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Microsoft Lumia 650 render could be the rumored Saana smartphone

Microsoft Lumia 650 render could be the rumored Saana smartphone
Microsoft Lumia 650 render could be the rumored Saana smartphone
Microsoft may soon announce a new Lumia smartphone with Snapdragon 210 SoC and 4G support.

The Lumia 650 "Saana" may soon complement the upcoming Lumia 950 and 950 XL as the mid-range solution. The already revealed and more affordable Lumia 550 is one step below the 650 in terms of hardware features, so the 650 may be the "missing link" for the refreshed Lumia lineup with Windows 10.

Recently, a render of the Lumia Saana appeared online with signs pointing towards the 650 branding. Based on the leaked model name (RM-1152) and specifications, however, the hardware appears far too weak to be classified as a mainstream smartphone.

According to the source, the Lumia 650 is expected to have a 5-inch 720p display, Snapdragon 210 MSM8909 SoC, 4G LTE support, MicroSD slot, and a 2000 mAh battery based on the model number. Mid-range smartphones tend to carry a Snapdragon 400 SoC at the very least. It remains to be seen if the rendering is indeed the Lumia 650 or some other model as part of the Lumia family.

The Lumia 950 and 950 XL will launch sometime next month to kickoff Windows 10 for smartphones.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > Microsoft Lumia 650 render could be the rumored Saana smartphone
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-10-22 (Update: 2015-10-22)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.