably between regions. Users in Germany, for example, must pay $95 USD for shipping compared to just $25 for U.S. buyers. The Kickstarter is aiming for a ship date of January 2016 for early backers of the project. Colors are available in Gray and Teal and will launch for all major U.S. carriers including GSM and CDMA networks. The latter is a bit of a surprise as a good chunk of International smartphones tend to skip CDMA compatibility altogether.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > Nextbit Robin smartphone now available for pre-order
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-10-22 (Update: 2015-10-22)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.